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  Topic Review (Newest First)
12-28-2018 06:56 AM
B7ACKTHORN A warm welcome from the other side of the word. Nevertheless, it's good to see that you're taking up something you loved eventually. I'd echo TrueFaith's comments, it's a torquey motor, but nevertheless still a sports bike which would mean she'd have to be revved eventually keep her at the boil. Ride safe!

Cheers!
VJ
12-27-2018 11:19 AM
eigo321 @Shroeder
Here in Japan, Christmas definitely isn't celebrated in the same way as in traditionally Christian countries. It isn't a national holiday and though many people buy presents for the kids, eat cake and even put up a tree, it's just doesn't have the same meaning. I'd put it on a par with Halloween and Valentine's Day - another event that the Japanese have adopted purely for the fun of it.
The most important event on the Japanese holiday calendar is New Year, just a few days away! I'll have a week off and am looking forward to the break from work, time with the family and some good food and wine
12-25-2018 06:35 AM
Schroeder @eigo321
Just out of curiosity, is Christmas celebrated much in Japan? I believe I once heard that the holiday was sort of adopted by the Japanese people but not in the religious context.
12-24-2018 09:24 AM
eigo321 Keith, I can't see any damage anywhere else on the bike; it's actually in very good condition with few scratches. Forks look straight enough though I guess you'd need to remove them to be sure. I came across an interesting video on You Tube that dealt with misaligned forks. In many cases it's the result of a bump - perhaps hitting a pothole - that causes the forks to twist in the yoke. Apparently it can be rectified by loosening all the bolts on the front forks bar the ones in the top yoke. Then it's a case of pumping the bars and twisting the forks until you get it all straightened up again, at which point you tighten the bolts up again. That's the theory, anyway. If anyone's interested, here's the link.

Either way, it's out of my hands for the time being. The bike went back to the shop on Saturday and I don't expect to see it again until the new year.
For now, it's Christmas Eve, and time for a mince pie.
Merry Christmas, one and all
12-19-2018 06:14 AM
Keith That handlebar's definitely not right, although if there are no scuff marks elsewhere on the bike I'd be prepared to believe it was the result of the bike being dropped at a standstill. It'd be worth checking the fork legs for straightness and the frame for flaking paint around the headstock which could indicate a frontal impact.
The LED problem is strange. Filament bulbs are well known for failing with time but LEDs pretty much go on for ever.
12-19-2018 02:30 AM
eigo321 Interesting to read all your comments, all of which I will take on board... but not for a while, unfortunately.
For the time being I am very much back out of the saddle. No, I haven't fallen off, though I think it's a safe bet that the previous owner did.
During my first ride out on Friday last I was concentrating on the road more than anything else. Sefty first!
Had another run out on Sunday - in much better weather - and was able to take a lot more in. First thing I noticed was that when riding in a straight line, the top yolk seemed to be pointing off to the left. Only a couple of degrees but in my book that's a few degrees too many. In fairness, the bike seemed to handle OK but it still doesn't seem right to me.
On arriving back home I had a good look around and noticed that the right hand bad had a definite bend in it. It was compensated for by the simple expedient of rotating the bar around the fork top. I'll try and post a pic if I can. Anyway, more bad news.
Finally, I switched on the ignition after dark and found that some of the console back light LEDs aren't working. By this time I'm not a happy camper.
Phoned the shop on Monday (several times). Got the impression that they weren't all that eager to help but eventually they agreed to pick the bike up and take it back for repairs. It's all left a bit of a bad taste in my mouth but I guess that's just the way it goes sometimes, especially with a used bike.
Hey ho. Christmas soon. 'Tis the season for goodwill so I will try to administer some
12-17-2018 07:58 PM
TrueFaith
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith View Post
I guess whatever you're doing, one of the biggest hazards is overconfidence.
Oh believe me I have a healthy respect for the dangers of over confidence, thanks to several years of skydiving in my younger days.
If there's one sport that offers no "do-overs" to the over confident it's that one and the lessons learned tend to stick with you throughout your life.
12-17-2018 11:54 AM
Keith
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueFaith View Post
........roads............ that are in good shape and with minimal traffic. Luckily I live in an area where those kind of roads abound in all directions.
There are very few of those round here in the south of England, particularly in the summer when the area's full to bursting with tourists and day trippers.

Yes, I've also hurt myself worse on bicycles than motorcycles excepting the broken collarbone in a lowside when I was 17. I also managed to dislocate my shoulder and snap three tendons diving off a cruise boat just three years ago so I guess whatever you're doing, one of the biggest hazards is overconfidence.
12-17-2018 11:25 AM
TrueFaith
Quote:
Originally Posted by Keith View Post
It appears that you and I ride bikes for quite different reasons. I can see the attraction in honing your riding skills on a race track but race tracks have predictable, well maintained surfaces and open run-off areas. Roads have kerbs, potholes, and trees and rocks lining the corners, not to mention other traffic. Personally I value my health and well-being too much to ride without a large margin for dealing with the unexpected. When I want to push myself I do it on my mountain bikes where I know the speeds are going to be lower and the landings softer (very soft at the moment with all the rain we've had recently).
Here's a quick video example from a couple of weeks ago. None of the others there attempted the same.
Note, the video is on Facebook so the link will most likely not stay valid for ever.
I think you're assuming too much. My credo on a motorcycle has always been "don't ride faster than you're willing to crash". I've only had one crash in over 36 years of riding motorcycles and that was a slow-speed lowside on gravel at only 30mph. In fact the only time I've been seriously injured or broken bones on two wheels has been on mountain and road bicycles, not motorcycles and those accidents were also at comparatively slow speeds.
Bringing out the potential of the CBR on curvy roads does not always mean you are breaking the speed limit or riding like a demon. You can still have plenty of fun on the right roads keeping the revs up and carving corners without seriously violating local traffic laws. If and when I do open things up it's always on roads that I am intimately familiar with, that are in good shape and with minimal traffic. Luckily I live in an area where those kind of roads abound in all directions. I never ride my CBR on public roads like I would ride it at a closed track. That's probably why I've had exactly zero speeding violations in over 3 decades of riding motorcycles.
12-17-2018 08:22 AM
Keith
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueFaith View Post

The entire point in that kind of situation is to use judicious downshifting and trail braking inputs in order to keep the motor up in the high RPMs as smoothly as possible. Yes, the CBR has great torque available in certain situations, but you shouldn't have to rely on it to correct bad entrances or bad lines if you're thinking ahead and riding the bike properly by keeping the revs up. YOU may have to work a little harder to bring out the full potential of the CBR's engine, but once you've done it a few times there's no going back to lower RPMs and it becomes clear why the CBR is capable of humiliating much bigger bikes on everything but a straightaway.
It appears that you and I ride bikes for quite different reasons. I can see the attraction in honing your riding skills on a race track but race tracks have predictable, well maintained surfaces and open run-off areas. Roads have kerbs, potholes, and trees and rocks lining the corners, not to mention other traffic. Personally I value my health and well-being too much to ride without a large margin for dealing with the unexpected. When I want to push myself I do it on my mountain bikes where I know the speeds are going to be lower and the landings softer (very soft at the moment with all the rain we've had recently).
Here's a quick video example from a couple of weeks ago. None of the others there attempted the same.
Note, the video is on Facebook so the link will most likely not stay valid for ever.
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