Honda CBR 250 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've okay with fast turns but it seems at slow speeds, say at turn-light making a left-hand turn in 1st gear I find that the rear wheel feels like it lacks traction. I'm guessing this is mostly a technique issue. What's your body positioning when making slow-speed turns so as to keep the rear wheel stable? I do give it a bit of throttle but what else should I be doing?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,284 Posts
Countersteering along with the right amount of throttle and in very slow speeds, use the rear brake along with clutch and throttle control. Body position, as in counter balancing, has some impact. Countersteering is what makes the biggest difference. Throttle, clutch
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
What kinds of roads is it happening on? Lotsa debris i.e. rocks/dirt/grass clipping/etc? Have to say the only time I've noticed the back end loose was driving in my yard/gravel driveway. Under normal turns in town it feels pretty planted. As low as first is geared you could probaly upshift to second....like a car in the snow. That way there is less of a chance of rear wheel slippage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
Not doing anything special with my body, rear tire feels fine. I usually feather the clutch a bit on right handers so the bike isn't so sensitive to the throttle. Left turns from a stop, I haven't noticed anything special, but if your throttle hand isn't steady you might want to try a bit of clutch there as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Maybe I'm leaning too much, it just doesn't feel stable. I'll try using counter-steering (pushing on the handlebars) more...see how that works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
Really slow speeds? (parking lot) -- Feather the clutch to keep it in the friction zone and also ride the rear brake a little to stabilize the bike.

If you are going fast enough to actually countersteer, then I'd say the above doesn't apply though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Thats funny, as a noob I thought it was just my imagination, but your right the rear wheel does slip. I think he means in like 10-15 mph turns, not super slow. I find the rear while sliding into the turn at times. Don't have the knowledge to know why or what I'm doing.

Can you make a 90 degree turn counter steering?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
From a stop if your rpms are too high in a slow turn you can break the rear tire loose. ive done it a couple times.
From a stop and turning im usually in second gear half way thru the turn,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
^same as TBC, My streets are pretty clear here, except when it rains then im driving like a granny through it feathering the throttle through the turn but still would be around 2nd gear, I think if i try 1st with too much throttle i imagine sliding sideways lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
+1 on 2nd gear right after the bike starts moving... Much easier to control with the throttle and feathering the clutch.

Below 10mph, I don't think I counter-steer at all... Rather counter-balance...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,284 Posts
^@ very slow speeds more throttle, clutch and light rear brake.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,284 Posts
Riders underestimate counter steering. They feel they have to throw their bodies off the bike in order to steer. Read and watch twist of the wrist. Counter balancing certainly plays a part but it is more efficient counter steering that make a bigger difference. I've learned that riders can steer in the direction they want at 3mph with counter steering alone. As well, look where you want to go. This applies through twisties as well as intersections. Maintain speed through the corner and be careful of the speed you enter the corner as well. Maintain traction control on your rear wheel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
You can't counter-steer at 5mph. Its just simply steering, a turn of the wheel. If you're going ~10-15mph+ then counter-steering starts to take effect. I would think you guys knew this?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,284 Posts
It is simple steering. Whether riding a motorcycle or 2 wheeled bike. I'm surprised you don't know this? The principle is always there. I counter steer at 10kph all the way down for street for practice and plain fun to see how nimble the bike is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,551 Posts
Countersteering isn't something I actively think about.

I learned how to ride a bicycle at 5 and motorcycle at 11. Maybe that's different than learning as an adult?

Just seems like a natural thing to me.:confused:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,284 Posts
^Well said. Many years ago when ppl learned to ride they didn't have MSF courses, books or videos to watch. They hopped on their bikes and rode. Today, terms such as counter-steering and counter-balancing have become apart of the lingo. When I talked to guys who have been riding for 30 yrs and I mention counter-steering they look at me like i'm an alien. Really, at the end of the day, efficient steering requires counter-steering at all speeds as we are always making suttle changes to keep our bike on course. We become more aware of it at faster speed as we must apply a little more force.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,996 Posts
If you can spin up the rear tyre,
from a standing start,
without wheelieing,
without any front brake (unlike when you do a rolling burnout)
while sitting,
round a corner
keeping it in first..

you got skills.. dont change a thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
^Well said. Many years ago when ppl learned to ride they didn't have MSF courses, books or videos to watch. They hopped on their bikes and rode. Today, terms such as counter-steering and counter-balancing have become apart of the lingo. When I talked to guys who have been riding for 30 yrs and I mention counter-steering they look at me like i'm an alien.
I think this is due in part to the unfortunate fact that, in the automotive world, counter steering has an entirely different meaning and purpose. I don't know which group coined the term, or who "stole" from who, but overall it makes more sense in the automotive sense than the motorcycling sense.

I honestly wish the term was replaced in the motorcycling world with something more descriptive of what's going on.. gyro-steering maybe, though that would just confuse our Greek friends.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,284 Posts
I think this is due in part to the unfortunate fact that, in the automotive world, counter steering has an entirely different meaning and purpose. I don't know which group coined the term, or who "stole" from who, but overall it makes more sense in the automotive sense than the motorcycling sense.

I honestly wish the term was replaced in the motorcycling world with something more descriptive of what's going on.. gyro-steering maybe, though that would just confuse our Greek friends.

I agree. Thanks for the input. :):)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
At slow speeds do not lean with the bike and go in second gear (feather clutch as needed). You have to counter balance your weight opposite the turn. What made it click for me was I would have my knees against the bike and one time I stuck my knees out and found it way easier to counterbalance. Did that a little and wasnt long before it became natural.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top