Riding this bike is harder than I thought! - Page 2 - Honda CBR250R Forum : Honda CBR 250 Forums
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post #11 of 108 Old 07-22-2012, 11:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by av911 View Post

Any other tips you guys have besides more practice??
Buy a scooter.
I currently have three scooters and two motorcycles and owned lots of scooters and motorcycles in the past. Sometimes I ask myself why I even bother with the motorcycles any more. Scooters are easier to ride, more comfortable ( not always) have lots of storage and are very relaxing. These days you can buy a powerful scooter that will perform in the real world as well as most motorcycles.

I actually still enjoy motorcycles but I could never be comfortable on a new CBR250 and a bike you are not comfortable on is hard to ride. The seating and ergoes are for young kids who don't mind bending over at the hip in order look the part of a sport racer.

Seriously, the CBR is designed to mimic the look of a sport bike in order to attract young first time buyers. I get it. It looks cool but this is not the bike you want if you are looking for a comfortable easy to ride small commuter. I could see first time riders being turned off by how uncomfortable the CBR is.

The upcoming Honda street/trail 250 using the CBR's engine looks like it would make a better commuter although the seat height is uncharacteristically high for Honda.

Just keep practicing. You'll get better. I find that, for me, It is much easier and more relaxing to ride a more upright bike. The ninja 650r is a nice upright bike and I find it easier to ride than even my 07 ninja 250 which is more upright than the CBR.
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post #12 of 108 Old 07-22-2012, 11:36 AM
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While an automatic scooter is easier to ride, the two problems of the OP are easily overcome with a little practice. Killing the engine on startup just needs a few more revs. The wobbly takeoff is from not looking far enough down the road.

Step one: set 3000 rpm and listen to the sound it makes.
Step two: look at least two blocks down the road.
Step three: ease the clutch out while maintaing that engine sound by adding throttle.
Repeat until smooth.
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post #13 of 108 Old 07-22-2012, 12:02 PM
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Originally Posted by rrages View Post
I just took the MSF a month ago and am considering going through it again now that I'm slightly more experienced. Alot of what was said to me would make more sense now. Can't get too much good advise. Wonder if they'll let me ride my bike.
There is an advanced course and I think they want you to bring your own bike for it. Id think about taking that over the basic course.
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post #14 of 108 Old 07-22-2012, 12:30 PM
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Even better than just taking MSF BRC again (or going to ARC, which is *NOT* a good idea for someone who doesn't have a good handle on the basics) is to book parking lot practice with MSF. Many locations do this for folks who already passed BRC... you get to go out and spend more range time with an instructor.

As for your wrist getting sore... RELAX YOUR GRIP

Throttle is rule #1. If you cannot control the throttle, none of the rest matters.

Practice practice practice. Relax your grip. You are not to EVER be "holding on" with your hands. This makes your "wobble" worse.

Here's my vids about relaxing the grip.

cheers,
dj
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Motoring on two wheels since 1983

"This old engine has a nickels-and-dimes sound to it. As if there were a lot of loose change flying around inside. Sounds awful, but it's just normal valve clatter. Once you get used to that sound and learn to expect it, you automatically hear any difference. If you don't hear any, that's good." -- Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
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post #15 of 108 Old 07-22-2012, 12:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by av911 View Post
CBR250R ABS, Red

My riding experience: MSF course 2 years ago.

Physicality: 5'5", 28"-29" inseam, 135-140 lbs. Tip-toeing on both feet.

Bought this bike today brand new, 0 miles for $5400 OTD. The plan was to slowly start riding in the neighborhood, but it was too intimidating, as I was having trouble starting from a stop (it's been 2 years). Moved the bike back to the side of the house to get some practice.

There was just enough room to go 4mph, but my focus point was trying to get a smooth lift off. I tend to wobble left and right when I get my feet off the ground. I know speed (not enough throttle?) and my body position is a big factor, as my wrist is hurting right now. Also trying to get the clutch and throttle control working in sync.

This was in 100 degree weather, mind you, so I probably got in only 1.5 hours of practice.

Any other tips you guys have besides more practice? Going to a parking lot, instead of practicing by the side of the house?
I am just about the same height as you, and was only able tip toe the bike at first. Buy really good motorcycle riding boots. It really helped me feel secure on the ground (With only toes) until I broke the bike in more (I can now almost flat foot it with just slightly leaning it to one side)

Once you have good boots practice getting used to the weight of the bike by leaning it back and forth between your legs while standing. This will help you get used to the weight of the bike, and train your legs for the added weight. (This is from the MSF course)

You wont feel as wobbly if you condition your body to recognize the bikes weight and feel.

NOW I would move on to finding the 'friction zone' of the clutch. You do not need throttle for this. Plant yourself as heavily on the bike with your feet down. SLOWLY release the clutch until it starts to grab and move forward, but pull the clutch back in before it goes anywhere. Then push yourself backwards with your toes, and repeat. The goal is to stay in the same spot and rock back and forth. Do that a bunch of times before adding the throttle into the equation.

Now you can start to let the bike move forward. Start with the friction zone but let the clutch catch, and literally WALK the bike forward (No throttle needed) Do not pick up your feet until or unless you feel comfortable.

Now if you start going to fast DO NOT GRAB THE FRONT BRAKE!! DONT panic, just slowly apply pressure to the front brake to stop. If you grab it hard, it will throw you off balance and you may fall.

You and the bike just have to get to know eachother, it will come with time and practice. I am also really new to riding, and had taken the MSF course a week before getting my license and bike, so a lot of this 'newbie' stuff is still fresh in my mind. I hope this helps!! =)

And if all else fails, take the MSF course again!


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post #16 of 108 Old 07-22-2012, 01:08 PM
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Originally Posted by TX_Dj View Post
As for your wrist getting sore... RELAX YOUR GRIP
You and your darn grip Dj; I swear you say that in almost every post lol. I have been thinking about that a lot as I ride around though. I am quite amazed at how much it does help.


Another reason your wrists may be sore is that you're putting too much weight on the handlebars. You don't need to put any of your weight onto them to control the bike. I would bet if you sat a little straighter up (putting more of your weight over the seat and pegs) and "relax your grip," you'll be good to go in that department.
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post #17 of 108 Old 07-22-2012, 01:35 PM
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^Don't even need to put weight on the pegs really. Support the body with core muscles and squeeze the tank with knees and thighs. This helps with "becoming one with the bike". One just has to watch experienced riders stay on an upright bike without touching the bars. Relaxing the arms is HUGE.....relaxed arms do not transfer negative energy to the grips and thus steering.

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post #18 of 108 Old 07-22-2012, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Goyble View Post
I actually still enjoy motorcycles but I could never be comfortable on a new CBR250 and a bike you are not comfortable on is hard to ride. The seating and ergoes are for young kids who don't mind bending over at the hip in order look the part of a sport racer.

Seriously, the CBR is designed to mimic the look of a sport bike in order to attract young first time buyers. I get it. It looks cool but this is not the bike you want if you are looking for a comfortable easy to ride small commuter. I could see first time riders being turned off by how uncomfortable the CBR is.
I must be aging in reverse -- no complaints, though! I traded a comfortable and relatively powerful Honda FSC600 Silver Wing for my CBR250R. However, I'll admit your post is generally correct; the average age of Silver Wing riders is quite a bit higher than CBR250R riders. You are exactly right there are scooters out there that would surprise more than a few motorcycle riders with their performance.

2012 Honda CBR250R (7/2012 to 10/2013)
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post #19 of 108 Old 07-22-2012, 02:37 PM
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Originally Posted by live_to_ride View Post
^Don't even need to put weight on the pegs really. Support the body with core muscles and squeeze the tank with knees and thighs. This helps with "becoming one with the bike". One just has to watch experienced riders stay on an upright bike without touching the bars. Relaxing the arms is HUGE.....relaxed arms do not transfer negative energy to the grips and thus steering.

I know, but it's a good visual.
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post #20 of 108 Old 07-22-2012, 02:37 PM
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If you can, retake the safety course. If not, try to connect with someone with a lot (multiple years) of in traffic riding. I'd stop practicing on your own, if you don't find yourself improving, learning comes by repetition, and works both for good and for evil, if you will. If you keep practicing bad maneuvers, they will harden themselves into bad habits. Habits are harder to break, just ask someone that quit smoking, or drinking alcohol.
Just my bit of advice, I've been riding 50+ years and still remember having to unlearn things I'd learned before and found a "better" way.


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