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Old 08-01-2013, 11:10 AM Thread Starter
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please help me out,is it engine kill switch problem or fuel pump problem??
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Old 08-01-2013, 11:15 AM
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Started at 16 in the U.k with my CBT (Compulsory Basic Training) = MSF. Passed my full U.K test at 18. Got my advanced police training course at 21. Kill switch is for emergencies.

I have to agree with Arrethul on this one. 12 years experiance counts for something No offence intended Peach. Your comment did come across as a little condasending.

However no worrys Take care & ride safe.
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Old 08-01-2013, 11:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by manojcys View Post
in india every one uses the engine kill every time and from now i will use it only in emergency.but if fuel pump is not working then bike wont start right???? And pgmi light blinks???

Here cbr technicain is saying fuel pump is not working,but my bike runs properly after a couple of switiching engine kill switch.
We here in the West see a fair amount of strange ideas and practices coming out of India where motorcycles are concerned, on these forums. It nice to see that you are open to suggestions from other members here... many members from India seem too stubborn to want to listen to what other more experienced members have to say... although there are plenty of people here in the United States with some equally crazy notions when it comes to motrcycles too.

As far as your bike problem goes, I can only make an educated guess: It sounds to me like the electrical contacts inside your Engine Stop Switch are worn to the point that you now have an intermittent failure. Unfortunately intermittent electrical problems are not always very easy to test for.
If it comes down to just replacing parts to try and correct the problem, I would start with installing a new Engine Stop Switch first (it's also much less expensive than a fuel pump).

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Last edited by MotoMike; 08-01-2013 at 11:27 AM.
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Old 08-01-2013, 11:32 AM
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Long as you can hear/feel the pump start when you turn the key then the pump should be fine.

I'm not positive where our fuel filter is, but it may also be a dirty fuel filter. But, You would notice a drastic loss of power while riding. So if you don't have any loss of power then don't consider that comment.

Now, I agree with MotoMike you may of worn out your engine kill switch contacts. I would take off the kill switch and check out the contacts if they even let you take it apart that much. I think they should be pretty cheap to replace though. Appears its around $40. Honda Motorcycle Parts & ATV Accessories OEM Dirt Sport Bike Scooter Cruiser Touring Parts Off Road Motorcycles ATVs Starter Motors
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Old 08-01-2013, 11:54 AM Thread Starter
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thanks to all


and if fuel pump is not working then bike will start or not???
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Old 08-01-2013, 11:58 AM
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Originally Posted by manojcys View Post
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and if fuel pump is not working then bike will start or not???
If the fuel pump is not working properly, no the bike will not start.

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Old 08-01-2013, 01:30 PM
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It's interesting to read these passionate opinions about the proper purpose and use/misuse of the Engine Stop Switch (ESS) / "kill switch".

Personally, I fall into the category of a daily user of the ESS.

One reason: habit from riding dirt bikes. On a dirt bike, I always press the kill switch to stop the engine because I like to keep both hands on the grips while the engine is running. I feel the same way when I am on my CBR.

To start the CBR, I turn on the key to "on" with the ESS "off", to let the computer / dashboard boot up. I use that moment to review the display. Then I flip the ESS to the "on" position, which runs the fuel pump and I presume enables the ignition system. After classically waiting for the fuel pump to stop and the yellow light to extinguish, I press the starter button.

To stop the bike, I flip the ESS to "off," stopping the engine. Then I take my hand off the grip and turn the key to "off".

Some possible advantages I see to leaving the bike parked with the ESS "off" and/or getting in the habit of integrating it into the start/stop procedure:

1) If you forget and accidentally leave the key in the ignition, leaving the ESS in the off position might fool/foil a thief who forgets to check it in his haste/anxiety.

2) If you are not in the habit of flipping the ESS to "on" when you start your bike, you could yourself be stumped if a mischievous passerby flips it to "off" while you're not looking. I have known of at least two people whose bike "wouldn't start" when in reality the ESS was off and they didn't realize it. In one case, it caused embarrassment for a few minutes. In the other case, the person had their bike hauled in for service only to discover that nothing was wrong with the bike.

3) To help keep the ESS switch contacts clean. I have to think that most modern switches are designed with some amount of self-cleaning or wiping action built into their operating motion. If the switch just sits there in the "on" position all the time, the contacts could just oxidize and over time possibly become intermittent. I just ran across an advertisement for an older Honda that said "Runs great. Only issue is that sometimes hitting a big bump will cause the engine to shut off." I wondered if it could have been dirty/intermittent contacts on the ESS.

4) At the gas/petrol station, as usual I stop the engine using the ESS. At this point the key is still "on", which allows me to read and then reset the trip odometer while the engine remains safely turned off. Conversely, if I used the key to stop the engine, I would then have to immediately turn the key back on and wait for the computer/dashboard to boot back up so I could fiddle with the trip odometer, or else wait until I'm ready to leave to turn the bike back on to read and reset the odometer. However, I like to do all of my fuel mileage reporting (via texting to fuelly.com) after fueling and before I turn the bike back on.

I'm not advocating one way or the other, just offering up what I do and why I do it. If I have any problems with the reliability/longevity of the ESS, I'll report it.
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Old 08-01-2013, 02:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HMenke View Post
... On a dirt bike, I always press the kill switch to stop the engine because I like to keep both hands on the grips while the engine is running...
"Dirt bikes", or off-road bikes typically only have a kill switch and do not have an ignition key switch, so the kill switch is the only way to stop the engine (aside from using the choke to kill the engine). And the type of kill switch used on the majority of off-road bikes is a momentary "push and hold" type of switch... when you push the kill switch button and hold it down, all you are essentially doing is grounding out the ignition circuit. These types of momentary kill switches do not have the moving parts and therefore the potential for wear like the typical street legal bike with an ESS and ignition key switch does.

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Old 08-01-2013, 02:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoMike View Post
"Dirt bikes", or off-road bikes typically only have a kill switch and do not have an ignition key switch, so the kill switch is the only way to stop the engine (aside from using the choke to kill the engine). And the type of kill switch used on the majority of off-road bikes is a momentary "push and hold" type of switch.
Ignition key switches on off-road bikes might be getting more common, perhaps as a theft deterrent? Our stable:

'04 Yamaha TTR90E: keyed ignition switch, momentary kill switch, momentary electric start
'07 Honda CRF80F: keyed ignition switch, momentary kill switch, kick start
'08 Honda CRF150F: keyed ignition switch, momentary kill switch, momentary electric start
'09 Honda CRF230F: keyed ignition switch, momentary kill switch, momentary electric start

Interesting that the off-road type momentary grounding kill switches are not fail safe: if they fail to make solid electrical contact, or the lead-in wire breaks...they won't function. I had to replace the switch on the TTR90E when it stopped working and wouldn't ground the ignition. In the meantime we just used the key switch to shut off the engine until we got it fixed.
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Old 08-01-2013, 03:11 PM
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I have about the same problem

Hi guys,

This is my first post so hello to all!

I have a 2011 CBR 250 R ABS bought in Germany and my guarantee ended in May this year.

Because of the cold winter in Germany I could ride the bike only at the begging of June, after some weeks outside (2, 3 rides per week x 1 hour) I put it in a garage and left it for three weeks.

When I went to take it to my actual city the battery was dead (never been in two years), I cold started it and drove it to the van, when I got it down from the van (after a day) still no power.

Long story short : I bought and charged a new battery, it worked a day or two and then dead again.

Took it to the Honda dealer in my city, twice, they said it works just fine and sent me home. My discharge value is 0.40 (should be 0.34 mA), the battery had 12.8 V after a week standing but could not start and the Coil/Stator/R&R tests like in the Service Manual were ok.

After some research I have bought a new Regulator&Rectifier which has given always problems to Hondas, installed it and now just wait for the battery to be completely charged again in order to start it.

Did anyone had this problem?

Any possible hint is much appreciated !

Last edited by Raz; 08-01-2013 at 03:25 PM. Reason: Some misspelled words :)
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