Battery took a poop after lights on for 2 hrs - Honda CBR250R Forum : Honda CBR 250 Forums
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post #1 of 7 Old 04-13-2014, 12:06 AM Thread Starter
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Angry Battery took a poop after lights on for 2 hrs

So to make things short, I have a brand spankin new '13. I've been on the bike for 2 weeks now, using it everyday. I decided to go to the movies with my girlfriend and my little brother, we were running late and when I parked my bike into my garage I must have left the key on the ignition. Anyways, I was home in no more than 2-3 hours (we saw the new captain america, and it was AWESOME). I tried charging the battery with a tender (for 1.5 hours) and it didn't work. So then I did a hill start and got it going, however after a couple of minutes the bike cut off again, so I rolled it down a hill again and got it on, just to have it turn off on me again. I'm new to the ride life but I have done work with cars before, I never heard/saw any NEW battery fully dying with only 2-3 hours left on. Is it just me or did my dealer give me a dead battery? HELP!
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post #2 of 7 Old 04-13-2014, 12:15 AM
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That's not completely out of the ordinary.

Most likely you will need to charge it at a higher than normal rate, and monitor it, to get it to start accepting a charge if it's below 10V. A Tender may not be able to supply enough Amps, but you could leave it on for a day and see what it does.

It will take a significant amount of time to charge if it's completely dead - possibly something like 12 hours at 2 Amps (depending on the size of the battery). Always keep track of how hot the battery is getting while charging, and back the Amps down if it gets very hot to the touch.
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post #3 of 7 Old 04-13-2014, 12:24 AM
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Agreed, a tender will not bring a totally discharged battery back to life.
I'm not sure if these are sealed batteries, but you will want to check the acid level if possible. And use no more than a 1 amp (edit: or 2!) charger for a small lead acid battery like this.

These are VERY small batteries. No where near the capacity of an automobile battery.


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post #4 of 7 Old 04-13-2014, 12:44 AM
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A Battery Tender is really a maintenance charger, and not intended for use in recharging a completely flat battery (particularly in an hour and a half... it just can't do it).

With the ignition key left on in the RUN position, all the lights are powered up, which is all it takes to drain one of these small batteries. You should be able to recharge your battery, but it will take a regular battery charger to do it (one that can be set to a 2 amp charge rate, and will switch to a maintenance mode once the battery is fully charged is ideal).

As far as not being able to 'bump' start the bike, that is due to a lack of sufficient battery voltage available to power the ECM, PMG-FI, and Fuel Pump, in addition to all the other electrical components (lights, instrument cluster, etc.) demanding power at the same time. Bump starting simply doesn't work on a fuel injected bike with a completely dead battery, whereas a carbureted bike with a dead battery can generally be bump started without a problem and will continue run with out stalling (although often the headlight may be dim and turn signals are typically inoperable). The electrical system of the CBR250R requires a battery which has a least 12.3V... battery voltage measuring below 12.3V requires the battery to be recharged. Normal voltage for a fully charged battery is 13.0 to 13.2 volts.

I use one of these Schumacher chargers (set to 2 amps for motorcycle batteries)...



They can be bought for about $35 USD

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post #5 of 7 Old 04-13-2014, 01:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoMike View Post
I use one of these Schumacher chargers (set to 2 amps for motorcycle batteries)...



They can be bought for about $35 USD
That's probably what you would need to bring that battery back to life.

Read your voltage before charging. You could try 2A for a couple hours to see if the voltage comes up, but if it didn't you'd need to push it harder - like 6A - but not for too long. Too much heat is a problem, and an indicator of overcharging. Once it started to get warm I'd back it down to 2A and continue charging.

Monitor the temp of the battery and the voltage. When a battery comes right off a charger it will read high (13+V) initially, but will stabilize after sitting for an hour or so - that's when you can get a true reading.

A 12V battery should read 12.7V when full charged (after sitting). 12.0V is under a 50% charge.

Last edited by jkv357; 04-13-2014 at 01:16 AM.
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post #6 of 7 Old 04-13-2014, 12:16 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks everyone! I'll stop by Autozone today and see if they have a charger I can pick up, I'll continue to post if I have any problems.
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post #7 of 7 Old 04-13-2014, 07:15 PM
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had mine drain thru leaving the key in,
seemed lifeless, tried clutch starting
[live on a nice sloped street] which worked
- altho as op mentioned, as soon as she fired
i took revs up to sustainable level [say 5]
stopped, continued around the block keeping
revs up esp when starting, high revs, smooth clutch,
then continued riding around the block for a while..

tested normal revs and clutch while at the top end of
the block, for a nice long downhill run just in case..
[if your on the flat, dont stop til on a long slope]
then clutch started her daily [again parked on a
long slope] where she started again, running clutch
start.. kept doing this for a 5 days or so before
attempting use of the starter, which worked..

this happened twice with a good break in between..
same response with similar outcomes..

clutching when battery seems flat requires a good
run-up on a slope for preference.. i happen to have
experience with clutching bikes so it was easy,
but you need to be able to run, besides the bike
[if road rises in its center, run on the highest side,
for me throttle side], in second gear, clutch in, until good
speed [when you cant run faster, say] then jumping on
either side saddle feet same side [better focus of weight]
or swinging other leg over while leaping aboard if you cant
or dont feel confident with side saddle jump..

if no slope and cant run/push to reasonable speed
you need someone to help push from behind..
they should continue pushing into the start..
[until clutch in, throttle up, brakes on]

running and jumping [or standing up on pegs
being pushed while already aboard] require
dropping into saddle - as you drop the clutch -
to add maximum potential weight/mass into
bikes moving mass to help turn engine/wheel..

if you cant get some speed up at first, resulting
in dropping clutch only locking the rear wheel,
try next gear up [3rd] with better run-up..
[priority is the run-up speed/momentum]

charger/tender advice is of course relevant,
but there is a case for clutch starting, which
at least gets you going again there and then..

mine showed no life when i tried the ignition,
so it was effectively, 'dead' whatever that
means in technological terms..
yet she still fired up with a good clutch start,
and continued - with throttle holding revs -
which resulted after a weeks clutching
[thinking of not loading battery]
then started as usual..

anyway, i reckon a running clutch start
is well worth the minimal effort required
which is basically getting up to a good
pace before dropping the clutch..
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