Almost took out a Harley rider. - Page 2 - Honda CBR250R Forum : Honda CBR 250 Forums
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post #11 of 19 Old 07-19-2015, 11:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbrlocal View Post
I see that sticker all the time. On the bumpers of trucks. Right after they cut me off.
This. It's almost as clear a sign of a horrible driver as a handicap sticker. I've never understood this. *shrug*

edit: and it is 100% of the time on some oversized truck/SUV with (apparently) no operable turn indicators.
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post #12 of 19 Old 07-20-2015, 02:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbrlocal View Post
I see that sticker all the time. On the bumpers of trucks. Right after they cut me off.
Which just goes to prove...[see original post]


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(no affilliation)
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post #13 of 19 Old 07-20-2015, 06:09 AM
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Motorcycles are hard to see. Even to an avid and careful motorcyclist driver. All of the modern cars are going to some sort of ultra bright white front running lights which really work wonders. Change your headlight to an HID and add some LED's to the front of your bike. Ultra bright white lighting above 4,500K color temp is much more conspicuous than the yellowish 2,700K of a single 55 Watt halogen. Which is really not quite bright enough to see at night anyway.
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post #14 of 19 Old 07-20-2015, 06:48 AM
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Originally Posted by TrueFaith View Post
After he angrily roared off, my passenger (who apparently HAD seen him coming) stated that he was traveling at an excessive rate of speed for the city road. So what? More important was the fact that I had not seen him coming at all, even with a large fairing and headlight on his bike.

I never once considered telling this rider that I also rode, or dared to mention the adage many of us ride with that we should "ride like you're invisible".
It might've worked in your favor this time not to have actually shared your riding experience with him: he might've well just dragged you out of your car and beated you for actually knowing better

On a more serious note, from a learning standpoint, did you finally see the rider at some point (i.e. after the fact) prior to stopping [and getting chewed out]? Whether you did or not, do you think you would've seen him if he was wearing a high visibility jacket?
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post #15 of 19 Old 07-20-2015, 10:26 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by mbr View Post
It might've worked in your favor this time not to have actually shared your riding experience with him: he might've well just dragged you out of your car and beated you for actually knowing better

On a more serious note, from a learning standpoint, did you finally see the rider at some point (i.e. after the fact) prior to stopping [and getting chewed out]? Whether you did or not, do you think you would've seen him if he was wearing a high visibility jacket?
At no point did I see him.
My first inkling that I had cut him off at all was the sound of the (typically weak) stock bike horn and his tires chirping behind me as he grabbed his brakes after I had already made the turn.
This was a wide boulevard which provided a good, long line of sight. He must have been really booking it and I simply did not look far enough up the road to notice his approach.
Once I knew I had cut him off and he was behind me, I made a conscious effort NOT to brake at all (as some people will do when reacting to a situation like that) so as not to compound the problems I had already caused him. I waited until he came up beside me to slow and roll down the window.
I doubt very much that a high-viz jacket or vest would have made any difference at all. I wouldn't have been able to see much of it behind his large full stock Harley fairing anyway. His bike was bright metallic purple with a working headlight and if that didn't register from a distance I doubt a little high-viz material would have been noticed either.
I've always been skeptical about reports that say that a car driver's brain often does not register something as small as a bike when they're expecting to see cars, coupled with the tendency to scan approaching traffic too quickly before committing to a turn, that results in accidents. Not anymore.
I now know that when you're in a city traffic situation like that, your own mind and your own assumptions are your own worst enemy.
I EXPECTED to see cars coming and I EXPECTED to see them traveling at 30-35mph at that intersection because I was in a congested city traffic situation. When I saw neither of those inputs my brain and reflexes processed that into thinking that it was safe for me to proceed. Once your mind has convinced you the way is "clear", it may even subsequently interfere with your ability to spot a small moving object approaching at a high rate of speed or anything that doesn't closely fit the parameters of what you are EXPECTING to be there.
This is probably the most disturbing take-away from this situation for me. That I could make such a mistake when as a rider I have been exposed to and am aware that such things are possible, much more than your average automobile driver would be, yet I still reacted in an almost textbook fashion that could have easily caused injury or death to a fellow rider.
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post #16 of 19 Old 07-20-2015, 12:37 PM
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The fact that you were already completely straight in your lane before he slammed on his brakes tells me that he was going way too fast and did absolutely nothing preventative on his own part as he aproached the intersection even though I'm sure you were clearly visible to him. As a rider, one must learn to drive defensively. Just because you have the right of way doesn't automatically absolve you from your own responsibilities for safety.


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post #17 of 19 Old 07-20-2015, 01:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sendler View Post
The fact that you were already completely straight in your lane before he slammed on his brakes tells me that he was going way too fast and did absolutely nothing preventative on his own part as he aproached the intersection even though I'm sure you were clearly visible to him. As a rider, one must learn to drive defensively. Just because you have the right of way doesn't automatically absolve you from your own responsibilities for safety.
This ^

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I think the common ideas of "the motorcycle brotherhood" (and that many "cagers" are just psychopaths who are out to kill M/C riders), is so much BS we like to tell ourselves... we've all seen plenty of clowns on bikes doing all manner of stupid and reckless jack ass things out on the road, enough to know better than to consider any and everyone on a motorcycle "our brothers". By their own actions, plenty of motorcycle riders wind up with Darwin Awards, and in body bags at the morgue every year. IMO this tendency among motorcycle riders to always lay blame with the drivers of cars & trucks smacks of denial, that there couldn't possibly be bad M/C riders out there on the roads.
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post #18 of 19 Old 07-20-2015, 06:18 PM Thread Starter
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Well as I said before it WAS a wide boulevard-type road with ample room on either side and no other traffic.
It had occurred to me that his best course of action would have been to simply avoid my vehicle by riding around it on either side and continuing on his way at speed.
Of course that in no way absolves me from cutting him off in the first place and if he preferred to make a show of it and chew me out a little I'll take that over the alternative any day. : )
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post #19 of 19 Old 07-20-2015, 08:01 PM
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This is one of my favorite defensive riding videos.

https://youtu.be/eqQBubilSXU
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