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@Johnfielding2018

Now, assuming you tested all fuses and they conduct electricity. And your safety-switches are in order, that takes care of ground side of starting circuit. Let's look at positive trigger side of starting circuit:

1. measure voltage at +positive battery terminal. Voltage = ???

2. from battery +positive terminal, trace thick black cable to B terminal of starter-solenoid. Measured voltage there = ???

3. at starter-solenoid connector, measure voltage at R/W wire terminal (slide rubber boot off starter-solenoid connector and back-probe terminal). Voltage = ???

4. measure voltage at R/W wire going into ignition switch. Voltage = ???

5. key ON, measure voltage at Black/R wire leaving ignition switch. Voltage = ???

6. key ON, measure voltage at Black/G wire going into engine-stop switch on handlebar. Voltage = ???

7. key ON, stop-switch ON, measure voltage at Black/Blue wire leaving engine-stop switch on handlebar. Voltage=???

8. key ON, stop-switch ON, measure voltage at Black/Blue wire going into start-button. Voltage = ???

9. key ON, stop-switch ON, measure voltage at Yellow/Red wire leaving start-button. Push Start-button. Voltage = ???

10. key ON, stop-switch ON, measure voltage at Yellow/Red wire going into starter-soleniod. Push Start-button. Voltage = ???

11. key ON, stop-switch ON, measure voltage at M terminal of starter-soleniod. Push Start-button. Voltage = ???

12. key ON, stop-swtich ON, measure voltage at +positive terminal of starter-motor. Push Start-button. Voltage = ???


Basically trace path of electricity from battery to starter-motor. Where +power stops shows you've got problem between that spot and previous test-point. Most likely disconnected wire, or wire broken in process of transferring harness between frames.

Multimeter gives you definite 100% verification in black/white, all-or-nothing terms. No guessing needed. Unless you're Superman and can see electrons flowing in wires, you must use a multimeter to troubleshoot this. Saves you tonnes of time and turns endless weeks of frustrating guessing into 5-minute simple repair!!! It actually took me longer to write this up than it would take you to find and fix problem with multimeter!!! Imagine how much fun it'll be to ride that bike! :) 👋
 
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