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Hi all

Just want to check with other CBR 250 with ABS owners. My rear abs braking sytem is rather 'soft' in which it hardly stops the bike unless I am going really slow like below 30 mph. Furthermore , I do need to really press the foot brake pedal hard in order to get it done.

Basically, i need to rely heavily on the front brake to get the bike to stop everytime . Not sure whether this is the standard performance for CBR 250 with abs or otherwise.

Thanks
 

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Hmmmm I have the ABS version and can't say I have that issue. Yes the front has more stopping power than the rear but thats with all bikes. the ABS also links the braking system so it should theoretically operate both to avoid excessive slippage but increase stopping distance. Theres a lot of giveaway for the back break. don't know what else I can tell ya except have a technician try it out that can bench mark it against another abs model
 

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Break - In

Hi all

Just want to check with other CBR 250 with ABS owners. My rear abs braking sytem is rather 'soft' in which it hardly stops the bike unless I am going really slow like below 30 mph. Furthermore , I do need to really press the foot brake pedal hard in order to get it done.

Basically, i need to rely heavily on the front brake to get the bike to stop everytime . Not sure whether this is the standard performance for CBR 250 with abs or otherwise.

Thanks
How many miles (Kilometers) on the cbr?

.
 

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just remember that the front brake is designed to do about 70% of the braking. the rear brake is used to compliment the front, not stop the bike. i only use my rear brake when I'm down shifting so i can rev match with the throttle then i use both to stop the bike. the rear brake is also used to adjust the attitude of the bike in more technical manoeuvres and to help slow down the engine quicker when the bike is in gear. if you are trying to only use the rear brakes to stop the bike you may find yourself in some tricky/ dangerous situations. the cool thing about the ABS on this bike is that they are connected and even though you may not be comfortable with using a lot of front brake, you can grab them as hard as you can and not worry about locking up the wheels.
 

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Why are you trying to stop the bike with the rear brake?

Thats not what its for.
 

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just remember that the front brake is designed to do about 70% of the braking. the rear brake is used to compliment the front, not stop the bike. i only use my rear brake when I'm down shifting so i can rev match with the throttle then i use both to stop the bike. the rear brake is also used to adjust the attitude of the bike in more technical manoeuvres and to help slow down the engine quicker when the bike is in gear. if you are trying to only use the rear brakes to stop the bike you may find yourself in some tricky/ dangerous situations. the cool thing about the ABS on this bike is that they are connected and even though you may not be comfortable with using a lot of front brake, you can grab them as hard as you can and not worry about locking up the wheels.
Exactly what he said. I really hope you aren't only relying on ABS. And that you know how to correctly brake on your bike. :(
 

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Normal. When you brake, weight shifts forward and decreases the effectivenesses of the rear brake. Use lots of front and a little rear on this bike because the rear is connected to a piston in the front caliper and helps the front brake harder. Rear is kind of useless, but is true for most bikes.
 

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It's good form on the street to apply both brakes simultaneously in most situations, but the rear brake is only really useful - on the street - for keeping a stopped bike stopped.
 

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Hi all

Just want to check with other CBR 250 with ABS owners. My rear abs braking sytem is rather 'soft' in which it hardly stops the bike unless I am going really slow like below 30 mph. Furthermore , I do need to really press the foot brake pedal hard in order to get it done.

Basically, i need to rely heavily on the front brake to get the bike to stop everytime . Not sure whether this is the standard performance for CBR 250 with abs or otherwise.

Thanks
Same, and it doesn't seem right to be based on the CBR125s I used during my course. At 30, the rear will do nothing really, but I notice the same thing at about 5-10mph as well (parking lot speeds). Mine has 159km on it atm.
 

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You *should* be able to really stomp on that rear brake pedal on the bike. It's better to get in the habit of using both, and mostly the front, but ABS on both wheels + combined braking from the pedal = STOMP -- or so the theory goes. ;)

Edit: Scratch this. Book says in the ABS models that the braking is combined, meaning applying either the hand brake or foot brake will apply both to some degree, but the distribution of force is different for each control. Use 'em both when stopping like you're supposed to.
 

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Hi all

Just want to check with other CBR 250 with ABS owners. My rear abs braking sytem is rather 'soft' in which it hardly stops the bike unless I am going really slow like below 30 mph. Furthermore , I do need to really press the foot brake pedal hard in order to get it done.

Basically, i need to rely heavily on the front brake to get the bike to stop everytime . Not sure whether this is the standard performance for CBR 250 with abs or otherwise.

Thanks
The front brake is what should be used most if not all the time.

I only use the rear brake when I am approaching a stop light or where I have to brake quickly. Even in those instances think I am using mostly my front first then I apply the rear brake to help it out. The rear brake is applied when I am close to a full stop and so that my right hand can catch a breather.

I have never knowingly engaged my ABS yet.

The rear brake does feel somewhat soft (I don't know compared to yours though) but it is effective. I can feel my bike slowing down considerably.
 

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The rear is pretty "soft". If you hit it hard, the combined ABS applies the front and the bike stops. It takes a second for the front to apply. What's nice is that the abs handles any lockup. Try stopping a few times with the rear only. Youll really get how it works.
 

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soft pedal

I recognize exactly the problem you describe. Statically the pedal is perfectly firm but on the road it sinks down as the ABS cuts in long before there is any hint of lock up. This negates any benefit you might get from the linked brakes because the front is released as well.

It is essential to balance the use of both front and rear even more than with a normal system and until this is mastered the brakes are quite dissappointing.

I'm thinking of verifying this by removing the ABS fuses and doing a short test with rear brake only. I won't be going far like that though!

Regards Roadster
 

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Remember that the weight transfers forward to your front wheel as you brake hard.
When you first apply the brakes, it's a 70% front and 30% rear braking force application. As you start slowing, you will feel the weight transfer forward causing your front suspension to dive. At that point, 90% of your braking power is from the front and only a measly 10% is coming from the rear. This is on an ABS equipped bike. Without ABS, you can get your rear wheel off the ground in a hard braking maneuver ( called a stoppie or an endo ) and have 100% of your braking power coming from the front caliper.
In Advanced MSF courses, you learn to progressively add more braking force to the front caliper and progressively decrease braking force to the rear caliper during hard braking exercises.
 

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If the CBR's ABS brakes are indeed linked (not sure), there's no reason to use the rear brake pedal at all for normal stopping.

In that case, using the front brake will give you some amount of rear automatically, which in most situations would be optimum. By itself (not linked), the rear is pretty much worthless in any situation where you really need to stop immediately.

Either way, you are way ahead by focusing your concentration on the front in any situation that requires serious braking.


Jay
 
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