Clunking when shifting - Page 2 - Honda CBR250R Forum : Honda CBR 250 Forums
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Old 10-02-2012, 10:26 AM   #11
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Also watch your RPM's. If you switch in/out of 1st at higher speed/RPM it clunks. Look in the OM for recommended shift speeds.
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Old 10-02-2012, 10:47 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HMenke View Post
I agree with what other posters have said, the gearbox is a bit clunky when new.

Also, as a new rider you might try this technique: when you are close to the point where you want to shift, place your toe under the gearshift lever and apply a bit of upward pressure on it, and get your hand on the clutch lever with a bit of pressure (but do not enter the friction zone). At the moment you want to shift: 1) blip the throttle partly closed 2) squeeze the clutch 3) shift 4) smoothly release the clutch while opening the throttle back up. Harder to describe than to do it...it happens in the blink of an eye.

Here's a great video tutorial:

Smoother gear Changing, gear shifting on your motorbike. - YouTube
It will do in the situation of easy riding, but will not happen if we planning speedy riding after the red light.

Tell me on what RPM we should shift to second gear optimally?

Sent from my GT-P1000N using Motorcycle.com Free App
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Old 10-02-2012, 07:20 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BitTraveller View Post
It will do in the situation of easy riding, but will not happen if we planning speedy riding after the red light.

Tell me on what RPM we should shift to second gear optimally?

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Anywhere between 6,000rpm and 10,000rpm should be fine. Optimally for what? Thrashing (9-10,000rpm) it or just relaxed and cruising the streets (6-7,000rpm)?

And don't baby the gear lever: positive firm movements will give you nice changes. Poking at it cautiously will result in noisy and cluncky changes.

After several hundred km everything gets nice and smooth. I noticed a large change in how smooth the gear lever (the whole bike really) was after about 700km . The bike just keeps getting better (feel and mpg) even now at 2100km, even though I ride it harder now.

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Last edited by CBR_Dave; 10-02-2012 at 07:25 PM.
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Old 10-02-2012, 10:08 PM   #14
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I won't baby the gear lever and don't care about the clunk now, but to minimize the clunk I choose the relaxed driving style until things get smoother.

Thank's all for the advice, I really appreciate it..
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Old 10-03-2012, 04:28 AM   #15
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mate, the good news is that not only will the bike
improve with use, but you will improve your riding skills
with time and repetition of he various skills..

without jumping ahead,, think of any, skill.. you name it..
with repetition alone, there must come efficiency..
efficiency includes relative speed, smoothness,
flow of technique and ease of application..

i find that starting with selecting neutral from 1st or second
parked, at idle etc, is best achieved with gentle tap[s]..
when changing gears you need only a short [thus fast]
smooth in and let-out of the clutch, timed with throttle..
so even if you start out pulling the clutch in a fair way
and fairly slowly changing gears etc, so long as you allow
yourself to continue improving with repetition, and mistakes,
which while not necessary, should be learning experiences,
you shifting will continue to become smoother easier
and better and more efficient..

just as if you throttle off in any gear, you will slow down,
so when upshifting you should be throttling on..
you can practice this by for eg, clutch in plus
throttle up while clutch in, release clutch with higher
revs, for more acceleration or at least maintain speed..

you will want to do this quickly with a handfull of throttle
if say taking off from the lights with someone up your arse
'playing games' with you.. cbr250r will lift front wheel
a little, under control, when you give it some this way..
the idea is to not, lift wheels, but to experience
and learn from, the different techniques of
changing gear for various purposes
and generally..
practice makes perfect..
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Old 10-03-2012, 06:07 AM   #16
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Well said bro..
Practice makes perfect, no doubt...

And, I'll think about lifting my front wheel..
(trying to figure it how to do that under control)..

Thanks..
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Old 10-03-2012, 10:44 AM   #17
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Pre-loading the shift lever will help you immensely. Following description stolen from another site:

1. Preload the shift lever with your left foot. The amount of pressure involved is very slight: greater than mere desire, less than a push or pull. Just preload it enough that the muscles of your foot and ankle tense, and any slack in the shift linkage (think of the shift linkage as the bike's muscle, or an extension of your's) is gently removed, and the shift drum and forks, if they were released from the clutch-driveline pressure, would rotate and slide in the intended direction.
2. Pull the clutch lever in, but *just enough* so that the clutch-driveline pressure is reduced enough to that the drum and forks are released to rotate and slide. You don't need to pull the level all the way in to do this. 1/4 to 1/3 of the way will do it. (Stop thinking of the lever as an on-off, two-position switch. Think of it as a means of altering a how much pressure two rotating surfaces are exerting on one another. It's a pressure gradient dude! The further you pull in the clutch, the lower the pressure. Okay?) If you're having trouble executing this, try using just two fingers, or one finger, to pull the lever. That'll slow you down some.
3. Snick. The clutch-driveline pressure falls below some significant point, and suddenly the shift drum rotates and the forks slide the gears, instantly, noiselessly, before the flywheel even has much chance to slow down. You'll feel this, and you'll smile and say "yeah" to yourself.
4. At the moment you feel it, and without relaxing your foot, release the clutch lever.
5. Simultaneously, adjust your throttle to keep that flywheel spinning at as close to the same rpm as it was before. Some transitions, e.g. 1st to 2nd, or 3rd to 2nd, may require a little more throttle than others.
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Old 10-03-2012, 10:46 AM   #18
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Also remove the shifter off its shaft and re-grease it after a few thousand km or lots of rain/washing, it drys out.
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Old 12-03-2012, 05:20 AM   #19
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Welcome aboard Matey. There's no need to apologise for your English, it's very good.
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