Who upgraded to CBR 300 or 500? - Page 2 - Honda CBR250R Forum : Honda CBR 250 Forums
User Tag List

 14Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 39 Old 08-14-2016, 03:05 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 15
Thanks: 8
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
I went from 600RR to 500F because of the seating position. I also own a 300R and used to own a 250 R and a 125R, I can easily say that the 300 to 500 is a nice little upgrade, but you'll get bored of it easily.

It sucks to say since it's not a Honda, but a NICE upgrade and something that will keep you happy for the years to come, would be the Yamaha FZ-07.

I'm planning to change my 500 to an FZ-07 or FZ-09 in the near future.

After riding a 2016 FZ-07, here's the verdict:

Pros:
- Same seating position as the CB500F.
- Way better braking. (dual calipers in the front makes all the difference)
- Better acceleration (it's got more power, which is a given)
- Rides smoother throughout any gear, which makes over taking a breeze.
- The gears engage easier. (did not expect that!)
- It's the easiest oil change! Everything is on the left side of the bike. (Drain bolt, oil filter, oil level indicator and the oil top up)
- It can wheelie rather easily without even pinning it all the way. (For those that want to start stunting)
- Fancier cluster (tells you outside temp and engine temp, both of which is not available on the Honda).
- Comes with straps so that you can tie down stuff on the rear seat. That's standard as opposed to Honda, which it is an option.


Cons for the FZ-07:
- The CB500F has the LED head light (Put a projector on the FZ-07 and this con will be gone)
- The blinker switch is much more convenient on the CB500F (I'm sure it just takes some getting used to on the FZ-07) since it is super small on the FZ-07.
- The trunk space is MUCH bigger on the CB500F, not so important to me, but to others it may be.
- The start/kill switch takes some getting used to.
- The CB500F has a better key.
- The CB500F has adjustable front forks.
- The CB500F has solid turn signals, unlike the FZ-07 that are flapping around with the wind.

Both bikes have high attention to detail, therefore the looks is neither in the pros or cons, since that is totally up to the buyer. The color scheme on the Yamaha is larger than the Honda, but again, that's personal taste.

The price for both bikes is the same here (Montreal). I'll try the FZ-09 before buying one, since I have a feeling that's a keeper!

And to sum it up, the Honda 500 has what the Honda 300 is missing but the FZ-07 has what the Honda 500 is missing.

I hope this helps!
George Type-S is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 39 Old 08-14-2016, 04:34 AM
Senior Member
 
Schroeder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Germany
Posts: 1,795
Thanks: 206
Thanked 354 Times in 291 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by George Type-S View Post
I can easily say that the 300 to 500 is a nice little upgrade, but you'll get bored of it easily.
Depends on your personal preferences.
I've been riding the little 250 for three years now and can't say I'm getting bored of it.
CBR250R likes this.

My computer is fighting Aids and Cancer in it's idle time, and yours?
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Schroeder is online now  
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Schroeder For This Useful Post:
cbrlocal (08-14-2016)
post #13 of 39 Old 08-14-2016, 06:30 AM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Te Anau, New Zealand
Posts: 242
Thanks: 17
Thanked 33 Times in 30 Posts
I upgraded from 250R to 300R nearly two years ago.

My thinking at the time was that I liked the handling and light weight of the 250R but felt it could do with a touch more power.
So when the 300R was offering that same nice package with 17% more power and (IMO) better styling I was in.
I sold my 250R privately for a good price so there was no financial hit either.

Ive been happy with the 300R but are now looking towards the next model release expectantly.

2013 CBR250R repsol (sold)
2014 CBR300R (sold)
2007 SV650 (track bike)
2004 XR250R (dirt bike)
2018 Ninja 400
kiwi rider is offline  
 
post #14 of 39 Old 08-14-2016, 11:21 AM
Super Moderator
 
MotoMike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: 9000 ft. ASL in Southwest Colorado, USA
Posts: 6,888
Thanks: 1,433
Thanked 3,643 Times in 1,938 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueFaith View Post
Would that be the "oft rumored" CBR350RR you're talking about, Mike?
I wish we'd get something a little more solid than rumors and photoshops from the other side of the world about that one.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nithesh View Post
You realize that its not just "rumors" and Honda had officially unveiled the concept at Tokyo Motor Show last year?
The bike is due for a Indo/Thai launch by the end of this year. Parts are already sourced from vendors and you can already see what the headlight looks like for it. Next month its scheduled to be running a pre-production test so if it all goes as per plan you might see it in flesh as early as October 2016.
@Nithesh... TrueFaith was referring to the rumor of a 300 to 350cc version of the CBR250RR for non-Asian markets.

We all know by now that Asian markets will definitely get this new CBR250RR for next year. However nothing concrete has been said (beyond internet rumors and wishful thinking) regarding a larger displacement version being produced for western markets.

Former Factory Test Rider/Technician
MotoMike is online now  
post #15 of 39 Old 08-14-2016, 12:33 PM
Senior Member
 
TrueFaith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Brookfield, MA
Posts: 1,299
Thanks: 69
Thanked 438 Times in 281 Posts
Well, it's a process.
The success of the Ninja250R and Honda CBR250R led to 300cc versions of both. It also prompted Honda to expand it's 500cc line to offer more upgrade possibilities for those ready to go bigger from 250-300cc.
I wouldn't be surprised to see Yamaha take the same tack depending on how successful the R3 is.
I went for decades never believing that I'd see any of the "big 3" do sub-600cc sportbikes again, but the rising price of gas changed all that dramatically a few years ago.
Now gas is cheap again there's less motivation to make smaller bikes, but if they can continue to make small bikes attractive by adding technology and features previously only seen on much more expensive bigger bikes, who knows?
The market has surprised me once. Who's to say it won't again some day soon with 350-450cc bikes that have all the bells and whistles of today's 700-1000cc starships?
Many of those bikes are becoming price prohibitive for people wanting to upgrade. Pack all that tech in a lighter and cheaper alternative and you could open up a whole new market.
0oSPo0 likes this.
TrueFaith is offline  
post #16 of 39 Old 08-14-2016, 01:49 PM
Super Moderator
 
MotoMike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: 9000 ft. ASL in Southwest Colorado, USA
Posts: 6,888
Thanks: 1,433
Thanked 3,643 Times in 1,938 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueFaith View Post
Well, it's a process.
The success of the Ninja250R and Honda CBR250R led to 300cc versions of both. It also prompted Honda to expand it's 500cc line to offer more upgrade possibilities for those ready to go bigger from 250-300cc.
I wouldn't be surprised to see Yamaha take the same tack depending on how successful the R3 is.
I went for decades never believing that I'd see any of the "big 3" do sub-600cc sportbikes again, but the rising price of gas changed all that dramatically a few years ago.
Now gas is cheap again there's less motivation to make smaller bikes, but if they can continue to make small bikes attractive by adding technology and features previously only seen on much more expensive bigger bikes, who knows?
The market has surprised me once. Who's to say it won't again some day soon with 350-450cc bikes that have all the bells and whistles of today's 700-1000cc starships?
Many of those bikes are becoming price prohibitive for people wanting to upgrade. Pack all that tech in a lighter and cheaper alternative and you could open up a whole new market.
The problem with producing smaller displacement sport bikes (350-450cc) equipped with all the latest high tech bells & whistles (for example, fully adjustable front & rear suspensions, and massive aluminum box section frames, etc.) that their larger siblings come with as standard, is that the cost of doing so would put these small displacement bikes into a much higher price point segment. It comes down to the old adage of not being able to "have your cake and eat it too". Of course there will always be a few who would pay $8000 to $10,000 without blinking for something like a fully tricked out CBR400RR right off the showroom floor, but for the bean counters at a company like Honda such a bike would be a non-starter when it comes to marketing it to the masses in order to meet the required sales volume. And for Honda, they need to sell significant quantities of nearly every model they make, particularly the lower price point models.

A somewhat parallel example of this is the CBR600RR, which in the past several model years has had an MSRP approaching what the CBR1000RR MSRP is... for buyers who are willing and able to spend $13,000+ on a new super sport bike, many if not most will spend the extra $1000-1500 and go with the liter bike. Which in turn is one of the reasons Honda has dropped the 600RR from its model line. I also believe that with so many used 600 class sport bikes available, along with what seems to be a shift in owner demographics for the 600 super sport class, the pool of buyers for new 600's has probably shrunk to the point where Honda is simply no longer selling enough of them to justify continuing production, not to mention the ongoing R&D that is required to keep pace with other competitors in that segment. And with a few exceptions, Honda has always been a company that prefers to put the majority of its R&D money into all new products (think CRF1000L Africa Twin), rather than pouring it into tweaking existing products just to play the endless "catch up" game.
kiwi rider likes this.

Former Factory Test Rider/Technician

Last edited by MotoMike; 08-14-2016 at 03:02 PM. Reason: typo
MotoMike is online now  
post #17 of 39 Old 08-14-2016, 04:29 PM
Senior Member
 
TrueFaith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Brookfield, MA
Posts: 1,299
Thanks: 69
Thanked 438 Times in 281 Posts
All true, Mike, but I think it all depends on how high the cost of a tricked-out liter bike will go. An R1 at close to 17k and a GSX-R 1000 at 15k is serious cash and a hefty monthly payment for it's 20-something demographic. A lot of riders seem to be noticing that they'll never be able to use half that power anyway.
If someone can make a 400cc or 500cc that feels as fast as a 600 and has a ton of tech and standard options for a price at or below 10k, perhaps it would bring back a lot of people considering a liter bike just because there are so few technically superior options between a capable, but somewhat unexciting CBR500R and a Fireblade.
Literbike prices can only rise and I think that's going to create a demand for their technology to become more affordable.
I think there's going to have to be something to fill the gap between the CBR250RR and the CBR1000RR. The CBR500R just isn't exciting enough to be that bike and as you say the CBR600RR priced itself out of the market. A $9000-10000 CBR450RR or CBR500RR would be 3-4k less than the discontinued 600s and might well be an attractive product.
kiwi rider likes this.
TrueFaith is offline  
post #18 of 39 Old 08-14-2016, 06:21 PM
Super Moderator
 
MotoMike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: 9000 ft. ASL in Southwest Colorado, USA
Posts: 6,888
Thanks: 1,433
Thanked 3,643 Times in 1,938 Posts
Maybe, but I think that when the price point moves up close to the $10,000 and beyond range, that market segment comes with an entirely different buyer demographic. Let's face it, the vast majority of 20 year olds rarely have the means to buy a bike in this price range, let alone pay the astronomical insurance rates that go with it.

I have a hunch that many of those who do have the financial means to buy motorcycles in that $10k to $20k MSRP range, are older riders who are not even looking at Japanese liter sport bikes. And if they are looking high end sport bikes, it's just as likely to be something a bit more exotic, like a Ducati or BMW.

I also think that some of these affluent buyers are drawn to new 'outside the box' offerings, especially in the Adventure segment. Take a bike like the new Honda CRF1000L Africa Twin... $15,000 will buy an A-T equipped with a few key accessories like hard cases, ready for some serious adventure touring.

Former Factory Test Rider/Technician

Last edited by MotoMike; 08-14-2016 at 06:28 PM.
MotoMike is online now  
post #19 of 39 Old 08-14-2016, 06:31 PM
Senior Member
 
TrueFaith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Brookfield, MA
Posts: 1,299
Thanks: 69
Thanked 438 Times in 281 Posts
Yeah, you're probably right. I should probably shut up and be grateful for the choices we have these days in a depressed market.
Bikes used to be so utilitarian and functional, but we seem to be heading more towards them being expensive weekend toys.
TrueFaith is offline  
post #20 of 39 Old 08-14-2016, 08:23 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Te Anau, New Zealand
Posts: 242
Thanks: 17
Thanked 33 Times in 30 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueFaith View Post
Well, it's a process.
The success of the Ninja250R and Honda CBR250R led to 300cc versions of both. It also prompted Honda to expand it's 500cc line to offer more upgrade possibilities for those ready to go bigger from 250-300cc.
I wouldn't be surprised to see Yamaha take the same tack depending on how successful the R3 is.
I went for decades never believing that I'd see any of the "big 3" do sub-600cc sportbikes again, but the rising price of gas changed all that dramatically a few years ago.
Now gas is cheap again there's less motivation to make smaller bikes, but if they can continue to make small bikes attractive by adding technology and features previously only seen on much more expensive bigger bikes, who knows?
The market has surprised me once. Who's to say it won't again some day soon with 350-450cc bikes that have all the bells and whistles of today's 700-1000cc starships?
Many of those bikes are becoming price prohibitive for people wanting to upgrade. Pack all that tech in a lighter and cheaper alternative and you could open up a whole new market.
There are world markets where gas is always expensive (compared to the US) and small capacity bikes are more popular.
Funnily enough New Zealand is one of them, and the biggest selling bike in my country last year was... The R3.

The recently released MT-03 (R3 naked) has been topping the monthly sales charts since it's release too.

I believe there is a market in this country for a high spec sports bike of 350 - 500cc like you describe in your other post. I would buy one.

2013 CBR250R repsol (sold)
2014 CBR300R (sold)
2007 SV650 (track bike)
2004 XR250R (dirt bike)
2018 Ninja 400
kiwi rider is offline  
The Following User Says Thank You to kiwi rider For This Useful Post:
pricelister (03-07-2017)
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Honda CBR250R Forum : Honda CBR 250 Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome