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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Brakes are for stopping. Engines are for going. Keeping the clutch in and dropping down through the gears with the clutch still in is taught as the correct way to approach a red light in all US motorcycle safety courses. Blipping the throttle to match revs down through and engaging every gear for engine braking when approaching a red light is an advanced riding technique and is dangerous on wet roads especially on this bike with it's ultra low first gear. It is expressly discouraged in the beginning rider's safety course, adds unnecessary wear and tear to your bike, and wastes gas.
 

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Nup.. I'm not bitin haha.

Well I will a bit.. dont coast folks.. ya on a motorcycle, not some old farmer in his truck in 1950 throwing it into angel gear to save some fuel.
Take control and dont lose that connection between Brain/hand/throttle/motor/clutch/gearbox/chain/sprocket/wheel/tyre/traction/road surface.

Just sat thru a classroom on this very subject most of the day last sunday between sessions when we discussed rev matching without unsettling the bike on downchanges without slipper clutches.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Blipping and engaging every gear as you down shift for engine braking is an advanced technique for racers. It is not as safe on a wet street for normal riders as coasting. If they misjudge their speed/ gear selection into second or first, the rear tire will skid out from under them and swat them to the ground.
 

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In the redwoods the road is often a bit slick from fog dripping out of the trees or from the schmutz the trees drop. I often coast on steep inclines just to minimize the chance of sudden, jerky deceleration. Been riding that way for 15 years and it works for me.
 

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Hmm. I have always blipped, on instinct I guess, because I like to have the engine where it is always 'engaged' and to know exactly where it's at. All bikes are different as to the exact RPM, but i always try to have the bike close to the RPM where there is enough torque or compression going through to the back wheel for best traction forwhatever is needed, accelerating or braking.

Having said that I do need to be more careful with the CBR250R as 1st gear is so low, I have skidded the back wheel out once or twice. But that mainly happens when I am not being mindful. Coming into a light or a tight corner I blip down fairly quckly, just feeling the traction enough before going down again. On the occasion that i have stupidly skidded the back wheel out I just was on "automatic".

Coasting for me is what I do on a gentle slope at slow speed down from my house when I am warming the bike up and don't feel like sitting around. Otherwise, as Auffit puts it, "angel gear" is just not being in control of the bike. A lot of people in Indonesia - village people, farmers, girls on the way to school - do the angel gear thing to save gas, often cutting the engine. It's hairy and scary to watch them flying down a hill side and then suddenly have to stomp on the brake or squeeze the lever because of something just popping up. At that point all I do is pray for them.
 

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What the MSF teaches is perfectly fine for both new and experienced riders. The idea that you are not in control of a bike just because the clutch is pulled in is nonsense. On the street, for every rider who wished he was in gear, there are three guys who wished they hadn't skid out through inattention.
 

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Take control and dont lose that connection between Brain/hand/throttle/motor/clutch/gearbox/chain/sprocket/wheel/tyre/traction/road surface.
this is $$$$$$$$$$$:cool:
thanks Aufitt , you suck (just kidding):D

my bike wants to meet you (on the track):)
told her you live with the kangaroos (far away):mad:


btw- coasting and rolling , not the same thing :confused:
this is coasting @ 0:18 :D:D
 

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.....The idea that you are not in control of a bike just because the clutch is pulled in is nonsense. On the street, for every rider who wished he was in gear, there are three guys who wished they hadn't skid out through inattention.
The first part is a matter of opinion and riding style.

The last sentence is interesting, do you actually have statistics on this?
 

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wished they hadn't skid out through inattention.
Sorry to quote just that and this isn't directed at you. This is just general but I think that sums it all up right there.

Inattention.

The idea behind blipping the throttle is to keep things smooth & predictable.
When the clutch is engaged the engine rpms drop fast but the rear wheel rpms drop much, much slower. If you pull the clutch, downshift and engage the clutch you will get a wonderful lurch in your drivetrain. This can cause a rear wheel skid, especially on a wet road. By blipping the throttle you get the engine and rear wheel rpms somewhat matched by the time the tranny is re engaged so the chassis stays settled and the rider stays in control.

If this thread is really about rolling to a stop in the last 10-20 feet at jogging speed or slower with the clutch lever pulled in I suppose it won't make any difference so long as you don't need to suddenly accelerate to avoid such things as dogs or blind drivers.

I personally am with Aufit and the others who like to be connected and in full control at all times.
 

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Sorry to quote just that and this isn't directed at you. This is just general but I think that sums it all up right there.

Inattention.
exactly. deadly on a bike.

The idea behind blipping the throttle is to keep things smooth & predictable.
........

If this thread is really about rolling to a stop in the last 10-20 feet at jogging speed or slower with the clutch lever pulled in I suppose it won't make any difference so long as you don't need to suddenly accelerate to avoid such things as dogs or blind drivers.
if it's just the last 20 feet at 10km an hour, pull the clutch in by all means.
But if you are coming up to lights (or a tight corner) down from 80-100kph without blipping (that it is going down the gears clutch in all coasty and 'smooth') it just means you are relying completely on your brakes to slow you down, and you are doing ALL the work, without the engine compression helping you. At this point maybe an automatic scooter would be more the thing. (OK now I am taking cover).
 

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I guess you have access to plenty of good, cheap brake pads :D
I'll bet my brake pads last 3 times as long as yours. My 93 Honda Civic VX had more than 50% left at 63,000 miles.

Not sure how you associate coasting with brake wear that just throws away your inertia for nothing, or clutches, or transmissions.

regards
Badger
 

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Hmm. i always try to have the bike close to the RPM where there is enough torque or compression going through to the back wheel for best traction forwhatever is needed, accelerating or braking.

Coming into a light or a tight corner I blip down fairly quckly, just feeling the traction enough before going down again.
I feel you on this. I am getting better at doing this - blip down and when you feel traction blip again, just by practicing.

Do you two finger on the brake and use the palm to blip?

I never blip from 2nd gear to 1st though. I either let it coast from there or I wait till the rpms drop before switching to first. I tried it and get jerky when bliping from 2nd gear high rpm to first.
 

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Lol, its pretty hard to make it skid enough to lose control. I've done some pretty impressive slides. I've only ever had the tire chirp on downshifts, never slides out. When I smashed the brakes one time the back kicked out 30* though.
 

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I'll bet my brake pads last 3 times as long as yours. My 93 Honda Civic VX had more than 50% left at 63,000 miles.
Here we are on the internet, and you can figure out my brake wear?

Not sure how you associate coasting with brake wear that just throws away your inertia for nothing, or clutches, or transmissions.

regards
Badger
It was a facetious remark. The idea being if you only use your brakes, you use more of them. There is absolutely no science to it.
 

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Lol, its pretty hard to make it skid enough to lose control. I've done some pretty impressive slides. I've only ever had the tire chirp on downshifts, never slides out. When I smashed the brakes one time the back kicked out 30* though.
You have ABS or non-ABS?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Lol, its pretty hard to make it skid enough to lose control. I've done some pretty impressive slides. I've only ever had the tire chirp on downshifts, never slides out. When I smashed the brakes one time the back kicked out 30* though.
You must be more of a fair weather rider. Mess up a down shift in a wet corner and the bike can throw you down.
 

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You must be more of a fair weather rider. Mess up a down shift in a wet corner and the bike can throw you down.
In a corner is a totally different situation that I don't believe you specified. In fact you said while slowing down for a red light. I try to stay a fair weather rider but I have been caught in the rain a few times or gone out after the rain quite a few times. But the fact is I now have 4 vehicles, I don't need to ride the bike in bad weather. I can take out my Jeep, BMW, or Audi S4

You have ABS or non-ABS?
Non ABS
 
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