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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
CBR250R owners who are thinking about upgrading to the "next step up" in the CBR family, what if I were to tell you that the best-selling and celebrated CBR600F family of 'practical Super-Sports' had been updated for a new generation? That you might have the choice not to surrender the pleasant rider triangle ergonomics and city street-friendly torque of the 250R in your move up the displacement table? That you might not need to pay those extra thousands of dollars for the "Super Sport premium" of racetrack performance? That's the promise of the 2011-2012 CBR600F, which carries forward the road-minded and rider-friendly tradition of the CBR600F4i which was discontinued in 2003.

A picture or two:





Here's the bike's design statement on Honda's slick 2012 new/concept model motorcycle press website.

Design and riding impressions from senior Motorcycle News writer Kevin Ash

What's the catch? Well, this bike was designed and is manufactured by Honda Italy and is presently a Europe and UK-only model, which might account for the fact that press on it here in the States is effectively nonexistent. I myself have long been considering a used F4i as the standard by which I'd measure any sport bike I upgraded to after the 250R, and so my surprise was total when I stumbled upon the news that the 600F series has been back in production as of this model year. Will the CBR600F ever see this side of the pond? My fingers are crossed but apparently the outlook coming from Honda America isn't positive. I suppose they'd rather import tons of knock-off cruisers and over-engineered VFRs to feed the stereotypical American craving for raw displacement over all other factors.

So for this thread: Thoughts on the 2011-2012 CBR600F? Any motions to start a petition/million man ride to the door of Honda America HQ? Anyone from the Old World on this forum who has ridden the thing and can comment?
 

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Man that is one sharp looking helmet in the pic. Love the concept and price but make mine a VTWIN and I'll be a owner.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Man that is one sharp looking helmet in the pic. Love the concept and price but make mine a V-TWIN and I'll be a owner.
While I agree that the market might benefit from better options for middle-displacement, faired V-twin motorcycles, the Kawasaki 650 already exists as a parallel twin that should have the powerband characteristics it sounds like you are after (although obviously lacking that v-twinny exhaust note). Then of course there's the Suzuki SV650 that sendler mentions, but which is now discontinued I think? This is missing the point though.

The CBR600F is simply not about that. It's continuing the tradition of the Hurricane and F2/F3/F4i, each of which was for all intents and purposes a Super Sport machine! Just not like we understand the RRs of today.

They used to win trophies with these bikes in the early nineties, back before the explosion of technology that caused the "Racer Replica" fad to go high and right. That's what this is, it's essentially a legitimate super sport but without delusions of grandeur. Maybe our market just isn't ready for that and the divide between the racer replica track-day hooligans and the everyday middle-displacement sport drivers has grown too big, but based on the screaming-hot market for used CBR600 F4i's and all of their attendant aftermarket parts, I'd say a demand does exist.

Come on, I can't be the only one who is interested in the 600F family for exactly what they are, not just moaning about another middle-displacement faired "sport-alike" that could have been!


Add the grab bars I use for my rack and take away the peaky, gas guzzling super sport cams.
It may not have the big 'wing' grab bars of our 250s but there is an OEM Honda accessory that is secured with buckles around the more camouflaged grab bars that exist in the CBR600F's tail section fairing (they are there just harder to see). Any other dedicated touring gear is going to be aftermarket however. Again we're dealing with the exact nuances of what the bike's intentions are. This isn't a Sport-Tourer, it's not exactly a mere faired Standard, and it's not a beginner's bike (media branding aside), this thing is only a step or two back from the racer replicas while still dwelling in the Sport/Super Sport category (depending on how you define such things).

As for fuel economy any form of inline-4 isn't likely to be your best bet. Approximately 43-45 mpg for a total of ~170 miles on a full tank seems to be about the average that the UK rider reviewers are agreeing on. Performance has it's price.
 

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Hmmmm. Keep the chassis, replace the inline-4 with the parallel twin from the new NC700S/X, shed about 40-50lbs, and that would be a bike I would consider purchasing. Relatively lightweight, good handling, torquey, and outstanding fuel economy. A decent spiritual successor to the CBR250R.

I love the white multi-coloured version though - wow. I'm wondering how much it would cost to have some shop replicate this colour scheme on my CBR250R. Anyone savvy enough with Photoshop to add those colours to our CBR250R to see what it would look like? :)

Mike
 

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The Kawasaki 650 is heavy, there is a reason they can sell it for 7,500, not enough light parts. The Suzuki SV650 was almost perfect except the 2nd gen they went with too agressive ergos in the S model. Its sounds awesome in stock form, when a SV650 drives by I take a 2nd look.

My last 2 bikes before the 250r were inline 4 cylinders. I dont think they are the most exciting engines out there. 2 cylinder and singles are more fun to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
What is the real out the door selling price? How much for a CBR600RR?
If we go by today's current exchange rate, the 2011 600F's MSRP in British pounds (£7,055) averages around 10,900 USD. In the 2011 model year the CBR600RR went for an MSRP of 11,199 in the US market (it is going to be $11,540 in the 2012 colors).

On paper that's not exactly a gorgeous comparison, but considering that it has only seen one year's production (out of Honda Italy, which apparently drives up the Euro price) I think it's not out of line to be optimistic. I'm no market expert but the bike has gotten excellent reviews (not sure about actual sales numbers) in most of the countries that it has been sold which might mean they'll consider expanding production. Maybe even to other factories with less overhead then Italy.

Secondly the last model year that the F4i was sold new in the US (back in 2006), it sat at an MSRP of $8499, and was moving out of dealerships for as low as $7,500 at the end of it's life. I think that's a reflection of the difference in enthusiasm that the US market has for these types of bikes, in comparison to the Race Replicas of the 600 cc world. Hopefully if the new CBR600F comes here it will be priced to reflect market conditions.
 

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How about this one available in Canada?
Honda Motorcycle
Discounted price is $8,599 Can.
 

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I would love a remake of the 71 CB 350. Above that and my Vulcan 500 is just fine for the $2k it cost me with 4100 miles. It would be better with FI.

regards
Badger
 

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Boggles my mind why the Ninja 400 can be bought in Canada and not in the US? Does Kawasaki have something against making riders happy and making money?
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Can that Honda really weigh 222kg/ 489lbs? The Ninja 400/ 650 is heavy at 460lbs.
Raw weight is just a number. For practical purposes, it's all in how you carry it. The smoothness, neutral steering inside of the turn, and low center of gravity of the 600F gets praise in it's euro biking reviews.

Honda CBR600F ABS (2011-current) - Honda Motorcycle Reviews

Boggles my mind why the Ninja 400 can be bought in Canada and not in the US? Does Kawasaki have something against making riders happy and making money?
From our lowly perspective as semi-sensible sportbike owners who are willing to take a slow walk up the displacement charts, this would indeed seem like a no-brainer (although judging from almost everyone else's reactions to the 600F I'm the freak around here for entertaining the notion of going up to a torquey 4-cylinder 600! I guess nobody else has nostalgia for the street-smart supersports of old...).

However the US market taken as a whole is notoriously unfriendly to small-displacement machines (the Ninja 250 being a famous exception) and so even with the global recession and a seeming trend towards more middleweight multipurpose sporting bikes in the rest of the world, it's going to be slow for the manufacturers to overcome their worries about costly marketing mistakes. Besides, it's not like there should be any surprise that the big motorcycle companies hate giving the US anything nice, new and shiny.
 

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Can that Honda really weigh 222kg/ 489lbs? The Ninja 400/ 650 is heavy at 460lbs.
I believe the Ninja 400R uses the Ninja 650R chassis so in essense you are getting an overweight Ninja 400R instead of a svelt 250R on steroids if Kawasaki placed the 400R's engine in their 250R chassis. No thanks.

I just read one review of the Ninja 400R. Interesting that he harped on how small the bike was - strange considering that it uses the 650R chassis (see link below). :eek:

His conclusion was also interesting. Apparently, nothing short of a ZX-14R is worthy of a long highway commute. From his impression I am left to assume that the 400R can't do highway speeds and is uncomfortable despite the upright seating position :rolleyes:. Such scholarly reviews as these only hinder the 400R's cause. These perceptions probably contribute to why smaller displacement bikes don't sell in N. America....

Mike

2011 Kawasaki Ninja 400R Review | Beginner Motorcycle Reviews | BeginnerMotorcycleReviews.com

Our 2011 Kawasaki Ninja 400R Review’s Epic Conclusion

Do you want a motorcycle but are afraid to hop on a 600cc+ machine? Does the concept of riding a 125cc or 250cc sound outright boring? If you answered yes to either of those questions you may find exactly what you are looking for in the Ninja 400R.
It’s fun. It’s quick. It’s confident. And it’s just a blast to throw around.
If you aren’t planning on racing on the weekends or having looooong highway commutes, the 400R could be a great fit!
 
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