Honda CBR 250 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 125 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
445 Posts
I have found that the 250 seems to stand fairly upright when you put it on the side-stand. Every other bike I have had experience with leaned over much farther and seemed more stable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
999 Posts
Park bike in gear. Preferably 1st gear but any gear will do just so long as its not neutral.

Also turning the bars full lock to the left will give the bike a minuscule amount of extra lean compared to the bars being straight or full right.

That's all I got at the moment.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,916 Posts
I've never really trusted the kickstand on my bike. Always struck me fairly unstable. If you're not setting it when bike is facing downhill or on an absolute flat, it feels "tentative." The kickstand itself is relatively short, but the distance from its attachment point to where it meets the ground is too long ... in that it doesn't allow for the bike to lean over far enough to create the resistance needed to keep it upright. Not sure I'm describing this clearly enough. But today, it happened. Yep, sad to say, she went down, from a complete stop... kickstand down, I got off the bike and over she went. I'm so frustrated with myself for not making sure the bike was solid, but also peeved that "DANG! It shouldn't be that delicate!"
Anyone else feel this way? Do many/most of you wind up replacing your kickstand? Any suggestions?
(btw, minimal damage to my bike as it fell into my boyfriend's leg. Yeah, he's thrilled. :mad:)
And yes, I did put "kickstand" in the search function... nothing relevant came up that I saw. If you already know of a link discussing this topic, I'd appreciate being directed that'a'way. Thanks!
Also, anyone have/tried one of these? 1112 Honda CBR250R Kick Stand Kickstand Lowered A
Did your bike fall on its left side, or on its right side?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
I like to push the side stand all the way fwd with my foot before letting it touch the ground. I learned this on day 2 of ownership in my garage, where she almost fell over because the stand wasn't all the way out. Also, +1 on cranking the handlebars to the left and then letting her down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
409 Posts
I like to push the side stand all the way fwd with my foot before letting it touch the ground. I learned this on day 2 of ownership in my garage, where she almost fell over because the stand wasn't all the way out. Also, +1 on cranking the handlebars to the left and then letting her down.
Handlebars to the left was a part of the drill at MSF.

I too have found the stand on this bike to be a little suspect on un level ground.

I think no center stand because there is no kick starter either. I miss having a center stand, not the kickstarter though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
GREAT suggestion phatch, about making sure the stand is fully extended before leaning the bike on it. Will def start doing that.
I think you have discovered your error. You should have no problem with the bike stand now.
For what it is worth, here is my bike standing on a flat surface.
lean.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,226 Posts
solid sidestand must be a compromise, thus parking must
take into account bikes/sidestands geometry etc..
on level flat ground, in gear, left steering lock on,
the bike should be stable enough..
however its not always level or even on suburban roads etc
which can exceed potential parking strategies if theres a
low section beneath the stand, say, when best to place
your ready made piece of hard rubber, such as a sink plug
or any, convenient piece of rubber, or timber offcut,
or whatever.. at home [parked on kerbed sloped road]
i park her in a bike spot resulting in stand on the downhill
side, resulting in not enough reach for the stand, so i have
a nice rounded curved rock there, worn to the stands foot,
which gives a good secure position [unless some fool
sits on it and lets it fall over!]..

anything about the size of a cigarette pack fits in pockets
and does the trick when extra length is required or handy..
you could fill a pack with cement or rubber or whatever..

i pull her back tire into the kerb after securing sidestand,
releasing and applying front brake with a finger, then
take hold of the left side handle/grab rail with right arm
hold left [locked] bar, take a stable position and then
attempt to 'rotate' bike, pivotting from her tire contact
point with the kerb, which wont actually move her far
but will settle her weight and mass into the stand
and bike/road dynamics..
i find there are left over movement potentials wherever
the bike touches the ground including within stand hinge etc,
which can be settled with this simple final settling 'trick'..

[if you leave the bike parked facing downhill, there will be
a risk of potential movement, downhill, as a factor of
mass and potential momentum, especially! if in neutral..
if there is even slight movement in downward direction
then the stand, which folds back, into its flush position
is ready to do that movement,, thus rolling off stand..

if the bike is leaning over to the left [stand side] where
stand is too short for the road surface, you can test it
by holding the same rear handle and bar and pulling
[gently, with care] the bike towards its stand foot,
which will expose potential fall over to the left
if the bike feel like continuing as you pull
onto stands foot.. this is where even a strong
wind in some places can be enough to topple
her beyond her balance point[!]
if this is how it feels to you, best place something
under the stands foot to raise it a bit, sufficient
to result in not, being able to pull it towards you..

those adjustable side stands have been created
for our bike as a perceived need.. a product..
you need to adjust them according to the road etc,
so might as well simply put a rubber block or [?]
under the stand foot, takes no time, can be
positioned finely with your left toe together
with turning the steering left/leaning left..

if you work with wood its easy to make
a block nicely slanted to suit stand angle..
even an old rubber boot heel or [?]...

this is one area where theres no real
downside to taking a couple of minutes
to secure the motorcycle on her stand..
if the road is uneven in the spot i park
then we simply move to a better spot..

also consider where you park in relation to
cars.. eg, if a car has a cover on it you can
assume it wont be moved for a while..
next to a formed driveway is good as it
means free space one side..
best to park in front of a car than its rear
where some drivers simply dont check
and may back into your bike..

we must be good citizens etc, but,
if theres no suitable parking spot for
black beauty, she doesnt mind the
footpath, close to a wall etc..
its not a car its a motorcycle
which must be parked according to
its special single track geometry etc,
so treat parking as a skill and
challenge and [of course] fun :)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,916 Posts
I think you have discovered your error. You should have no problem with the bike stand now.
For what it is worth, here is my bike standing on a flat surface.
View attachment 4914
Still, her bike would not have fallen to the right side if it was a case of the side stand folding back into the up position... it would have gone down on the left side. Bonnie likely had the bike parked with the left side of the bike into a slight incline, causing it to be nearly upright. As your photo illustrates, when parked on flat and level ground, I don't see how this bike could fall to the right side all on its own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Maybe I'm speaking a bit out of turn, but my side stand works just fine. IMO, it is the rider's responsibility to ensure that they are parked on a surface that is correct for the task. if it is hot and the surface is in question, I would suggest a stomped sown can, or what ever other device one could find to spread the weight/load. The bike doesn't just fall on the right side because it was parked correctly and the wind blew.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
nwanting to do better at parking my bike doesn't mess with your need to reflexively find fault with me. IMO.
Bike falling over to the right is a problem with you. Read the manual. If you can't do this it worries me what you must be like riding as it's the very first thing you are taught when you touch the bike, how to get on, how to get off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Wait, wait...wait...

Are you serious with this Bonnie and Clyde thing? I mean...really?
I noticed that too.

For what it's worth, the bike (seemingly) not leaning over all that much was one of first things I noticed the first time I climbed off of it.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,916 Posts
There is no "inherent design issue" with the side stand on the CBR250R. Motorcycle manufacturers, like Honda, don't just take an educated guess at how long the side stand should be, or what the angle of the side stand is relative to the frame when it is extended, for a given bike... it is an engineered component, just like everything else is on the motorcycle.

The only issue here is where the owner chooses to park the bike, and that owner taking responsibility for whether the bike is going to be stable in that particular place. As an example, if the owner parks the bike on new asphalt in the hot summer sun, and the side stand sinks into the pavement and the bike falls on its side, you can't blame the road construction company, can you? Any more than you could blame Honda for making the side stand too long, or too short, for the particular place you happened to park your bike.

It's not rocket science...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
The manufacturer of any 2 wheeled vehicle can control how it sits on level ground but not how or where the rider parks it. If that's too much effort then get 4 wheels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
617 Posts
I keep with my cbr at all times a little 4"x4" square of rubber backed heavy duty carpet
(from a piece of 2'x2' carpet tile). It easily fits in the locker under the seat, and can be very useful when the surface is soft. I also have (in a separate gear bag) a piece of 1/4" x 8" x 8" plywood for sand, crushed stone, etc. These have proven themselves very useful.
I actually "preset" these pads before leaving the bike by pushing the weight onto the stand. If I don't like the feel or angle I start again.
Hope this helps.

Rick
 
1 - 20 of 125 Posts
Top