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I haven't checked mileage lately yet I think its around 4k or so. I usually just have the tripodometer on. Anyway, is there a time I should replace the battery even if it runs well and I have no problems?
 

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I've been running a Yuasa battery that was new in 2013! Have over 20k miles on it. Still cranks great, no issues. I'll probably replace it just because it's been so long, probably before our next long ride.
 

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Motorcycle batteries typically last about 3 years. Mine just passed that mark. I will replace it the first time that I have a "hard start" that isn't fixed by putting it on the battery tender. On my dirt bike, I replace it with the first hard start, as I do not want to be trying to push start a bike back in the boonies (think of a sandy river bed).
 

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I bought my bike in April 2013 and I'm still currently on the original battery with 32300km on the clock. Still starts like it was new.

Sent from my SM-N910H using Tapatalk
 

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2013? 3 years? I can beat that.
I'm still using the original battery in my 2011 CBR250R. My CBR was the first one off the truck and the first CBR250R sold at my dealership the very first year the bike was released. It's probably the oldest 1st model year CBR250R in this part of the country
The first accessory I bought for it was a battery tender and I've kept it hooked up any time the bike isn't being ridden. If the engine isn't running then the battery tender is.
In 5 years of winter storage in an unheated shed it has never once failed to start up on the first crank in the spring and I've had no battery-related problems whatsoever since day one.
I'm sure one of these days it may give up the ghost purely from age alone, but as of today it gives no indication at all that it doesn't intend to last forever.
From my experience I believe that I owe this longevity 100% to the maintenance function of the battery tender. A lot of people don't use their tenders unless they have a problem starting, or if the bike is going to sit for a few weeks. Or they'll let the bike sit for a few weeks and only then decide to hook it up. The device is designed to keep your battery in top shape and prevent it from discharging. I think that any time you allow your battery to discharge, even a little bit, it negatively impacts the integrity of the battery and the effect is cumulative over time. The bike may still start, but those continual discharges may effect the battery's ability to build back to and hold the optimal charge it was designed to hold fresh from the factory. At least that's my theory based on my own empirical evidence and I'm sticking to it. lol.
 

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2013? 3 years? I can beat that.
I'm still using the original battery in my 2011 CBR250R. My CBR was the first one off the truck and the first CBR250R sold at my dealership the very first year the bike was released. It's probably the oldest 1st model year CBR250R in this part of the country
The first accessory I bought for it was a battery tender and I've kept it hooked up any time the bike isn't being ridden. If the engine isn't running then the battery tender is.
In 5 years of winter storage in an unheated shed it has never once failed to start up on the first crank in the spring and I've had no battery-related problems whatsoever since day one.
I'm sure one of these days it may give up the ghost purely from age alone, but as of today it gives no indication at all that it doesn't intend to last forever.
From my experience I believe that I owe this longevity 100% to the maintenance function of the battery tender. A lot of people don't use their tenders unless they have a problem starting, or if the bike is going to sit for a few weeks. Or they'll let the bike sit for a few weeks and only then decide to hook it up. The device is designed to keep your battery in top shape and prevent it from discharging. I think that any time you allow your battery to discharge, even a little bit, it negatively impacts the integrity of the battery and the effect is cumulative over time. The bike may still start, but those continual discharges may effect the battery's ability to build back to and hold the optimal charge it was designed to hold fresh from the factory. At least that's my theory based on my own empirical evidence and I'm sticking to it. lol.
+1
The 2nd worst thing you can do to a battery is not use it and the worst thing you can do is not use it AND let it discharge.
Ive been running a lithium Ion battery in my CBR's the last 3 and half years and it has just died now.
 
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+1
The 2nd worst thing you can do to a battery is not use it and the worst thing you can do is not use it AND let it discharge.
Ive been running a lithium Ion battery in my CBR's the last 3 and half years and it has just died now.
Hi Kiwi rider,
Not meaning to differ, but, for batteries a deep discharge can be beneficial. Why?? A battery on constant trickle charge with periods on load, can develop characteristics, I.E. on/off loading can shorten the time it can maintain a discharge before volts and current drop off. That is why battery back-up systems have periodic planned maintenance of 'deep discharge'.

If you are storing a bike, battery is on trickle charge, every weekend you start the bike and then shut it down? That can shorten the life of a battery. Better to have the battery on trickle charge overnight on the day you have started it.
Realise that many people may disagree, but 38 years of Merchant ships and DP drill-ships power generation, control and back-up systems mean I have seen it in practise 1977-2015.

Your point of not using it and letting it discharge/go flat is correct, it has been known for a fully discharged battery to reverse it's own polarity.
Also a flat battery! it's internal plates will breakdown quicker, thereby creating a sludge at the bottom shorting out all the plates, more prevalent in Alkaline batteries, sometimes a flush and new concentrate could recover the cell
 

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Isn't the usual approach to battery storage to apply a trickle charger once or twice during the winter just long enough to bring it to full charge it and then again just before using?

I will admit to bringing the battery inside when I did not have a trickle charger and lived in Butte, Montana. That was just common sense.

One last thought. A marginal battery makes the charging system work harder.
 

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The original battery in my 2006 SV lasted 8 years. I never trickle charged it when in storage, just charged it at 2A for a couple hours every other month or so, then just before I was ready to ride again.

Don't let a battery discharge and freeze, but you don't need to constantly charge it either.

If anyone is starting their bike up to "warm it up" and charge the battery, you are doing more damage than good. Change the oil just before storing, start it up and run it for 30 seconds to circulate the new oil, and don't start it again until it's time to really ride it. Starting for short periods, or extended idling without actual normal riding, deposits acids in the oil and contributes to increased moisture in the engine which promotes corrosion.

Charge the battery if needed, but don't run the bike to do it.
 

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I've always believed in the phrase "If it ain't broke, don't fix it".

At work it's policy to have the batteries hooked up to a charger. If we have to disconnect it for a long period of time, it cannot exceed 3 months in storage. Otherwise a battery characteristic called Sulfation occur.

Google says:
Sulfation, a build-up of lead sulfate crystals, is the number one cause of early failures of lead-acid
 

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I was re-reading this post because I just now replaced the battery in my 2011 cbr250. Got the exact same battery, a Yuasa AGM. So, over 7 years with the first Yuasa! I bought my cbr new in 2013 and the dealer replaced the battery for me before picking it up. When I took out the old battery I noticed a good bit of corrosion on the positive terminal and I had cleaned the terminals just a couple of months ago. I interpret this as the old battery was beginning to overcharge, a sure sign of failure on the way. I do not use a battery tender. I do have a trickle charger that I use every great once in a while to top it off. Other than that I just crank the bike at least once a month when it's in storage for the winter.
 

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Remarkably, my 2011 CBR250R and it's original battery will be celebrating their 10th Anniversary soon.
I still keep it on a tender whenever it's idle and am completely convinced at this point that it's the main reason the original battery has never failed to start my bike for an incredible 10 years (and counting.)
That and the fact that Honda makes one hell of a machine, of course.
 

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It's not good idea to keep lead-acid battery fully-charged all the time. Nor is it good to fully-discharge it. This causes chemical-reactions to generate lead-sulphate crystals on surface of plates and inhibit capacity which reduces power and lifespan of battery.

Tenders keeping battery fully-charged at "float maintenance" 13.6-13.8v full-time is way, way too much for long-term storage. That's stage-7 on sophisticated chargers such as Ctek 8-step charger (provided by BMW & Porsche as OEM charger).

After battery has reached stage-7 Full-Charge Float-Maintenance, it's allowed to relax at stage-8 Long-Term Storage. This turns OFF charger and lets battery drain to 95% (weeks). At which time, it's pulsed-charged back up to only 99% and charger turns off again to let battery self-discharge back to 95%. This allows battery to last years under Long-Term Storage and not get fried by 100% Float-Maintenance mode like tenders do.
 
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