Honda CBR 250 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got my bike today, first bike ever, first time riding. Practiced all day, got pretty good. But every once in a while, I have a problem starting from a stop. I would be in what seems to be 1st gear, and try to feather the clutch and the gas, and at about 4k rpm's I stall and I get nowhere. An experienced rider told me it's a safety thing, but I don't understand what for. And I get worried at stoplights that it will get stuck and I'll look like an idiot. Any ideas? Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,284 Posts
Go to a parking lot and practice getting the feel of the friction point. Gradually release clutch, open throttle and let foot off back brake. The time to learn this is not in traffic and at lights. When you get the feel of the friction point this will give you the confidence when at lights and stop and go situations. Practice, practice, practice
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,089 Posts
I got my bike today, first bike ever, first time riding. Practiced all day, got pretty good. But every once in a while, I have a problem starting from a stop. I would be in what seems to be 1st gear, and try to feather the clutch and the gas, and at about 4k rpm's I stall and I get nowhere. An experienced rider told me it's a safety thing, but I don't understand what for. And I get worried at stoplights that it will get stuck and I'll look like an idiot. Any ideas? Thanks
Let's just say there is no way you got "pretty good" after 10 minutes of practicing. My dad has been riding for 30 years and says he is still learning how to ride. Never get complacent when riding because the bike will always remind you who's boss.

Practice makes perfect! Practice to the point where it becomes a natural reflex. I am a new CBR rider and I bought my bike 2 weeks ago. I just rolled over to 400 miles and I bought the bike with 4.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,377 Posts
You are an idiot if you think you got pretty good and can go out in traffic after a day.

Asking for help on an internet forum is not going to help much either. Riding is all about learning by doing.

Get help from experienced riders. Go to motorcycle riding kindergarten. Practice your basic skills until you have them fairly well sorted before you venture out into traffic.... where you have to deal with a lot more than how to handle the clutch.

A bit of a blunt response to your first post, I know. To redeem yourself, a bit of a self introduction might be a good idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,089 Posts
I got my bike today, first bike ever, first time riding. Practiced all day, got pretty good. But every once in a while, I have a problem starting from a stop. I would be in what seems to be 1st gear, and try to feather the clutch and the gas, and at about 4k rpm's I stall and I get nowhere. An experienced rider told me it's a safety thing, but I don't understand what for. And I get worried at stoplights that it will get stuck and I'll look like an idiot. Any ideas? Thanks
I worry about people like you that worry about how to get the vehicle moving. That is riding 101. You are in the same boat many of us were in at one point. Self teaching is fantastic but you should attend a MSF course asap. Do you have a license?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
First off, you're not anywhere that everyone on here hasn't been their first days on a bike...

I second the recommendation of a local MSF course. It should be mandatory for all riders... They focus on friction points (the basis of getting moving) and lots more you'll find incredibly applicable (counter-steering, quick stops, low speed tight maneuvers, etc.).

Self-teaching is fine... assuming you already know the courseware...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,377 Posts
These MSF courses that ya'll harp on about are all fine and dandy, but does it occur to you that the OP may not even know MSF stands for. I didn't when I first joined this forum, and I had a good few years of riding behind me by then.

There are motorcycle riding schools in many countries now, and they are a good idea for a beginner if there is one handy. They are one place where you can find experienced riders to teach you things.

Where I live now motorcycle riding schools are few, if any. Motorcycles outnumber cars on the road three to one. Kids just learn to ride as part of growing up. They ride around the village first. Once they get on to the road they have several years experience.

I am self taught too, like most farm kids where I come from. My father told me where the controls were, and left me to it. By the time I got my licence to ride on the road, I had already had four years of off road experience.

School of Hard Knocks, or Riding School, take your choice, but if you don't want to be seen as a fool (or worse), get those basic skills sorted before venturing into traffic..... where you'll have to learn a whole set of road-craft skills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
I got my bike today, first bike ever, first time riding. Practiced all day, got pretty good. But every once in a while, I have a problem starting from a stop. I would be in what seems to be 1st gear, and try to feather the clutch and the gas, and at about 4k rpm's I stall and I get nowhere. An experienced rider told me it's a safety thing, but I don't understand what for. And I get worried at stoplights that it will get stuck and I'll look like an idiot. Any ideas? Thanks
Make sure you are in first gear when you take off. It sounds like you might be trying to start of in 2nd.... sometimes the bike may not slip down in to first when you are stopped so roll the bike back or forward a touch while holding the gear shifter in the down position until you feel it click into first. If you are not able to do the roll technique, then you can also hold the gear shifter down and slowly let the clutch out until it clicks down and then pull the clutch back in until you are ready to go. This does not indicate a problem with the bike, just some things to learn on your part maybe if this is indeed the case.

Oh and definitely take the Motorcycle Safety Foundation course. It is a huge plus in your arsenal of riding knowledge and will get you some hands-on experience in a safe and controlled environment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
These MSF courses that ya'll harp on about are all fine and dandy, but does it occur to you that the OP may not even know MSF stands for. I didn't when I first joined this forum, and I had a good few years of riding behind me by then.
You're right -- should have spelled out the acronym...

...but, then again, that's why Al Gore invented Google...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,097 Posts
I got my bike today, first bike ever, first time riding. Practiced all day, got pretty good. But every once in a while, I have a problem starting from a stop. I would be in what seems to be 1st gear, and try to feather the clutch and the gas, and at about 4k rpm's I stall and I get nowhere. An experienced rider told me it's a safety thing, but I don't understand what for. And I get worried at stoplights that it will get stuck and I'll look like an idiot. Any ideas? Thanks
As noted - please take a Motorcycle Safety Foundation (MSF) course if at all possible! You need a good solid foundation of the basic skills in order to be able to ride safely.

As far as the issue you are having, it was mentioned I believe, but be certain the the transmission is in first gear. A cycle transmission will not shift if it's not spinning. At times you will need to ease the clutch out slightly, then back in, in order to downshift when stopped. Don't pull the clutch in when you are in 4th gear (or whatever) and coast to a stop expecting to downshift when stopped - do you downshifting smoothly 1 gear at a time as you are slowing. That way if the light turns green as you roll up you don't find yourself in 4th gear at 15 MPH.

Make sure you aren't treating the clutch like a toggle switch. You need to be able to get to the starting point of engagement fairly rapidly, then hold at that point until you have some forward movement before fully letting the lever out all the way. You may need to add a slight amount of throttle, but not much. Once you get a feel for it you can almost leave the line at idle without stalling, but usually you'll want some amount of throttle (not 4000 RPMs worth though) to get rolling quicker.

You need practice to learn these things, but the street is not a good place to do it.


Jay
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,089 Posts
You're right -- should have spelled out the acronym...

...but, then again, that's why Al Gore invented Google...
Count it! :D

I figured it was common knowledge as I knew what it stood for long before ever touching a bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,089 Posts
Also the MSF (MySuperFriend) course was a mild fail. Though they do teach you novice fundamentals, you will not exceed speeds in excess of 20mph. Then again, I would have felt rather unsafe with some of the students who failed the course, speeding over 20 LOL
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,284 Posts
The goal of the MSF course is to teach students proper bike control at 20mph which is what the OP appears to be struggling with at times....and is common with begginners. This forum has identified a first gear "issue" (which really isn't an issue) with the cbr250r and it is easily solved by releasing the clutch slightly or rolling the bike. However, rolling the bike at traffic lights is not the ideal situation to be in so releasing the clutch is the best choice and works everytime.

I still endorse parking lot practice to allow the OP a safer enviornment to get to know his bike. Become familiar with the friction point OP....Learn how to gear up and down/clutch control for stops and starts in a controlled manner. A motorcycle safety course is the way to go, as it will teach you proper gear shifting etc. It appears the US offers these courses ranging from $50-$200. In my neck of the woods we pay an average of $500!!!! as we don't have the balmy climate year round condusive to cheaper courses. Sadly this is a deterant for some to forego the lessons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
I have to give you Canadians kudos for dealing with a limited "riding season." You've got to be chomping by the time March rolls around. While it does get cold in Atlanta for a few weeks out of the year, and we've been known to have an ice storm or two, we basically have a year round riding season.

I agree about the 10-20mph maneuvering, being the point. We had a number of experienced riders in our class that felt *that*, as well as the concept of counter-steering, which unbelievably, many of them (experienced) hadn't heard of or embraced, essentially paid for the class.
Additionally, even at 20mph, we had one student leave in an ambulance (dislocated shoulder), and I managed to bend a brake caliper getting too frisky and experimental on those tight turns (better their bike, than mine -- and better in a controlled environment, than on the highway. Just can't do it during the test-out).

Now, a good bit later, a buddy (Ninja rider) and I will be taking one of their follow-on classes tomorrow (and I *still* plan on using their bike -- our option).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,284 Posts
^ ha ha. I'd use their bike as well. Not trashing mine while learning new maneuvers. Yup, I'm chomping at the bit. We've had some balmy weather where I cld have taken a short ride but my bike has been at the shop getting powder coating done. Awaiting installation of rearsets and levers. I know the guy who runs the Powerhouse so he fits my mods in inbetween full payinmg customers. He insists on a deal thus, I relent!!!:D Counting the days till first ride in several months which seems like a lifetime:(

Have fun on your next course. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,089 Posts
I have to give you Canadians kudos for dealing with a limited "riding season." You've got to be chomping by the time March rolls around. While it does get cold in Atlanta for a few weeks out of the year, and we've been known to have an ice storm or two, we basically have a year round riding season.

I agree about the 10-20mph maneuvering, being the point. We had a number of experienced riders in our class that felt *that*, as well as the concept of counter-steering, which unbelievably, many of them (experienced) hadn't heard of or embraced, essentially paid for the class.
Additionally, even at 20mph, we had one student leave in an ambulance (dislocated shoulder), and I managed to bend a brake caliper getting too frisky and experimental on those tight turns (better their bike, than mine -- and better in a controlled environment, than on the highway. Just can't do it during the test-out).

Now, a good bit later, a buddy (Ninja rider) and I will be taking one of their follow-on classes tomorrow (and I *still* plan on using their bike -- our option).
I will also take the advanced bike course. However, I plan to use my bike this time to get even more acquainted with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,377 Posts
Count it! :D

I figured it was common knowledge as I knew what it stood for long before ever touching a bike.
Yes, many of you Seppos figure a lot of things are common knowledge and the American way is the only way. There is a whole big world outside your backyard, and there are a whole lot of people on this forum who live out here.

We still don't know where the OP, nicholasdurham, comes from.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
878 Posts
I like the government approved private riding schools we have here, two evenings in a classroom, two days in a parking lot, if you pass the skills test then it's two days on the road, there's a written test then a road test where the government inspector follows you in a car and gives you directions by radio, if you pass you get your license. Altogether $700-800 using their (the schools) bike.

Teaching yourself in traffic is dangerous and no way to learn to ride a bike. There's a huge correlation between having proper instruction and a long riding life!!

To address the original posters question, I don't think there's anything wrong with your bike, you're not always in first which can happen easily on any motorcycle, practice in a safe area and it will all become something you'll accomplish without really thinking about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,089 Posts
Yes, many of you Seppos figure a lot of things are common knowledge and the American way is the only way. There is a whole big world outside your backyard, and there are a whole lot of people on this forum who live out here.

We still don't know where the OP, nicholasdurham, comes from.
No need to stereotype nor use derogatory slang terms to describe people you disagree with. I've been based numerous locations throughout the world during my enlistment in the military and have probably seen more than you have.

Stating that something is common knowledge has NOTHING to do with race or location.

I like how you assume the OP lives near you when that doesn't appear to be the situation.

Don't be a douche bag. I enjoy communicating with everyone on the forum and have gained much needed knowledge. Don't be that "guy".
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top