Changing tires yourself - Honda CBR250R Forum : Honda CBR 250 Forums
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post #1 of 11 Old 07-07-2016, 07:32 PM Thread Starter
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Changing tires yourself

So I'm thinking of changing my own tires. I watched a couple YouTube videos and it looks like people do this.

I bought tires with 150 miles on them from a fellow member and my local shop won't put them on my bike as they are used.
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post #2 of 11 Old 07-07-2016, 07:34 PM Thread Starter
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The videos mention all the tools I need to swap the tires. But I still need to learn how to take off the tires and open the chain. I never did anything like this before. And I'm wondering if it's worth it to do myself or shop around for another shop that will put on my slightly used tires.
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post #3 of 11 Old 07-07-2016, 11:01 PM
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I went to my Honda motorsports dealer and for $160 they changed the tires (I bought them, but bought them new, so they legally could put them on... they didn't care if I was the one who bought them), new valve stems, disposal fee, chain clean/lube, and oil change/filter.

for me NOT having to do all the work, the $160 was worth it (and I got to test ride the Africa Twin! lovely thing that is!!!) but it's all up to you, how much you want to spend, and how much work you want to do on it.

good luck!

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post #4 of 11 Old 07-08-2016, 05:22 AM Thread Starter
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I would gladly pay $160 for chain clean and line, oil change and tire swap. But I worry they won't toss on my tires because of the 150 miles already on them. so I might have to find a smaller shop to go to.
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post #5 of 11 Old 07-08-2016, 10:10 AM
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You don't have to cut the chain to remove the rear wheel. Just loosen the chain adjuster and axle, push the wheel forward, and you can pull the chain off the sprocket.

I attempted to change mine (done many mower tires before) and even bought a bead breaker to do so with, but it still didn't work well. So what I did was buy the tires, remove the wheels (bike on front fork and rear swingarm stands), took the wheels and tires to a local tire shop that will remove and remount for $15 a tire. $30 later and I'm set for another 20k miles.

If I were you, that'd be the route I'd take. $160 to remove and remount 2 tires is pretty steep, even with an oil change (~$12 in parts).

Tis better to be thought a fool and remain silent, than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt.
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post #6 of 11 Old 07-08-2016, 01:17 PM
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I change mine all the time. First time is a bit of work as you get used to the tricks, but then its easy.

Taking the front tire off is a snap. (i) put the bike on some sort of block/lift so tire is off the ground (padock stands are perfect for this - a cheap set is $70 on fleabay), (ii) unscrew axle nut, (iii) remove axle while supporting tire, and (iv) slip tire down so brake rotor slides out of calipers. Don't lose or mix up your spacers.

Rear tire is the same, only replace (iv) above with - (iv) push rear tire forward on bike until you can remove the chain from the sprockets (may have to rotate tire an inch or two), and set chain on swingarm, and (v) pull tire back out of swingarm until you can remove rear brake calipers (set them on the swingarm).

Now actually changing the tire takes some work. Are you doing it with just tire irons, or buying a system?

Putting rims/tires back on the bike is a reversal of the above, with the following hints for the rear: Get a friend to help - don't try it alone for your first time. Spread the rear brake pads slightly before you start. Also, make sure the rear cush drive is firmly seated on the rim (otherwise the tire is too wide and you have problems getting the rear brake caliper harness to sit still). Have your friend hold the rear brake assembly in place on the swingarm. Carefully roll the rear tire in, so that the rear brake rotor just slides between the brake pads. Roll it all the way forward on the ground to put the chain back on the sprockets. Re-check the rear brake assembly to make sure you haven't pushed it out of whack (this is where a friend is very helpful - yell at them and tell them to hold it in place; yell again). Now, sit behind the tire and use your feet under the tire (with your hands guiding the tire) to carefully lift it with the spacers fitting between the swingarms until the axle hole lines up with the chain adjuster holes on the swingarm. This is the hardest part. Once there, have your friend let go of the brake assembly and slide the axle in.

Now just tighten everything to spec. Easy once you've done it a few times. Good luck. (I believe everyone should know how to do this. Just so everyone can share my initial learning pains.)

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post #7 of 11 Old 07-08-2016, 01:39 PM
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I see you already have info on getting the wheel(s) off, so I'll add this:

I've found that the tire changer + motorcycle tire attachment from Harbor Freight work pretty well, both for breaking the bead and removing the old tire and for holding the wheel while you install the new one.

Manual Tire Changer Motorcycle Tire Changer Attachment

You also need a couple of tire irons, some tire lube (I got mine at Fleet Farm -- a lifetime supply for under ten bux, as I recall) and some strips of something like plastic coffee cans or plastic detergent bottles to protect the rims while you're putting on the new tire.

It also helps to let the new tire sit out in the sun and get nice and warm before you start putting it on.

Before I had a source of compressed air I used a rope wrapped around the tire tread and twisted like a tourniquet to press the tire in so that the bead would seat when I pumped it up with a bicycle pump . . . but compressed air works a lot better.

Go slow and have fun; it's not that hard.
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post #8 of 11 Old 07-08-2016, 11:57 PM
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Life is too short to change tubeless tires manually. Ride more, curse less, wear fewer Band-Aids, and ride on rims without scratches.

I pull my wheels and take them and a new set of tires to the local Victory / Indian dealer who installs the tires and dynamically balances the wheels for $30 per rim, with no old tire disposal fee.
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post #9 of 11 Old 07-13-2016, 08:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stichill View Post
Life is too short to change tubeless tires manually. Ride more, curse less, wear fewer Band-Aids, and ride on rims without scratches.

I pull my wheels and take them and a new set of tires to the local Victory / Indian dealer who installs the tires and dynamically balances the wheels for $30 per rim, with no old tire disposal fee.
This. I'm too lazy to do it without a tire machine. Ideally would take the wheels and the bike to the shop but it tends to get expensive than.

"Not a shred of evidence exists in favor of the idea that life is serious." -Brendan Gill
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post #10 of 11 Old 07-13-2016, 10:10 PM Thread Starter
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You're right. I just talked to a shop and to have them swap the tires completely would be $150. This makes me want to think hard about what to do. But I'm glad I found a new mechanic who sounds like a keeper.
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