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post #1 of 36 Old 10-06-2013, 01:00 PM Thread Starter
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DIY Motorcycle Service: Basic Tools & Supplies

Basic Tools:

- Metric Hex Keys - 4,5, & 6mm

- Metric Combination & Box End Wrenches - 6,8,10,12,14,17,19, & 24mm

- Metric Sockets - Six Point, Standard & Deep - 1/4" Drive: 6,8, & 10mm - 3/8" Drive: 10,12,14,17,19, & 24mm

- 1/4" & 3/8" Drive Standard Ratcheting Handles

- 1/4" & 3/8" Extensions (various lengths, including wobble type)

- 1/4" Drive Ratcheting Driver Handle ("T" or screwdriver style)

- 3/8" Drive Breaker Bar or T-Bar Handle

- 3/8" Drive Torque Wrench (click type)

- Honda Spark Plug Socket Wrench - P/N 89216-MAT-000

- Japanese Industrial Standard Screwdrivers

- Needle Nose Pliers, Standard & Long Reach

- Slip Joint Pliers, Standard

- Hammers: Dead blow; Plastic/Rubber Head; Ball Peen

- Punch Set

- Snap-On Pick Set

- Rear Shock Spanner

- Angled Feeler Gauge Set, Tapered Blades

- Digital Multimeter

- Battery Tender (or other small charger suitable for motorcycle batteries)

- Flexible LED Inspection Light

- Small Inspection Mirror

- Utility Knife (and extra blades)

- Ruler & Tape Measure

- Long Reach Tweezers

- Magnetic Pickup Tool

- Control Cable Lubrication Tool

- Chain Breaker Tool

- Plastic Bristle Chain Cleaning Brush & Toothbrushes

- Small Long Reach Funnel

- Clear Vinyl Hose (small diameter, for bleeding brake calipers)

- Oil Drain Pan, Clean Drain Pan/Containers (for engine coolant, brake bleeding, etc.)

- Tire Pressure Gauge (dial or digital)

- Tire Valve Chuck, Blower Attachment, Air Hose

- Small Air Compressor (1.5 HP, 2 Gal., 120 PSI)

- Heavy Duty Tie Downs, Soft Hooks, & HD Eye Lag Bolts (to suspend front end of bike from garage rafters, for front suspension work)

- Rear Wheel Paddock Stand

- Model Specific Factory Service Manual

- Notebook & Pens/Pencils

Expendable Supplies:

- Anti-Seize Compound (for most bolt & screw threads)

- Loctite Thread Lock, Medium & High Strength (for specific applications)

- Water Proof Wheel Bearing Grease

- High-Temp Black RTV Silicone

- Handgrip Cement

- DOT 4 Brake Fluid

- Aerosol Brake Cleaner

- Engine Coolant

- O-Ring Safe Chain Lubricant

- Kerosene (for drive chain & misc. parts cleaning)

- WD-40

- Paint Pen, White or Yellow (for marking critical torqued fasteners)

- Shop Towels (paper & cloth)

- Oil Absorbent "Pig Mat" (or plastic sheeting, for oil filter changes and lubing drive chain)

- Latex Gloves and/or Hand Cleaner

Former Factory Test Rider/Technician

Last edited by MotoMike; 10-21-2013 at 10:53 AM. Reason: Additions
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post #2 of 36 Old 10-06-2013, 01:55 PM
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That is an excellent tool kit to have.

Another nice thing about Honda that may go unnoticed is things like clutch cable adjustment and rear axel nuts are two different sizes so you don't need two of any tool for common maintenance items.

. . . a timely list, after many years I find my self filling a tool box with tools for motorcycle maintenance.

. . . It's pointless to race between Starbucks', around here they are 300 yards apart!
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post #3 of 36 Old 10-06-2013, 03:46 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rory_L View Post
That is an excellent tool kit to have.

Another nice thing about Honda that may go unnoticed is things like clutch cable adjustment and rear axel nuts are two different sizes so you don't need two of any tool for common maintenance items.

. . . a timely list, after many years I find my self filling a tool box with tools for motorcycle maintenance.
Yeah, I'd thought of writing up a list of service tools & supplies before, but just hadn't gotten around to it. Another post here earlier today prompted me to stop procrastinating and just do it, and post it up as a sticky for easier reference.

It's kind of tough to just go out and get everything you will eventually need, all at once. A fair number of my tools were acquired piece meal over the years, when I was working as a motorcycle & snowmobile technician. I've bought a few metric wrenches which are somewhat more specialized, just to work on a specific bolt or nut on certain models... like a long reach, thin 10mm Snap-On combo wrench to get into particularly tight areas. I've also taken various sized wrenches and cut them, then re-welded the open or box end to a different angle or offset needed for a specific application. I call these "cheater" wrenches, as they have saved a lot of time by not having to disassemble other parts just to get to the fasteners that are needed to be removed for the job.

Anyway, hopefully this list will be useful to those who want to get a little grease under their fingernails, and enjoy the satisfaction of working on their own bikes.

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post #4 of 36 Old 10-06-2013, 04:14 PM
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Holy smokes. I was just thinking about asking someone "experienced" to post a list of recommended tools and products. So thanks, Mike!

Which anti-seize type(s) would you recommend? And which bearing grease?

Also where would the high temp silicone be used? I've never even heard of this.

And (just a suggestion to complete the list), what basic cleaner/wash/wax products are actually good to have for the CBR, without going overboard on product?

Thanks again.
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post #5 of 36 Old 10-06-2013, 04:43 PM
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Except for the JIS Screwdrivers, cable lube tool, and kerosene (and maybe one or two other items, I already have most of these items . . but not in one place.

. . . It's pointless to race between Starbucks', around here they are 300 yards apart!
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post #6 of 36 Old 10-06-2013, 05:10 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CO 250R View Post
Holy smokes. I was just thinking about asking someone "experienced" to post a list of recommended tools and products. So thanks, Mike!

Which anti-seize type(s) would you recommend?
Permatex is a brand commonly found at most auto parts stores. About $8 for an 8 oz jar.

Quote:
And which bearing grease?
I like Bel-Ray's Water Proof Bearing Grease. It's sold in a plastic tub, about $10 at well stocked motorcycle shops.

Quote:
Also where would the high temp silicone be used? I've never even heard of this.
On the CBR250R it's specifically used on the valve cover gasket, at the corners of the semi-circular sections of the gasket. It's also a Permatex product, available at auto parts stores.

BTW, despite that the service manual recommends replacing this gasket when doing the Valve Clearance Inspection, it can be reused as long as it's in good condition. I've done three VCI's on my bike, reusing the original gasket each time.

Quote:
And (just a suggestion to complete the list), what basic cleaner/wash/wax products are actually good to have for the CBR, without going overboard on product?
Honda Spray Cleaner & Polish works well and is inexpensive, about $5 for a 12 oz. spray can. I'm way too lazy when it comes to using a paste type of wax... I'd rather spend that time riding. Besides, the bike is just going to get dirty again.

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post #7 of 36 Old 10-06-2013, 09:19 PM
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I would suggest adding Loctite thread locker to the list also.
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post #8 of 36 Old 10-06-2013, 10:31 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 600k2 View Post
I would suggest adding Loctite thread locker to the list also.
Yeah, I left Loctite off the list intentionally. Thanks to Aufitt's advise, I've switched to using anti-seize compound on most fasteners, particularly those that are frequently removed. There are some internal engine applications that call for specific grades of Loctite, but for the majority of regular nuts & bolts I've been using anti-seize. I think anti-seize has a lot of advantages over Loctite... easier to loosen fasteners; resistant to thread galling and corrosion in dissimilar metals (which has always been a big issue with steel plated bolts & screws threading into aluminum cases); cleaner threads, especially important with female aluminum case threads.

But yes, Loctite Thread Lock certainly has its specific applications. Added to the list.

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Last edited by MotoMike; 10-06-2013 at 11:25 PM.
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post #9 of 36 Old 10-07-2013, 04:21 AM
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What about sliding tommy bars/T bar.
I find these useful for applying a controlled amount of force with two hands on bigger fasteners. Also the sliding action makes it easier to use than a ratchet (which I don't have).

David.

Black CBR250RAB ABS Bought Jan 2013
Life long Cyclist.
University Electronics Tech.
Motorcycle tinkerer.
Trekkie

Last edited by djsb; 10-07-2013 at 04:28 AM.
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post #10 of 36 Old 10-07-2013, 11:43 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djsb View Post
What about sliding tommy bars/T bar.
I find these useful for applying a controlled amount of force with two hands on bigger fasteners. Also the sliding action makes it easier to use than a ratchet (which I don't have).

David.
Thanks for the suggestion David... added to the list.

There are a lot of additional tools which are definitely nice to have when working on a bike. Just within the category of Socket Tools, the variety of different handles, adaptors, and extensions is incredible. Things like Speeder Handles, Breaker Bar Handles, T-Bar handles, Wobble Extensions, Flexible Extensions, Drive Adaptors, and Crows Foot Wrenches, to name just a few, are handy tools to have.

As I was putting this list together, I wanted to keep the idea of "basic tools" in mind, without going overboard into a lot of specialty tools... one could put together a whole separate list of specialty tools and equipment under the heading of Engine Rebuilding & Repair.

For example, in my own tool cabinet I have a lot of tools which I didn't include in the list... things like Dial Indicators, Vernier Calipers, Micrometers, Compression Gauge Set, Rethreading Set, Helicoil Kit, various Flex Hones, Ammco Rigid Hone, Mighty-Vac Brake Bleeder, Seal Drivers, Bearing Pullers, various Pneumatic Tools, Drive Chain Tools, and the list goes on. Back when I was spinning wrenches for a living, all these tools were used fairly often and eventually paid for themselves. While they are nice to have, most of these expensive tools just sit in my roller cabinet and rarely get used. Obviously, unless a person is making their living working as motorcycle technician, most of these advanced and specialized tools would not necessarily be a good investment for someone who's main goal is to perform basic service & maintenance on their own bike.

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Last edited by MotoMike; 10-07-2013 at 02:06 PM.
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