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Discussion Starter #1
Like the title says. I'm pretty nervous about it and afraid I'm going to mess things up. I was never into cars and I probably won't ever be.

But I want to work on my bike as much as I can. Should I take it to the mechanic instead?

If I should do it myself, should I buy everything (oil filter etc) from Honda?

My location is Cape Town, South Africa if there are any fellow countrymen out there.

For reference I will be following this video:

And what else should I do/know? Should I change the brake fluid? If so then link me the best possible video.

I will be browsing this forum and doing my due diligence. I am just a beginner and anxious about doing this.
 

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It's the best way to learn about the bike. I've done mine since I got it. I don't think I ever took it back the dealer to have any services done. It's done over 25000km now and no trouble at all.

Make VERY SURE you have the oil filter the right way. These seem to be a common thing to be messed up and will destroy the motor. The little rubber seal goes towards the motor, it should hang on the little piece that sticks out and then the spring pushes it on there. All that will make sense once you have it apart.

The only other thing is to not overtighten the filter cover. I use a 1/4" drive ratchet as they only need to be done up snug, not too tight. If you have any leakage, just do them up a tiny bit more.

Good luck.
 

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Yes - learn to do it all yourself.

As shown in the video, be very careful to install the oil filter correctly. Even "Mechanics" have screwed that up.

There have been many many instances of professional mechanics making mistakes with basic service. You need to learn to do it all yourself. There are too many basic maintenance items that need to be done or checked regularly to be taking it to a shop all the time.

Changing the brake fluid is easy. If it's not terrible, you can siphon out the oil fluid and refill the reservoir with fresh. If you do that regularly you don't need to bleed the calipers. Just keep an eye on the color and swap it when it starts to get darker. Bleeding is the best, but does require a bit of knowledge and careful execution.

Make sure your chain is in good condition, lubed, and properly adjusted.



There may be more helpful maintenance videos on the Canyonchasers site as well.

Not sure what's available in S.A. for oil, but Shell Rotella T5 10W-30 is a good choice if you can get it. I like a synthetic or synthetic blend oil for the CBR, as it doesn't hold much. Not a fan of GN-4. The Honda filter is fine.

Let us know if you have any other specific questions.
 

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And yes, the Honda oil filters used to say "this side out" on the side without the seal. I assume that they still do. I have always purchased OEM parts and the Service Manual. That is all that it took to learn to do the routine stuff (oil changes, chain adjustment, valve adjustment, replacing fork oil and brake fluid).
 
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While it's standard procedure for other riders on a forum like this to encourage new owners to do their own repairs, I'm going to offer a different opinion. If you lack any experience working on cars or bikes, I wouldn't attempt doing an oil change on your CBR as your first maintenance project unless you feel completely comfortable attempting it and you understand the process completely. The chances of installing the filter backwards is a real concern (I have installed - and then removed - my oil filters several times over the years to "double-check" that I installed it properly and one time I almost DID) and the chances of breaking an oil filter cover bolt are only magnified for someone who has never done it before. Changing the oil and filter on my CBR takes a lot more "finesse" than I ever had to worry about on other bikes I've owned, which were all a fairly straightforward process without worrying too much about filter orientation and over-tightening bolts. I've worked on my own car and bike engines for decades, but doing an oil and filter change on my CBR still causes me a slight degree of anxiety even after doing more than a dozen of them successfully.
I am by no means saying you shouldn't attempt it. Doing your own maintenance gives a great sense of accomplishment and can be a lot of fun, just don't feel that it's a REQUIREMENT of being an owner or succumb to any pressure you may feel to "do it yourself" if you aren't 100% confident in your ability to do it. In that case you're far better off taking it to a dealer than encountering a problem after the oil and filter are removed from the bike.
If you do decide to try it, your biggest ally is knowledge and familiarity with how your bike works. Don't just study one YouTube video. Watch as many as you can find. Even the badly-produced videos may have tips not found elsewhere and the more information you can absorb the better in building your confidence and familiarity with the process.
I highly recommend the "sticky" thread on oil changes found here to use in conjunction with any videos:
Even after performing multiple oil changes on my CBR, I still review this excellent DIY thread every time I do it.
If you still have any doubts about your ability to complete an oil and filter change after reading and viewing everything you can find on the subject you're better off taking it to the dealer. While it's great to be able to do these things yourself, an oil and filter change on the CBR is not something I would recommend someone with no mechanical skills to try as their first attempt at doing their own maintenance. Especially considering the filter orientation and bolt breakage issues that have been posted on this forum over the years.
That said, if you do eventually get to the point where you fully understand the process and feel confident of your capabilities - go for it and good luck!
 

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As beginner, I highly recommend getting familiar with tools and learning to use them. Most important is torque wrench. Human's "calibrated hands" tend to overtighten small fasteners and undertighten big ones. This has been proven time and time again. While experienced master mechanics can get in ballpark of manufacturer's recommend torque, they still can't beat the worse torque-wrench's +/- 20% accuracy range.

So get 3/8" torque-wrench, clamp socket-square into vice and practice setting various torque values found in manual. Then pull on handle and get feel for how much force it takes to >click< torque-wrench. Note that on low-torque settings, there won't be any click, but more of dull >clunk<.

Lots of spots on bike are difficult to reach, so it's good to have trained nimble hands. While watching TV or other mindless tasks, I'll practice threading nuts onto bolts of various sizes with my left-hand only. I'll do it with palm up and palm down. Really makes working on bike much, much easier, quickler and less error-prone.
 

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I'm a bit of a beginner too, I bought the oil change kit from honda and I did it for the first time myself.

I could not have done it without the right tools and a second person to help me hold things as well as tell me not to unevenly tighten the screws back because it's fairly easy to accidentally break that little flat silver ring they give you.

Petrol dipped my whole chain because it was easier than cleaning and it took all the muck off like magic.
Lubed my chain after that however after this it has gotten some minor rust spots so, idk if the petrol was the problem.



It's very very easy to undo the bolt drain the oil and put new oil in, but yeah opening the bike just be very mindful and careful not to over tighten or unevenly when you're replacing that case thingo.
 

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Don't use petrol to clean chain, it'll damage rubber O-rings. Kerosene would be limit of volatility to be used. Anything stronger like petrol or acetone should be avoided.

I think that's in Honda manual somewhere. Then again, I recall Honda recommending 90-weight gear-oil for lubing-chain. Probably in '80s manual.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
While it's standard procedure for other riders on a forum like this to encourage new owners to do their own repairs, I'm going to offer a different opinion. If you lack any experience working on cars or bikes, I wouldn't attempt doing an oil change on your CBR as your first maintenance project unless you feel completely comfortable attempting it and you understand the process completely. The chances of installing the filter backwards is a real concern (I have installed - and then removed - my oil filters several times over the years to "double-check" that I installed it properly and one time I almost DID) and the chances of breaking an oil filter cover bolt are only magnified for someone who has never done it before. Changing the oil and filter on my CBR takes a lot more "finesse" than I ever had to worry about on other bikes I've owned, which were all a fairly straightforward process without worrying too much about filter orientation and over-tightening bolts. I've worked on my own car and bike engines for decades, but doing an oil and filter change on my CBR still causes me a slight degree of anxiety even after doing more than a dozen of them successfully.
I am by no means saying you shouldn't attempt it. Doing your own maintenance gives a great sense of accomplishment and can be a lot of fun, just don't feel that it's a REQUIREMENT of being an owner or succumb to any pressure you may feel to "do it yourself" if you aren't 100% confident in your ability to do it. In that case you're far better off taking it to a dealer than encountering a problem after the oil and filter are removed from the bike.
If you do decide to try it, your biggest ally is knowledge and familiarity with how your bike works. Don't just study one YouTube video. Watch as many as you can find. Even the badly-produced videos may have tips not found elsewhere and the more information you can absorb the better in building your confidence and familiarity with the process.
I highly recommend the "sticky" thread on oil changes found here to use in conjunction with any videos:
Even after performing multiple oil changes on my CBR, I still review this excellent DIY thread every time I do it.
If you still have any doubts about your ability to complete an oil and filter change after reading and viewing everything you can find on the subject you're better off taking it to the dealer. While it's great to be able to do these things yourself, an oil and filter change on the CBR is not something I would recommend someone with no mechanical skills to try as their first attempt at doing their own maintenance. Especially considering the filter orientation and bolt breakage issues that have been posted on this forum over the years.
That said, if you do eventually get to the point where you fully understand the process and feel confident of your capabilities - go for it and good luck!
Thanks for the balance. i am nervous but I will have someone helping me out who has some bike knowledge. I can't say I understand (since I'm not a mechanic) but I feel confident now after watching the video and asking the bike shop guy about any tips. Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes - learn to do it all yourself.

As shown in the video, be very careful to install the oil filter correctly. Even "Mechanics" have screwed that up.

There have been many many instances of professional mechanics making mistakes with basic service. You need to learn to do it all yourself. There are too many basic maintenance items that need to be done or checked regularly to be taking it to a shop all the time.

Changing the brake fluid is easy. If it's not terrible, you can siphon out the oil fluid and refill the reservoir with fresh. If you do that regularly you don't need to bleed the calipers. Just keep an eye on the color and swap it when it starts to get darker. Bleeding is the best, but does require a bit of knowledge and careful execution.

Make sure your chain is in good condition, lubed, and properly adjusted.



There may be more helpful maintenance videos on the Canyonchasers site as well.

Not sure what's available in S.A. for oil, but Shell Rotella T5 10W-30 is a good choice if you can get it. I like a synthetic or synthetic blend oil for the CBR, as it doesn't hold much. Not a fan of GN-4. The Honda filter is fine.

Let us know if you have any other specific questions.
The recommended brand is this one MOTUL 5100 10W40 4T ROAD HIGH PREFORMANCE TECHNOSYNTHESE - MX24

Adnd I hav a specific question: does the brand of filter matter? I bought it at Honda but the guy at the shop said it doesn't really matter.

Another question: how do i level the bike? I don't have that rear bike stand.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Don't use petrol to clean chain, it'll damage rubber O-rings. Kerosene would be limit of volatility to be used. Anything stronger like petrol or acetone should be avoided.

I think that's in Honda manual somewhere. Then again, I recall Honda recommending 90-weight gear-oil for lubing-chain. Probably in '80s manual.
Noting this. Will look for an alternative.
 

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Kerosene in one of those little misting spray bottles works very well. You ideally need at least a rear stand though. You can do it without one, but it is a bit more difficult as you either have to lean the bike up on the side stand and move the wheel and chain a small amount at a time or roll it forwards or backwards a bit at a time. With a rear stand, you can turn the wheel with one hand and spray with the other. It also makes lubing the chain a lot easier. They aren't very expensive, so it would be worth your while getting hold of one.

As for the oil, you can drop the old oil on the side stand anyway as the drain plug is on that side of the bottom of the motor, when I refill mine, I usually have the bike on the side stand and just stand it upright to check the oil level when refilling as the rear stand tends to make the bike lean towards the front so it is hard to get an accurate level in the window. Having a front stand would make that easier as the bike would be level but higher up, not that it is a hard task as it is anyway.

Filters don't seem to differ much, I've used aftermarket filters pretty much the whole time I've owned mine and never had any trouble with them. I use castrol oil in mine, but I'm in Australia and our prices are a lot more than in the USA... I've used 10w40 the whole time though and it seems the handle the temperatures we have here pretty well.
 

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As beginner, I highly recommend getting familiar with tools and learning to use them. Most important is torque wrench. Human's "calibrated hands" tend to overtighten small fasteners and undertighten big ones. This has been proven time and time again. While experienced master mechanics can get in ballpark of manufacturer's recommend torque, they still can't beat the worse torque-wrench's +/- 20% accuracy range.
Just to clarify...DO NOT use a torque wrench on the oil filter cover bolts. It's one of the most common ways to break them. There are plenty of sad stories here on the forum from people who used one.
Some people use a socket wrench, but I prefer to use a small hand-held nut driver that gives better "feel".
 

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Just to clarify...DO NOT use a torque wrench on the oil filter cover bolts. It's one of the most common ways to break them. There are plenty of sad stories here on the forum from people who used one.
Some people use a socket wrench, but I prefer to use a small hand-held nut driver that gives better "feel".
I would agree. Those small M5 or M6 bolts just need to be snug. I like a 1/4" drive ratchet for most bolts in that range.

Trying to reach the torque spec is dangerous. Sometimes the numbers are just off, as my youngest son when he followed the correct factory torque spec for the rear sprocket nuts on his R6 - and stripped a bunch before reconsidering...
 
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