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ABS model, or not? Which do you have?

  • Yes!

    Votes: 20 37.7%
  • Nah

    Votes: 29 54.7%
  • I dunno....

    Votes: 4 7.5%

  • Total voters
    53
  • Poll closed .
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i have the black with ABS. Added safety plus worth paying the extra for a good system on an entry level bike. I am sure it will help resale value too.
 

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I went with non ABS.
Although I would love to have it for wet riding, where I live ABS is a liability.

All ABS systems have brake release problems when going over bumps. If a bump makes the rear tire lift just a bit the computer thinks it's lifting (stoppie) and releases the brakes in the name of stability.

It's worse in lighter bikes than heavier ones. Having fully adjustable suspension can help but not eliminate this 'feature'. The BMWF800ST is notorious for this and weighs 100 lbs more than the 250. The new Ducati multistrada also exhibits this 'feature' as does the BMW S1000R and many, many others. The best system seems to be that on the CBR1000RR but sadly, that is not what is on the 250R.

The road I commute on has a craptacular 8 or 9 mile section that is a combination of asphalt and concrete. The asphalt is nothing but potholes and alligators. The concrete is buckled up everywhere from tree roots growing underneath. Considering the Honda weights 359 lbs wet (368 for ABS) I can only imagine how long it would take to stop on this road should a deer step out in front of me. And there are lots of deer and other furry critters in my area. I imagine I'd be releasing and re-applying the brake lever (to reset the system) like a mad man.

If the ABS system was switchable I would have gone for it and I DO suggest it for new riders or riders who ride smooth road surfaces all the time.
It's just not a good idea for me and my specific conditions.
 

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I went with non ABS.
Although I would love to have it for wet riding, where I live ABS is a liability.

All ABS systems have brake release problems when going over bumps. If a bump makes the rear tire lift just a bit the computer thinks it's lifting (stoppie) and releases the brakes in the name of stability.

It's worse in lighter bikes than heavier ones. Having fully adjustable suspension can help but not eliminate this 'feature'. The BMWF800ST is notorious for this and weighs 100 lbs more than the 250. The new Ducati multistrada also exhibits this 'feature' as does the BMW S1000R and many, many others. The best system seems to be that on the CBR1000RR but sadly, that is not what is on the 250R.

The road I commute on has a craptacular 8 or 9 mile section that is a combination of asphalt and concrete. The asphalt is nothing but potholes and alligators. The concrete is buckled up everywhere from tree roots growing underneath. Considering the Honda weights 359 lbs wet (368 for ABS) I can only imagine how long it would take to stop on this road should a deer step out in front of me. And there are lots of deer and other furry critters in my area. I imagine I'd be releasing and re-applying the brake lever (to reset the system) like a mad man.

If the ABS system was switchable I would have gone for it and I DO suggest it for new riders or riders who ride smooth road surfaces all the time.
It's just not a good idea for me and my specific conditions.

any extra reading on this bump issue?
 

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There's lots of info on this to be found on the internet. Google it and you'll find lots of stuff good and bad.

If it wasn't for that one particular road I would be 100% pro ABS. It can and has saved lives.
Let me put it this way, if I won the Lotto and didn't have to work anymore, I would get an F800ST with ABS (awesome light weight sport tourer) despite the fact that it probably gets the most complaints regarding brake release (some report losing up to two car lengths of distance after hitting a bump on dry surfaces).

I can not ignore the fact that taking longer to stop is a fair trade for not dumping the bike. If I was traveling around a lot, riding new roads often, I would rather have it than not but this 250 is a commuter on roads I know like the back of my hand. And there's that one nasty rough road...

As I said in my first post, those new to our sport should go with the ABS.
With ABS they can practice using the brakes without fear of locking the wheels. The trick is to get good enough to be able to stop quickly and in and a short distance without activating the ABS.
 

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Non ABS for me. While I reckon it is a great offering for $500, I wanted to minimise complexity....yep...I know, pi*s weak excuse considering it's still an EFI bike.
 

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Non-abs was the only one available from _my_ dealer at the time(and they're still out of 'em so I'd still be waiting for ABS).

I'm pretty good at stopping so I'm not too worried, but would have liked to have it for resale value.

'njoy,
awk
 

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ABS for me

Or will have an ABS CBR. Finally have a date my CBR250RAB will be in. I ordered it with $$$ down in March. It should be here Sept 25, 6 months later. I have been rather patient, if I don't say so myself. I wanted an ABS model since day one. I do not want to ever go down again when I apply the front brake, and I want to be able to stop fast on all types of surfaces. No motorcycle I have ever owned has had ABS, but I sure like the idea. I could have had a non-ABS 3 mos. ago, but I resisted; already have 2 others like that.
 

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IAll ABS systems have brake release problems when going over bumps. If a bump makes the rear tire lift just a bit the computer thinks it's lifting (stoppie) and releases the brakes in the name of stability.

It's worse in lighter bikes than heavier ones.

I'll certainly test it & report on its characteristics & quirks, if any. I understand it works very fast making 100 corrections per second so I doubt I would notice it. I also understand it has very compliant suspension so bouncing off the road should be a rarity.

You mentioned you had bumpy roads so maybe its a bigger issue for you than me. Around here the road is full of idiots which I've come to learn to expect the nonsense from any of them.

Never ride faster than your guardian angel can fly. ;)
 

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I do not want to ever go down again when I apply the front brake, and I want to be able to stop fast on all types of surfaces.
Not trying to start an argument, and promise I won't participate in it if that's where it goes....

The only way to assure that you will never go down when you apply the front brake is to never apply the front brake (a truly bad idea). If your lean angle plus braking force overwhelms the traction available, ABS may not save you - particularly if the surface is loose.

In addition, most tests indicate that while ABS is more consistent, it does not stop faster than properly applied non-ABS brakes in stopping. In fact, the CBR manual specifically states that ABS will take longer to stop than a non-ABS bike. Progressive braking near the limits of adhesion is the fastest way from X to zero.

The above may sound like I'm knocking ABS - but it's a safety system designed to be your last resort. Your goal should be to practice braking until you can swiftly and efficiently stop your bike in the shortest possible distance. If ABS has to save you often, the day will come when even the electrons can't move fast enough to keep you upright.

As always, my opinion - but shared by people who know a lot more about riding at the limits then I ever will.

BTW, yes, my CBR is non-ABS and no, I have no regrets not waiting for an ABS-equipped bike.

RIDE SAFE!
 

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Metalstorm, I had a 1992 Honda Accord and had the same problem with over-sensitive ABS although my problem was on icy roads. I sometimes had to jam on the parking brake to avoid a collision. So I installed a switch in the wire that led to the ABS fuse. I presume the same could be done on the CBR 250R. I believe if the fuse is blown then the system reverts to non-ABS
 

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I'll take non-ABS

When i took my MSF class i learned on a non-ABS bike. I felt like the repetition of that put in my head to always use both brakes but to understand the power of the front in particular. Of course its a personal preference but since i learned on a non-ABS i felt most comfortable purchasing a non-ABS.
 

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Metalstorm, I had a 1992 Honda Accord and had the same problem with over-sensitive ABS although my problem was on icy roads. I sometimes had to jam on the parking brake to avoid a collision. So I installed a switch in the wire that led to the ABS fuse. I presume the same could be done on the CBR 250R. I believe if the fuse is blown then the system reverts to non-ABS
If one could install a switch without it throwing an error code that would be sweet!

While I am confident that I could match or better stopping distances against an ABS bike on dry roads, I guarantee an ABS bike will best me every time on a wet road. A switch would allow the best of both worlds.

What I like most about the BMW GS bikes & pretty much most of all the modern adventure bikes is that little on/off switch for the ABS system.
 

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I intentionally chose the non-ABS model. I had more than enough budget for the ABS model, but I decided against it. I wanted a basic bike with which to get very good at riding. I want to learn how to do it without a crutch, so when I get something very nice later on, I won't require the ABS.
 

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If one could install a switch without it throwing an error code that would be sweet!

While I am confident that I could match or better stopping distances against an ABS bike on dry roads, I guarantee an ABS bike will best me every time on a wet road. A switch would allow the best of both worlds.

What I like most about the BMW GS bikes & pretty much most of all the modern adventure bikes is that little on/off switch for the ABS system.
You could just try pulling the fuse. It is unlikely that it would do any harm since a fuse is meant to blow if there is an overload. It might result in an error code that may or may not result in the ABS re-starting. I think it would be a simple thing for the dealer to reset the code. If the ABS does re-start when you replace the fuse then you have your answer - buy a switch!
 

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Abs

I didn't know a bike could stop so fast until getting the 250R ABS. It's a revelation. Definite safety improvement.. not only for the reduced stopping distance but the ability to steer around an obstacle while braking.
 

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You could just try pulling the fuse. It is unlikely that it would do any harm since a fuse is meant to blow if there is an overload. It might result in an error code that may or may not result in the ABS re-starting. I think it would be a simple thing for the dealer to reset the code. If the ABS does re-start when you replace the fuse then you have your answer - buy a switch!
That would be worth trying.
I almost wish I had the ABS model just to try it out :)
I bet an electronic/computer whiz could build a plug in module that could trick the system so that no codes would appear.

I love these conversations. They keep the wheels in my head turning :D
 

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I didn't know a bike could stop so fast until getting the 250R ABS. It's a revelation. Definite safety improvement.. not only for the reduced stopping distance but the ability to steer around an obstacle while braking.
Don't push it. A car with ABS will maintain manouverablity under heavy braking. If you try steering under heavy braking on a motorcycle you will be on your arse long before the ABS kicks in.
 
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