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Hello fellow CBR enthusiasts,
I'm basically a complete novice rider and have been doing a lot of thinking on purchasing my first ever new bike. Everything I read about the CBR250, from the expert reviews to your posts on this forum... makes me even want it more than ever.

However....

Until last weekend my idea on purchasing a motorcycle has been shattered due to what I had been exposed to.
I witnessed a crash that involved a cbr600 and an SUV (See pics below) and the rider had died on the scene from a fatal head-blow, since he wasn't wearing a helmet. The SUV was coming out of a 3-way junction and didn't watch out for the main road, where the motorcycle was at a high-speed and instantly rammed into it. They say it's 70% fault on the deceased rider and 30% on the SUV driver. Asides from all that, I literally got the chills seeing how the rider's life was taken away in a split of a second. I mean it could've happened to any other rider on the road. Of course someone might argue that had he worn his helmet, he would've survived the crash with some broken bones or what not...but that's not what concerns me now.
What concerns me is how fearful I am now and unsure to whether I take on this sport and be as careful as possible, or scratch the whole idea and please my entire family, who have been extremely against the idea...especially after this crash that made headlines across my town.

I'm basically reaching out for advice from the people who share my same passion toward this unique sport.

I'd truly appreciate anyone's input and help into solving my dilemma.

Much respect to everyone.
 

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You can only control how you operate your vehicle. While avoiding this is not a complete guarantee, choosing how to ride is completely your choice. Had someone heeded speed limits and practiced proper rider etiquette, this may have been avoided. When riding bikes you are required to possess the utmost level of awareness. Your eyes need not settle on one point but rather scanning the area consistently for threats.

I've spent some time in the AOR overseas and I am still very wary when commuting to work or riding around town.

I saw a fella split his noggin' on a guardrail before I bought my bike.

**** happens but don't let fear rule your life! We all make risky choices every day and riding a motorcycle definitely has it's risks but they can be maintained with proper rider education.

If you are seeking a guarantee for your safety, you are in the wrong sport. Not wearing a helmet on a bike is like driving a car with no doors, seat belts, no windshield, and on flat tires. If a situation arises, it's no bueno.

Take the motorcycle safety course or whatever is the equivalent in your area and then decide whether riding is for you.
 

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I felt (and still do to a degree) the same way as you for several years before deciding to go ahead with riding a motorcycle. First of all, I think having some fear is natural and healthy, and IMO that attitude will help keep you a little safer. Riding a bike will always be more dangerous than driving a car, but there are things you can do to minimize that risk, beginning with all the gear all the time. The bottom line is that you have to live your life, you never know what will happen tomorrow so why not enjoy each day (as safely as possible).

Good luck and safe riding.

p.s. take the MSF course if you haven't already. I just took it (and rode a motorcycle for the first time in the process) this past weekend and learned a ton.
 

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After seeing the accident. You should just think of it as reminder to be responsible & be aware of your surrondings when riding a motorcycle or a car or bicycle. . Dont let it stop from riding a motorcycle. Ive been in a few accidents & have seen a few. Just the other day 3 people tried to pull out in front of me. Motorcycles are harder to see, but over time you will learn what other people are going to do so you can watch out for potential danger.
 

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As VUD noted - first thing to do before hitting the streets is to get some training.

I've been riding on the street for over 30 years, and 5 on the dirt before that, and I absolutely will never ride without proper gear. I've hit a deer on the hwy, and have had numerous track-related crashes. I would expect to be killed if not wearing a helmet and parted-ways with my cycle at anything over walking speeds.

You can't compare fatalities of riders not wearing helmets with riders wearing helmets - the difference is night and day. Look at cycle fatality statistics - alcohol is a factor in many accidents - how !#$% stupid is that! Add that to no helmet and of course you'll be dead! Even if you're "careful" there's still no way you will survive any amount of head trauma, but that should be completely obvious.

Get the proper training and gear, ride smart, and your chances of surviving on the street are pretty good.


Jay
 

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I agree with what everyone has said. You should constantly be aware of everything and everyone around you. Obey your traffic signs, etc. Practice defensive driving no matter what vehicle you're in or riding.

I saw a guy wreck on a sports bike after hauling ass from a stop light, making a left turn around a corner. His bike was black, he took off way to fast in an area that was just not safe to, a Black Jeep Cherokee pulled out of a parking lot and he hit the car. The damage was much worse than the picture of the car you took above. He was wearing all his safe equipment and was hurt bad. I'm sure he survived cause he was rolling around in pain on the ground.

That just reminded me how not to drive and how to drive. Safely. Well aware. Warning and info signs are up for a reason.
 

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What concerns me is how fearful I am now
This is the first thing I notice. Riding with the wrong frame of mind will work against you. I've had to work through the same thing, having wrecked a bike literally before I knew how to ride it. In order to build your own confidence and get into the right frame of mind (headspace, if you will) I would advise these steps:

1. Get the gear. Some of it will be required for the motorcycle safety class anyway. Get reliable, comfortable gear that gives you the confidence to know you are protected.

2. Take the class. I was being taught by my brother (who, it turns out, is a terrible teacher). The MSF class opened my eyes and allowed me to progress quickly and safely. It gave me a great deal of confidence.

3. Get the bike. You'll never know what you're capable of until you try. Motorcycling is a culture and cultures change slowly and with time. Your family will never change their mind unless you show them - over years - that riding is safe.

That said, if this is an obstacle you can't get over, just be honest with yourself. You know how dangerous the roads can be.
 

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read "The Hurt Report"
do the opposite.
Think how it played in to the rider you saw. Life is a risk the best you can do is stack the deck in your favor.
 

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Don't get it until you are ready, then get it. People sometimes do die and get badly injured on motorcyclists - you knew that before you saw the crash, didn't you?


Sent from my Motorcycle iPhone app
 

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Like JKV357 said, I learned during our class that something like 31% of motorcycle fatalities have alcohol involved (on the deceased rider's part). You can make a decision not to be part of that statistic. Also, 70% of all fatalities are a result of head injuries and I imagine a large chunk of those people weren't wearing a helmet.
 

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Hi, first let me give condolences to the horrendous trauma you wittnessed. Seeing some one die is beyond tragic let alone a young person in what could have been preventable. I work as a critical care paramedic and have attended many, many crashes. Each one leaves an indelible hurt in my heart and a memory and face burned in my brain. The experience can leave us feeling very fallible. It is easy to say "bad stuff happens", however, one needs to allow time for the shock to dissipate.....in which it will!

I agree with some of the posters advice to take the MSF course and decide from there. You will have your confidence boosted with the theory portion; a safe enviornment to practice on a bike; the (hopefully) competent instructors that will teach good habits from the start. No one says you have to launch your riding career onto a freeway and ride like the speed of light. In time you will find out what kind of rider and riding you wish to do. Some ride everywhere and look at their bike strickly as a means of transportation. Others race at a track every weekend. Some riders are "fair weather riders", one cloud in the sky they stick close to home. The only way to figure this out is to take one step at a time.

Please don't be spooked away from a sport/hobby that has been a goal of yours for sometime because of a crash. There are very few "accidents".....professionally we call what you wittnesed an MVC...motor vehicle crash as usually the drivers/riders were not paying attention, as in the case of the crash you happened upon.

I sympathize with you and am impressed that the loss of this young man brought tears to your eyes. Please take the MSF course and give it a go. I am sure once you do, you will leave the course with a good idea if riding is a sport you wish to take up. The cbr250 is an excellent bike that can bring years of enjoyment and fun.

All the best to you and pls keep our community informed of what you decide.

Sincerely, Debra
 

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I've been diving for years, both recreational, and technical, and have always paid attention to every detail of my training, and to the basics, on every dive. I've seen (and assisted in) a number of incidents at depth, and while very few are unavoidable, the overriding *vast* majority are suffered by those that think their training wasn't meant for them, or that violated obvious, and unfortunate, aspects of planning and executing their dives.

I don't see riding as being any different.

It seems any sport that can ratchet up the adrenalin has its inherent risks. That's what makes you grin in your helmet executing a perfect corner at 50mph. However, mitigating those risks is no big secret. You wear your helmet *and* the rest of your gear. You ride within your skill set. And, you learn everything you can: books, classes, forums...

Good luck... enjoy the bike!
 

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first thing i did was order some photon blasters and put them on the front fender of my bike..i still ride like I expect every car i see to pull out in front of me..not going to help me if i run into an intersection at high speed tho

Skene Design Motorcycle Visibility Lights
How did you wire those in? I am very interested in learning more.
 

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Was a volunteer firefighter for two years. Saw at least 8 or 9 motorcycle fatalities. All of them gruesome and sad. Lets just say dualie fords merging onto a county road, a bike doing 95, and telephone pole support wires make a potent formula for catastrophe. But you cant let that stray you. The only thing you can control is what you are doing. My dad always told me dont be scared of life, if youre destined to be hit by a bus, it will hit you, try and stay home to prevent it, and it will plow through the living room. A bit extreme i know, but hes right. Just be defensive and alert at all times. Never ever even think about drinking, ever. And you will be as best prepared you can be.
 

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My bf and I were in an accident last year on our two separate bikes. Cut off by a motorist in a blind corner. I hit a telephone pole trying to avoid him and he hit my bf head on. He shattered his femur and nearly died on the operating table. This didn't stop us, it only makes you more aware of your surroundings.
I got a new cbr (which I have since sold for an 09 r6) and my bf bought a replacement bike before he could even walk (and rode before he could even walk *shakes head*).
I can't imagine giving it up, I get way too much enjoyment out of it. Just be aware, cautious, and wear a helmet (can't believe that guy crashed a '11 graffiti edition. For shame).
 

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My husband was in a horrible crash a few years ago. The first thing he did when he hobbled out of the hospital with his walker was go check out his (totaled) bike...and buy a new one. If your a rider, your a rider. Don't let fear stand in the way of doing something you love. Accidents do happen....just ride safe and be aware of ur surroundings. Good luck!

Sent from my DROIDX using Motorcycle.com App
 

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IMO by wearing proper gear you are acknowledging the risks - not ignoring them.

With all that said, if you ride in constant fear, riding may not be for you - which is fine. In order to be able to react properly in an emergency or stressful situation you need to feel (and be) confident in your abilities and be able to keep a level head.

Jay
 

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My thoughts are, you couldn't find a better bike to learn on. However, if you're truly uncertain, the msf is inexpensive and worth 10x what you pay, really. If you do it before dropping 5-6k you'll have a clearer minded decision.

My msf a few weeks ago had us on crf230m's. Fun little bikes that aren't too far from the cbr250r in terms of handling. I paid $25 for about 18-20 hours of course time. Most of it was a bit remedial because the class literally assumes you have never been on a bike before, but I can say i took something valuable away from the very first exercise to the last.
 

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if you're truly uncertain, the msf is inexpensive and worth 10x what you pay, really. If you do it before dropping 5-6k you'll have a clearer minded decision.
A good idea.

If you are reluctant about motorcycling, don't do it.

If you are merely unsure, give it a go..... take some kind of riding course, then decide.

For me, as a farm kid, there was no decision involved. It was just something we did. Just the same with kids around where I live at present; it is the way people get around.
 
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