Should I warm up my CBR? - Honda CBR250R Forum : Honda CBR 250 Forums
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post #1 of 21 Old 01-26-2017, 01:17 PM Thread Starter
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Should I warm up my CBR?

Good afternoon all,

I have been warming up my CBR since I bought it a couple years ago, and have heard that this isn't really necessary due to the fact that the bike is fuel injected. I am not convinced, as I still feel like it would contribute to engine health having the engine's components and liquids being warmed up and in a uniform state. This is just conjecture on my part though, with little to no evidence to support it.

So basically, I was curious: should I warm up my bike or is this unnecessary?


Thanks all!
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post #2 of 21 Old 01-26-2017, 02:10 PM
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Hey Luke, I let my bike hit 1 bar of warmth in the morning when it's alittle cold in the morning. It's about average 30 degrees here in South Africa most afternoons when I go home so I only let it idle for about 1min or so. I'm at 30k kilometres and the engine still feels amazing.

I do also believe it's good to let the engine warm up to 1 bar when the temps are below 15 Degrees. (Non murica units)

So in conclusion luke, what your doing now, don't stop your only helping the longevity of your bike.

Ride safe Luke.

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post #3 of 21 Old 01-26-2017, 02:24 PM
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You should let it warm up some, but nowhere near "warm". It's going to take a long time at idle to bring an engine up to operating temp, and even then it's the water temp and not the oil temp you are seeing. To get an engine fully warm takes about 20 minutes of riding in normal temps. Again, that's not just the "temp gauge" - it's the oil temp.

Start the bike up, then finish putting on your gear. Take off and ride at a moderate engine speed - usually about 1/2 of redline max until it shows normal temp on the gauge. For full-on revving, it's best to run it longer to get the oil up to temp.

Use a good oil (Rotella T5 10W-30 or a cycle specific full synthetic oil) and change it often. Also check it regularly, as the CBR doesn't hold much. Give the engine some time to get fully warm before really hittin' it.

That's your best defense against the majority of preventable engine problems.
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post #4 of 21 Old 01-26-2017, 03:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lukethecoder View Post
Good afternoon all,

I have been warming up my CBR since I bought it a couple years ago, and have heard that this isn't really necessary due to the fact that the bike is fuel injected. I am not convinced, as I still feel like it would contribute to engine health having the engine's components and liquids being warmed up and in a uniform state. This is just conjecture on my part though, with little to no evidence to support it.

So basically, I was curious: should I warm up my bike or is this unnecessary?


Thanks all!
Warming up your motorcycle is good before you hammer it hard. Here's how you can do your warmup efficiently:

Start your motorcycle and let it run until the idle is stable. This will typically take only a few seconds. This is when I usually put on my gloves as the last item of my riding gear (ATG;ATT).

Then ride away gently, keeping the throttle setting and the revs moderate, until you see a bar or two on the temperature gauge. This will typically take a mile or two, depending on what the ambient temperature is.

Then you're mostly warmed up and you can open 'er up a little more and your temperature gauge will soon be at full operating temperature and then you can ride as hard as you want to.

It's really easy for me to do these steps because I live about two miles from the main highway so I can get to one or two bars by riding on the street and county road that lead to the highway. Most of the time there is little traffic on the highway so I can keep riding moderately without worrying about obstructing traffic . . . .
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Last edited by pooder7; 01-26-2017 at 03:14 PM.
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post #5 of 21 Old 01-26-2017, 05:12 PM
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also consider your systems are ecu controlled
thus startup idle will go from 2000 to 1400
from cold.. having ridden say 30mins before,
idle will start somewhere above 1500, skipping
initial 2000rpm starting point..

my first startup routing for cbr250r was coming from
non fuel injected non ecu controlled motorcycles,
so i more or less started her up, lightly revved,
then took off.. this was coincidentally also the phase
of engine cut-outs, usually after hard acceleration
then rapid decel/braking..

after finding this forum i was educated to correct startup
by experienced members, including not,, touching throttle,,
allowing revs to drop from 2000 to 1400 before using
throttle, and then taking off..

after using this simple startup process, she began smoothly
starting at 2000 then dropping to 1500 then stabilising
to a nice 'heartbeat' at 1400.. [coincidentally
that engine cut-out phase faded away]

[i was using ethanol blend petrol as well,
so that could have been a contributing factor]

as for oil temp, operating temp etc,
what is measured etc, as members above..

my startup is usually [now cbr300r] the same
with ignition on, hit starter button, dont touch throttle..
then [with spare key] unlock chain and rear disc lock,
hop on board, don helmet, sunnies and gloves,
[not rushing it] 'test' fingers on lever movement,
relax shoulder blades etc, take a few nice relaxed
diaphragmatic breathes, check up/down/around,
hear a voice which says; 'righto, here we go'
then move up out and around arcing downslope
very smoothly and slowly, inside foot last up,,
lightly tapping front brake with one finger
before approaching first intersection..

until full oil circulation, your engines
mating surfaces etc, are protected only by
a thin coat of cold oil from your last run..
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post #6 of 21 Old 02-09-2017, 03:40 PM
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I always wait until there is 1-2 bars on the temp gauge and the rpm's settle down. Gives the motor a chance to get lubricated in warm oil before pushing it.
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post #7 of 21 Old 02-09-2017, 07:53 PM
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Nope….. just start it and, when the motor is running smoothly (20 or 30 seconds), ride off gently…. However, don't go hard until the engine has reached normal operating temperature. It is better to warm a vehicle up under light load than at idle.

Without any special warm up procedures, fancy oil or anything other than regular recommended routine maintenance, my 1997 100cc Honda did 15 years and over 170,000 km before its first overhaul. A few months back I replaced the original carb with a new gasohol compatible one and was pleasantly surprised with a 35% improvement in fuel consumption….. Was doing a little over 100 mpg. Now 135 - 140 mpg solo, and about 125 mpg two up. 258,000 km on the clock now.
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post #8 of 21 Old 02-10-2017, 08:16 AM
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Get on, turn key, wait for gauges to stop, crank, ride away easily and slowly.

No warm-up, no waste, no harm. Riding it is the most effective way to warm up a FI bike.
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post #9 of 21 Old 02-10-2017, 04:27 PM
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that was also my basic startup routine
[depending on temp etc] on my non-ecu
carburetted motorcycles,, but ecu is
a factor in controlling fuel flow,
which seems to include initial drop
from 2000 to 1500 then a 1400
'heartbeat'..

this isnt just letting it sit there idling away,
but it isnt starting off and riding away
either.. time it takes to start up, don
helmet, sunnies, gloves etc, then take
a few gentle deep breathes to focus,
is about all it takes to settle at 1400
[from cold], and for a bar to come up
then or shortly after, easing away
[downhill] for low load riding
for a bit.. cost nothing..

first lesson learned here from experienced
riders was 'dont touch the throttle'..
which also works..

some crossover in meaning here
between 'startup' and 'warmup'..
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post #10 of 21 Old 02-10-2017, 10:17 PM
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Excessive idling does more harm than good. Fuel is rich to help warm the engine, which washes oil from the cylinder walls and reduces catalytic converter life. The low RPM's also make the engine take much longer to get the oil up to temperature to reduce the overly rich mixture, leading to excessive carbon buildup and wear.

In the olden days, bikes only needed to idle as long as needed to be able to take off without the bike sputtering, and this was when clearances were much more loose and needed the metal to expand and fill. With fuel injection, the mixture is always calculated and thusly is never a problem. So on our carefully engineered and beautifully running bikes, both 'startup' and 'warmup' can occur simultaneously safely with no detrimental effects.

Regardless, waiting to see 2 bars on the temp gauge is too long. Anything beyond a few seconds is not necessary; but some raised from the olden days feel better about it.

Tis better to be thought a fool and remain silent, than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt.
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