Tell me about the honda CBR250rr - Honda CBR250R Forum : Honda CBR 250 Forums
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post #1 of 13 Old 09-07-2016, 11:30 PM Thread Starter
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Tell me about the honda CBR250rr

I have seen them around but always dismissed them because i didn't like the front aesthetic (im sure it was fine for its time).

But i see you can get tyga and 600rr kits for them which makes them look really nice. In my region you can get them pretty cheap so i dont know if i should "invest" in one.

I guess i'm asking if they are good bikes, What things seem to fail with them and how do they compare the my current bike CBR250R (2011).
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post #2 of 13 Old 09-08-2016, 01:35 AM
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Not a whole lot to compare between the older CBR250RR's and the CBR250R model that most of us here own, at least not much beyond the fact that both models are Honda motorcycles of the sport bike variety.

CBR250RR's have inline 4 cylinder engines, which crank out significantly more power at a much higher RPM's than what the single cylinder CBR250R puts out. Also, the RR models are carburated (equipped with 4 carbs), whereas the newer 250R is equipped with Electronic Fuel Injection. Which from a maintenance standpoint, it's important to understand that those 4 carbs must not only be synchronized together, but dealing with 4 carburators is more work when it comes to things like making adjustments for temperature & altitude changes, as well as when fuel quality issues and off season storage are thrown into the mix. In short, owners of these CBR250RR's would do well to be of the experienced and knowledgeable DIY sort, or be willing and able to pay someone who is to work on it for you... in other words, unlike the CBR250R you have now, the RR is not a "low maintenance" bike.
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Last edited by MotoMike; 09-08-2016 at 02:01 AM. Reason: clarification
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post #3 of 13 Old 09-08-2016, 02:40 AM
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Yes, when I removed the three-carburetor bank on my practically new Yamaha XS750 way back when (for no other reason except I was young and wanted to learn to work on my bike), I found out the importance of having silicon spray lubricant in my toolkit. (Mike knows why)
Besides the longevity, one of the main reasons I wanted a BMW in 1980 was because I was not all that great of a mechanic, and its two carburetors were separate and out in the open.

If you want a bike to tinker with, get a BMW airhead. I know a bunch of enthusiasts on the Eastern side of your continent.

A CBR250RR (4 cylinder - they now make a 2 cylinder w/the same name) would be a great 2nd or 3rd bike, if you are a good mechanic, or sinfully rich.
Normal people cannot afford to have their airhead serviced on a regular basis, either. Most folks I know rebuild their own gearboxes and final drives, which requires a lot of shimming and patience. But they are a joy to ride!

Shortly after I bought my R65 in 1980, one of my Japanese-riding co-workers told me that "BMW put the 'ugh' in ugly".
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, of course, but if I got my hands on a old CBR250RR, I would restore it to original.
I think some of the most beautiful plastic came out of the Eighties, but of course, I am an old man.
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post #4 of 13 Old 09-08-2016, 04:53 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoMike View Post
Not a whole lot to compare between the older CBR250RR's and the CBR250R model that most of us here own, at least not much beyond the fact that both models are Honda motorcycles of the sport bike variety.

CBR250RR's have inline 4 cylinder engines, which crank out significantly more power at a much higher RPM's than what the single cylinder CBR250R puts out. Also, the RR models are carburated (equipped with 4 carbs), whereas the newer 250R is equipped with Electronic Fuel Injection. Which from a maintenance standpoint, it's important to understand that those 4 carbs must not only be synchronized together, but dealing with 4 carburators is more work when it comes to things like making adjustments for temperature & altitude changes, as well as when fuel quality issues and off season storage are thrown into the mix. In short, owners of these CBR250RR's would do well to be of the experienced and knowledgeable DIY sort, or be willing and able to pay someone who is to work on it for you... in other words, unlike the CBR250R you have now, the RR is not a "low maintenance" bike.
Man, that was super insightful.

I initially wondered about how DFI vs Carb would impact performance and feel but i had no idea that it actually had 4 carbs. That sounds like a headache for maintenance and reliability...

Is that common for bikes of that era?

Years ago before i was riding, I inherited a 1984? VT250 and that only had one carby for the twin cylinders?

Last edited by Corey; 09-08-2016 at 04:59 AM.
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post #5 of 13 Old 09-08-2016, 11:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corey View Post
Man, that was super insightful.

I initially wondered about how DFI vs Carb would impact performance and feel but i had no idea that it actually had 4 carbs. That sounds like a headache for maintenance and reliability...

Is that common for bikes of that era?

Years ago before i was riding, I inherited a 1984? VT250 and that only had one carby for the twin cylinders?
Yes, whereas EFI has become a standard feature on the majority of today's full sized motorcycles, bikes from 30 years ago were all carburated.

The VT250 actually had 2 carb's... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_VT250

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post #6 of 13 Old 09-08-2016, 05:31 PM
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Corey, we are lucky as Australasians to have access to the 250 and 400 fours from the late eighties and early nineties as a lot of markets didnt get these bikes or only as a 'grey' import like in the UK.

My advice for the future would be if you see a good one going for a fair price then snap it up if your interested.
You wouldn't lose money on something like that.

As a rider of a GSXR400 I can assure you they are a whole lot of fun to ride. A completely different riding experience to the single cylinder CBR250. Your talking 19,000 RPM redline as opposed to 10,500! They sound awesome IMO.

But yeah, like Mike and co. said, they can be more mechanically challenging esp now they are all getting a little long in the tooth.

I had to rip my bank of carbs out and replace all the seals in them as they had got old and were leaking, and then get them back in that tight frame space again... I'd rather sit inside in the warm and poke sticks in my eyes than repeat that job.
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2013 CBR250R repsol (sold)
2014 CBR300R (sold)
2007 SV650 (track bike)
2004 XR250R (dirt bike)
2018 Ninja 400

Last edited by kiwi rider; 09-08-2016 at 11:51 PM. Reason: spelling
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post #7 of 13 Old 09-08-2016, 06:25 PM
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mate if you dont know they have carbs etc
then the go is you will need someone
to tune and do engine etc maintenance..

this is or was one of hondas statements
'see what we can do', which while a road bike
is also fairly no compromise, with up to 22,000rpm
etc in an inline 250cc 4 cylinder super sport bike..

theres one locally goes up a nearby hill [coogee]
sounds like he's killing it, but only going up
at surburban speed limit speed..
ie, its designed to function at high revs etc..

no doubt a honda classic, and they are still around
at fairly low miles [30k miles] but most much higher..
indicates enthusiast owners or others maintaining them..
if you can find one with lowish miles kept garaged etc
then as members note it would be an investment bike.

ive been eyeing them off for years, but have no garage
now or even decent tools.. check out this for sale list,
typically around 3 - 4 grand..
note one comment on 'bikesales'; 'i bought it to learn on
but its more of an animal than i anticipated' etc..

so bear in mind also that since lams there will have been
plenty of young blokes using them as lams bikes
- not the ideal consciencious owners..

still, if you have a garage, it would be worth it
to have one just to play with, and learn etc...

http://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/green...0rr/1122495608
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post #8 of 13 Old 09-08-2016, 07:35 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kiwi rider View Post
Corey, we are lucky as Australasians to have access to the 250 and 400 fours from the late eighties and early nineties as a lot of markets didnt get these bikes or only as a 'grey' import like in the UK... As a rider of a GSXR400 I can assure you they are a whole lot of fun to ride. A completely different riding experience to the single cylinder CBR250. Your talking 19,000 RPM redline as opposed to 10,500! They sound awesome IMO...
The only 400 inline four super sport that we in the U.S. had was the Yamaha FZR400. I was working at a Honda-Yamaha dealership at the time (mid to late eighties) and got to ride one we had as demo for a couple days... as you said, lots of fun putting that bike through its paces and hearing it scream.
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post #9 of 13 Old 09-09-2016, 12:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shisoshin View Post
mate if you dont know they have carbs etc
then the go is you will need someone
to tune and do engine etc maintenance..

this is or was one of hondas statements
'see what we can do', which while a road bike
is also fairly no compromise, with up to 22,000rpm
etc in an inline 250cc 4 cylinder super sport bike..

theres one locally goes up a nearby hill [coogee]
sounds like he's killing it, but only going up
at surburban speed limit speed..
ie, its designed to function at high revs etc..

no doubt a honda classic, and they are still around
at fairly low miles [30k miles] but most much higher..
indicates enthusiast owners or others maintaining them..
if you can find one with lowish miles kept garaged etc
then as members note it would be an investment bike.

ive been eyeing them off for years, but have no garage
now or even decent tools.. check out this for sale list,
typically around 3 - 4 grand..
note one comment on 'bikesales'; 'i bought it to learn on
but its more of an animal than i anticipated' etc..

so bear in mind also that since lams there will have been
plenty of young blokes using them as lams bikes
- not the ideal consciencious owners..

still, if you have a garage, it would be worth it
to have one just to play with, and learn etc...

Honda CBR250RR | Motorcycles | Gumtree Australia Bankstown Area - Greenacre | 1122495608
Some great tidy examples there, that one with only 26K kms is a bargin if legit milage.
Ive got some drool to clean up now.

One thing I like about my GSXR is that it was one of the few models that got USD front forks.

2013 CBR250R repsol (sold)
2014 CBR300R (sold)
2007 SV650 (track bike)
2004 XR250R (dirt bike)
2018 Ninja 400
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post #10 of 13 Old 09-09-2016, 08:16 PM
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there are plenty of these in sydney and melbourne
and early 400 super fours [sons eu version out front]
for australian motorcyclists to experience..

others with vision open to smaller bikes
could also have had these lovely honda
road motorcycles..

[ps - we also got the magic ducati
250, 350 & 450 singles]
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Last edited by shisoshin; 09-09-2016 at 08:18 PM. Reason: ps
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