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My bike is dripping a black, sticky substance. It's dripping small spots near the stand. The front sprocket may be leaking it as well. A good amount is near the transmission and some tubes. I've done searches online and I think it could only be excess chain lube. I hope it's nothing serious.
 

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My bike is dripping a black, sticky substance. It's dripping small spots near the stand. The front sprocket may be leaking it as well. A good amount is near the transmission and some tubes. I've done searches online and I think it could only be excess chain lube. I hope it's nothing serious.
You're probably right. Unless the seal on the gearbox output shaft is leaking. If your engine oil level is not going down, don't worry about it, it'll probably be excess lube from the chain.
 

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I use a chain wax that doesnt fling off and make a mess, the chain is internally lubricated and sealed with o rings you really only half to worry about the outside of the chain. Needs to be cleaned and sprayed to protect against rust.
 

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I found the same stuff on the ledge of the fairing under the shifter. No odor, and black filthy dirty gummy tar. Cleaned it off, put a paper towel over the area and found no more. I am convinced it is chain lube from months ago. To sticky and thick for engine/transmission oil.
 

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I use a chain wax that doesnt fling off and make a mess, the chain is internally lubricated and sealed with o rings you really only half to worry about the outside of the chain. Needs to be cleaned and sprayed to protect against rust.
What about the contact surfaces between rollers and sprockets, and sprocket teeth and side plates? New here to chain drive, and I am trying to figure out a good compromise between lubing and keeping things from beign too goopy.
 

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Go with the chain wax or DuPont's Teflon chain lube (it used to be sold at Lowe's stores for about $4/can).
 

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I have been using Dupont lube for years...even on dirt bikes, and am very satisfied with it. Keeping the chain clean is the key to long service. I use one of these Amazon.com: Finish Line Grunge Brush Chain: Gear and Chain Cleaning Tool: Sports & Outdoors
The front sprocket wears at least twice as fast as the rear. Keep an eye on that one. A worn sprocket will accelerate chain wear.
The same day I got my brush in mail I went to walmart to buy the dupont degreaser n chain wax and found the grunge brush sitting on the shelf next to it for a couple dollars less than what I paid for it from amazon,shipping and all :(
 

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I buy a lot of stuff from Amazon. Quite often, they have it on sale, after I order it, for less than I paid. Still a great place to shop.
I really like those Grunge brushes. You can get the side plates (closest to the wheel) really clean, and it also removes the crud that builds up on the sides of the sprocket.
 

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Gotta laugh that a lubed chain is a 'CBR250 problems and issues.'
 

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A cheap option is to use EP90 gear oil, and apply it with a brush. It can be a bit messy if you run at high speeds a lot, but it does sort of self clean your chain, as it flies off. :D
That is what all chain companies used to recommend. It is a great lubricant, inexpensive, and the "fling" is much easier to clean off than chainlube.
 

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Actually, I use ATF (automatic transmission fluid) on my bikes and the DuPont on my wife's bike.

ATF is messy. The dirt bike chain is washed and relubed after every outing. The street bike is lubed every 300-350 miles. I have boxes (flats, a bottom and a couple of inches of sides) with old newspaper to soak up the drainage/drippage from the chain and drive sprocket casing.

I'm trying this on the street bike because I had very little chain adjustment (one notch on the snails) after 8800 miles using ATF on the CRF230L. The drive sprocket was worn so I added 9-tooth larger rear sprocket and used the excess from a new 120-link chain to make a spare chain using two masterlinks and the old chain.

I've only got 2300-2400 miles on the NX250 with it's new chain and sprockets, but the ATF seems to be working well. I'll be touring on it in June and I'll take the DuPont spray with me for that trip.

Remember Honda used to fill the forks with ATF because it was better for the seals than oil; I'm not sure if they still do that or not. ATF has additives to help keep flexible parts flexible, so it should work with o-rings too. Anyway that's my logic and I expect the new NX250 chain to last around 24,000 miles.
 

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I have used Marvels Oil on chains. It is very similar to ATF. I soaked a piece of towel with it then wrung it out. When you apply it to the chain, it just leaves an oily film so you don't get that initial fling off. I kept the towel in a zip lock bag when traveling.
I went to Dupont because it was easier and stayed put longer. Some guys claim amazing chain life just using WD40.
 

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Helping newbies need not be ironic. We all had to start learning from ground zero.
 

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Yes , least its better than the rusty bike rusty chain thread lol.
 
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