Honda CBR 250 Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

I was riding my bike normally the other day when I noticed there a loud sound coming from the engine, at first I thought it was the surrounding cars but then pulled over and found out it was coming from the engine. It used to sound really healthy and quiet and now it was sounding quite loud and also there was a ticking or clicking sound in the background. I wasn't far from home so rode 6km back to my garage, the loud sound was still there. Turned it off and on again and the sound was still there.

I didn't ride it anymore but when I was going to take it to the mechanic some days after that, tried to turn on the bike and the engine wouldn't fire up at all (battery is good). So I had to call tow to take it to the mechanic. After a few days the mechanic told me that the Cam Chain Tensioner broke and it jumped some teeth in the engine. To repair it he gave me two options:
1) Open the engine and try to see if it can be fixed (if and how many valves were broken), which if possible could cost around $1k but he wasn't sure.
2) Buy a new engine for $1.2k + and fit it...possibly looking at $2k total

The third option is of course sell it as it is. I've bought this bike for $3.2k with 11 months registration and in June I changed chain and sprockets with minor servicing for around $750. So I've put in this bike around $4k and I'm looking at some significant financial loss for my first bike (dumb me I thought Japanese bikes wouldn't break completely at 18000 Kms).

I'm not sure which path to take, of course I want to keep riding the bike but limit my financial loss. Any advice would be appreciated.

PS. Amounts are in Australian dollars.






Quote Reply & Quote

Edit
 

·
Registered
Honda: INNOVA125i(2010); CBR250R(2013)
Joined
·
188 Posts
sounding quite loud and also there was a ticking or clicking sound in the background. I wasn't far from home so rode 6km back to my garage
Hello & Thank you for the detailed sharing,
Unfortunately I am not a good news person for you.
If your engine is currently suffering from severe damage, then unfortunately there are no magic solutions that will bring it back to life on a cheap budget.
Next time when you hear such noises do not ride even 6 km,
you must stop on the side Instantly and order a tow.

cost around $1k but he wasn't sure.
YES. An accurate damage assessment requires a great deal of work, so I guess for that reason the mechanic only gave you a general estimate (to not charge you for an expensive inspection). For depth examination, an examination must be conducted in two areas:
1. Valve assembly: Disassemble covers; Lift the fuel tank; Move the radiator; Remove the valve cover.
2. Right engine cover: Disassemble a clutch cable; Remove liquids (Oil, and Coolant); Disassemble cooling pipes; Remove right engine cover.
3. If after the depth examination you choose not to repair it, you will add to the inspection costs all the work (and parts: gaskets, etc.) that need to be done for put everything back in place.

I'm not sure which path to take, of course I want to keep riding the bike but limit my financial loss.
Economically the loss is inevitable, the question is how to manage the crisis in the best way for you. It's hard to know which is more correct, replacing an engine or repairing an existing engine. You can try to get the mechanic's approval for a global job that does not exceed 1.2k Australian dollars, and mechanic's will taking the decide whether "new" or "repair". In addition get from him a full warranty on the engine (let’s say for 2 years). If you are on a limit budget then perhaps it is best to sell, save money, and then when you are already smarter and out of the economic crisis, go back and buy again.

Only you know what's good for you.
We all, at any stage in life, will experience crises, take a deep breath and move on, time heals everything, you just need patience. In the end everything goes well.
Meanwhile maintain a good mood!
AND Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Hi

I was riding my bike normally the other day when I noticed there a loud sound coming from the engine, at first I thought it was the surrounding cars but then pulled over and found out it was coming from the engine. It used to sound really healthy and quiet and now it was sounding quite loud and also there was a ticking or clicking sound in the background. I wasn't far from home so rode 6km back to my garage, the loud sound was still there. Turned it off and on again and the sound was still there.

I didn't ride it anymore but when I was going to take it to the mechanic some days after that, tried to turn on the bike and the engine wouldn't fire up at all (battery is good). So I had to call tow to take it to the mechanic. After a few days the mechanic told me that the Cam Chain Tensioner broke and it jumped some teeth in the engine. To repair it he gave me two options:
1) Open the engine and try to see if it can be fixed (if and how many valves were broken), which if possible could cost around $1k but he wasn't sure.
2) Buy a new engine for $1.2k + and fit it...possibly looking at $2k total

The third option is of course sell it as it is. I've bought this bike for $3.2k with 11 months registration and in June I changed chain and sprockets with minor servicing for around $750. So I've put in this bike around $4k and I'm looking at some significant financial loss for my first bike (dumb me I thought Japanese bikes wouldn't break completely at 18000 Kms).

I'm not sure which path to take, of course I want to keep riding the bike but limit my financial loss. Any advice would be appreciated.

PS. Amounts are in Australian dollars.
The first sad thing I've read for the day, good luck and more power to you, stay as strong as you can!
YES. An accurate damage assessment requires a great deal of work, so I guess for that reason the mechanic only gave you a general estimate (to not charge you for an expensive inspection). For depth examination, an examination must be conducted in two areas:
1. Valve assembly: Disassemble covers; Lift the fuel tank; Move the radiator; Remove the valve cover.
2. Right engine cover: Disassemble a clutch cable; Remove liquids (Oil, and Coolant); Disassemble cooling pipes; Remove right engine cover.
3. If after the depth examination you choose not to repair it, you will add to the inspection costs all the work (and parts: gaskets, etc.) that need to be done for put everything back in place.

Economically the loss is inevitable, the question is how to manage the crisis in the best way for you. It's hard to know which is more correct, replacing an engine or repairing an existing engine. You can try to get the mechanic's approval for a global job that does not exceed 1.2k Australian dollars, and mechanic's will taking the decide whether "new" or "repair". In addition get from him a full warranty on the engine (let’s say for 2 years). If you are on a limit budget then perhaps it is best to sell, save money, and then when you are already smarter and out of the economic crisis, go back and buy again.
Only you know what's good for you.
We all, at any stage in life, will experience crises, take a deep breath and move on, time heals everything, you just need patience. In the end everything goes well.
Meanwhile maintain a good mood!
AND Good luck!
That's the best suggestion, in this situation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,098 Posts
Are you able to do basic mechanical work yourself?

If so, I would start by removing the valve cover and checking the cam-timing to see if it has indeed jumped. Mechanics aren't always correct. Also pull the cam chain tensioner and take a look at it. See if the plunger travels freely.

Set the cam timing correctly and re-install the cam chain tensioner temporarily. Remove the cover (EDIT: round inspection cap) on the left side of the engine and fit a socket to the bolt on the end of the crank. Check for proper rotation direction (I'm not certain which way, but spin it the correct direction), and see if you can spin the engine over manually. While turning it over manually, watch the valves to see if they are moving freely up and down. If a valve is bent it's going to go down and stay down. The piston may push it back up if it's not bent too badly. A bent valve will most likely damage the top of the piston as well.

If things seem ok, I'd drain the oil and look for metal particles to help determine if there was damage to any of the gears. Check the filter as well.

If everything looks to be in good shape, I'd probably order a new cam chain tensioner before trying to start it. I don't think they are expensive. Some owners have gone to a manual tensioner, but that takes a bit of fiddling, and you need to keep an eye on the adjustment.

It may not be as bad as you think, but it will take some work to know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Are you able to do basic mechanical work yourself?

If so, I would start by removing the valve cover and checking the cam-timing to see if it has indeed jumped. Mechanics aren't always correct. Also pull the cam chain tensioner and take a look at it. See if the plunger travels freely.

Set the cam timing correctly and re-install the cam chain tensioner temporarily. Remove the cover on the left side of the engine and fit a socket to the bolt on the end of the crank. Check for proper rotation direction (I'm not certain which way, but spin it the correct direction), and see if you can spin the engine over manually. While turning it over manually, watch the valves to see if they are moving freely up and down. If a valve is bent it's going to go down and stay down. The piston may push it back up if it's not bent too badly. A bent valve will most likely damage the top of the piston as well.

If things seem ok, I'd drain the oil and look for metal particles to help determine if there was damage to any of the gears. Check the filter as well.

If everything looks to be in good shape, I'd probably order a new cam chain tensioner before trying to start it. I don't think they are expensive. Some owners have gone to a manual tensioner, but that takes a bit of fiddling, and you need to keep an eye on the adjustment.

It may not be as bad as you think, but it will take some work to know.
You've added much to my knowledge as well. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,098 Posts
This is what can happen when the cam timing goes bad -

Found this when I purchased a non-running CRF150R that the owner (kid) claimed - "hasn't run in a while".

Spun the cam (similar to jumping the timing chain) from massive over-revving. That changed the timing so a valve hit the piston and bent, which chewed up the cam and a bunch of other stuff -

Household hardware Auto part Nut Metal Fastener


Automotive tire Automotive engine gasket Gas Fluid Auto part


Wood Household hardware Gas Auto part Metal


Kitchen appliance Kitchen utensil Automotive lighting Fluid Cookware and bakeware


Engineering Household hardware Tool Auto part Cylinder


Hopefully yours isn't the same - but it's fixable. Bottom-end was fine. Needed parts and a valve job. Probably spent about $400 total on that.

Also eventually put a new crank in it, as my son is now racing it. It's been great, and he has won a bunch of races with it.

Crank was a bit more work -

Bicycle part Silver Font Nickel Auto part
 

·
Registered
Honda: INNOVA125i(2010); CBR250R(2013)
Joined
·
188 Posts
Are you able to do basic mechanical work yourself?
If I may comment
In our CBR removing the valve cover, when the engine is inside the chassis (and not outside the chassis), it is a "penalty", this is a task that for the amateur mechanic is a significant challenge.
Mechanics aren't always correct
As a way of life, I am not hurry to blame mechanics, and precisely in this case and in light of the background story, the mechanic's proposal seems fair, I would just add: Giving full warranty to the engine for two years. And it's fine to be in doubt and ask for a Second Opinion.
Remove the cover on the left side of the engine and fit a socket to the bolt on the end of the crank.
Great idea, just an optimization suggestion: It's enough to disassemble the CAP.

Automotive tire Automotive lighting Vehicle brake Motor vehicle Alloy wheel
Hand Automotive tire Wood Finger Tool


Automotive tire Gas Auto part Flooring Human leg
Automotive lighting Vehicle Fender Automotive tire Rim


I'd drain the oil and look for metal particles
Our CBR has a strainer filter that is located under the right engine cover, the strainer usually stops 99.9% of metal chips. The oil may come out clean when the strainer held a considerable amount of chips.
Material property Font Transparency Electronics accessory Magenta

It may not be as bad as you think, but it will take some work to know.
YES. Everything is relative. jkv357 As you mentioned in your beautiful and detailed response if there is damage to the valves the CYLINDER HEAD must also be removed. If there is damage to the lower gear located on the crankshaft axis (the gear of the timing chain), this can only be seen if the right engine cover is removed.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top