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Discussion Starter #1
After reading this article now, i wont be afraid to open u my throttle, all this years i thought what an "easy break in" isnt what exactly is best for your car. or well bike.. great write for newbs like me

thanks to Break In Secrets--How To Break In New Motorcycle and Car Engines For More Power

What's The Best Way To Break-In A New Engine ??
The Short Answer: Run it Hard !


Why ??
Nowadays, the piston ring seal is really what the break in process is all about. Contrary to popular belief, piston rings don't seal the combustion pressure by spring tension. Ring tension is necessary only to "scrape" the oil to prevent it from entering the combustion chamber.

If you think about it, the ring exerts maybe 5-10 lbs of spring tension against the cylinder wall ...
How can such a small amount of spring tension seal against thousands of
PSI (Pounds Per Square Inch) of combustion pressure ??
Of course it can't.

How Do Rings Seal Against Tremendous Combustion Pressure ??

From the actual gas pressure itself !! It passes over the top of the ring, and gets behind it to force it outward against the cylinder wall. The problem is that new rings are far from perfect and they must be worn in quite a bit in order to completely seal all the way around the bore. If the gas pressure is strong enough during the engine's first miles of operation (open that throttle !!!), then the entire ring will wear into
the cylinder surface, to seal the combustion pressure as well as possible.


The Problem With "Easy Break In" ...
The honed crosshatch pattern in the cylinder bore acts like a file to allow the rings to wear. The rings quickly wear down the "peaks" of this roughness, regardless of how hard the engine is run.

There's a very small window of opportunity to get the rings to seal really well ... the first 20 miles !!

If the rings aren't forced against the walls soon enough, they'll use up the roughness before they fully seat. Once that happens there is no solution but to re hone the cylinders, install new rings and start over again.

Fortunately, most new sportbike owners can't resist the urge to "open it up" once or twice,
which is why more engines don't have this problem !!

An additional factor that you may not have realized, is that the person at the dealership who set up your bike probably blasted your brand new bike pretty hard on the "test run". So, without realizing it, that adrenaline crazed set - up mechanic actually did you a huge favor !!

Warm the engine up completely:
Because of the wind resistance, you don't need to use higher gears like you would on a dyno machine. The main thing is to load the engine by opening the throttle hard in 2nd, 3rd and 4th gear.

Realistically, you won't be able to do full throttle runs even in 2nd gear on most bikes without exceeding 65 mph / 104 kph. The best method is to alternate between short bursts of hard acceleration and deceleration. You don't have to go over 65 mph / 104 kph to properly load the rings. Also, make sure that you're not being followed by another bike or car when you decelerate, most drivers won't expect that you'll suddenly slow down, and we don't want
anyone to get hit from behind !!

The biggest problem with breaking your engine in on the street (besides police) is if you ride the bike on the freeway (too little throttle = not enough pressure on the rings) or if you get stuck in slow city traffic. For the first 200 miles or so, get out into the country where you can vary the speed more
and run it through the gears !

Be Safe On The Street !
Watch your speed ! When you're not used to the handling of a new vehicle, you should accelerate only on the straightaways, then slow down extra early for the turns. Remember that both hard acceleration and hard engine braking (deceleration) are equally important during the break in process.

Yeah - But ...
the owner's manual says to break it in easy ...

Notice that this technique isn't "beating" on the engine, but rather taking a purposeful, methodical approach to sealing the rings. The logic to this method is sound. However, some will have a hard time with this approach, since it seems to "go against the grain".

The argument for an easy break-in is usually: "that's what the manual says" ....

Or more specifically: "there are tight parts in the engine and you might do damage or even seize it if you run it hard."

Consider this:
Due to the vastly improved metal casting and machining technologies which are now used, tight parts in new engines are not normal. A manufacturing mistake causing a tight clearance is an extremely rare occurrence these days. But, if there is something wrong with the engine clearances from the factory, no amount of gentle running will fix the problem.

Q: What is the most common cause of engine problems ???
A: Failure to:
Warm the engine up completely before running it hard !!!

Q: What is the second most common cause of engine problems ???
A: An easy break in !!!

Because, when the rings don't seal well, the blow-by gasses contaminate the oil with acids and other harmful combustion by-products !!

Ironically, an "easy break in" is not at all what it seems. By trying to "protect" the engine, the exact opposite happens, as leaky rings continue to contaminate your engine oil for the rest of the life of your engine !!
 

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Not sure what to think about all of this. Seems if it was better to run it in hard the manufactuer would advise you to do so. I have always been told it takes time for the parts to polish each other, such as the crank to the rod bearings. The engine will run smoother and turn easier once this has been done and breaking it in hard only puts un nessary pressure on the motor before its ready for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
As for breaking it in hard im skeptical too as well, as for the sealing of the rings against the wall it would make sense, but as for your rod bearings , and crank, is in a bushing type bearing, and as long as its lubricated it should be fine.

That what I'm under the impression.
 

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Easy vs Hard? The Wrong Question

The discussion of Easy vs Hard Break-in focuses on the wrong criteria, and creates potentially more problems than it solves. With the understanding that it is not the purpose of the article.

"Easy" may implies many things, but usually translate into a vision of getting on the highway at 55mph for endless miles until the Break-in is done.
"Hard", on the other hand, may come across as racing your way to many happy miles ever there after.

In this time and age of Headlines, it is very easy to form a picture out of them. In both cases, they are probably wrong. Both extreme are far from what the manufacturers instruct to do.

Guys, don´t make too complicated. Just follow the manufacturer instructions and you would enjoy years of trouble free engine operation. By the way I use "instruct" on purpose as it is connected with warranty claims.

Bike makers are only interested in customers having a positive experience, so they come back next time they are shopping for a new bike. The conspiracy theories of fat cats wanting to screw you by giving instructions leading to premature engine wear, just don´t hold water. Customers put their money on brands with proven track records.

:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The discussion of Easy vs Hard Break-in focuses on the wrong criteria, and creates potentially more problems than it solves. With the understanding that it is not the purpose of the article.

"Easy" may implies many things, but usually translate into a vision of getting on the highway at 55mph for endless miles until the Break-in is done.
"Hard", on the other hand, may come across as racing your way to many happy miles ever there after.

In this time and age of Headlines, it is very easy to form a picture out of them. In both cases, they are probably wrong. Both extreme are far from what the manufacturers instruct to do.

Guys, don´t make too complicated. Just follow the manufacturer instructions and you would enjoy years of trouble free engine operation. By the way I use "instruct" on purpose as it is connected with warranty claims.

Bike makers are only interested in customers having a positive experience, so they come back next time they are shopping for a new bike. The conspiracy theories of fat cats wanting to screw you by giving instructions leading to premature engine wear, just don´t hold water. Customers put their money on brands with proven track records.

:eek:
Is it the wrong question?

If your refering to fat cats, wouldnt the manufaocur ie the bike brand be the fat cat, since they dont technically wantyou to own your bike forever. So could their info be the info dystorying your bike? Or motor?

Even so there are technicalities in breaking in an Engine in the article it does make sense to seal up your pistons rings properly, otherwise you cylinder walls may need to get re honed and, then you may have a motor that burns excessive amounts of oil.

Manufactures only tell you what they think is best for their product, they only tell you whats best based on how long they think you will keep their product an how long they think it will last. I really doubt the dude who made the article is a fat cat trying to eat your money, car dealers and bike dealers are the fat cats, and bringing your car to a "manufacture approved shop" is already costing an arm and leg.

From the sounds of it it just seems like your sitting on the fence with this question of you jsut belive what the manufature is "always right" . and that they are not the crooks trying to eat away at your money.

For the record i just use the easy break -in method.
 

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todays engines are engineered to hardly even need a "break-in." you'll be fine riding it as youo normally would on a daily basis. just don't sit at a single rpm band for extended periods of time for the first 500 or so miles. the "easy" break-in will break in an engine just fine, why would you worry about a manufacturer lying to you? at least one as reputable as Honda.
 

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Yeah modern day engines are engineered to last, or so they say, and with honda's previous track record, their motors with huge amount of abuse still last till they are into the ground!

So i don't think Honda minds or cares how you break in the motor.
 

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todays engines are engineered to hardly even need a "break-in." you'll be fine riding it as youo normally would on a daily basis. just don't sit at a single rpm band for extended periods of time for the first 500 or so miles. the "easy" break-in will break in an engine just fine, why would you worry about a manufacturer lying to you? at least one as reputable as Honda.
Agree!

Break-in is all just driving it normally. I rented a car once and it had 24 miles on it, BRAND NEW. and i know for sure it wasn't done the break-in process if that even mattered. So i guess sometimes it's just not needed.

But

guys who build engines and tuning shops that tune engines usually do a REAL break-in on those engines they rebuild, and thats where i think it matters.
 

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Most in the know adhere to:

Let it get to running temperature.
Run it hard with lots of engine braking - up to the high revs then let it engine brake down to the low revs. Do this throughout the gears.

Stop to let it cool down. Then repeat all this 3 or so times.

Ride it hard for 150km or so, without it sitting at single at rpms for long.

Change oil and oil filter.
 

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How long to get to normal running temperature? In case you need ambient temps let's assume it's between 50-60f degrees.
 

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Break in

Guys, Please listen.

Break in as recommended by virtually every engine manufacturer is for the purpose of thoroughly seating the rings prior to subjecting them to the highest pressures required during hard acceleration and high loading.

On a microscopic level the honed bore gets finely scratched by the rings and the "seating" is that the fine grooves match like a hand in a glove the grooves between the rings & bore. Once the grooving matching occurs during your first several hundred miles, the piston sealing will sustain greater pressure with less blow by that will maximize the power produced and your performance.

I remember a guy where I grew up (in the 70's) that said the way to break in a new engine was to drain all the oil & fill the crankcase with kerosene. He claimed the greater friction would seat the rings quicker. He might have been right. Unfortunately, he likely scored and ruined his bearings because the hydrostatic capability of the low viscosity kerosene probably failed to float his mains.

Don't believe everything you read.

Kutter
 

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Guys, Please listen.

Break in as recommended by virtually every engine manufacturer is for the purpose of thoroughly seating the rings prior to subjecting them to the highest pressures required during hard acceleration and high loading.

Don't believe everything you read.

Kutter
I'd go with Kutter on this.....

But in the end it's your bike, your choice. Most people who buy a new vehicle don't keep it until the end of its useful days, so it's in the end it doesn't matter to them anyway.

I don't go along with this conspiracy theory that (reputable) manufacturers recommendations are based on wanting to foreshorten the useful life their products to force consumers to buy new ones. The Hondas I have owned have all been second hand. I have no idea of how they were run (broken!!) in, but I know they have been reasonably well maintained (otherwise I would not have bought them) and I have had a good run out of them.

Different engines are made using different processes and alloys. The boffins who design them probably have a some idea of how each should be run in. I would be inclined to follow their recommendation.

It has worked for me for maintenance. I do keep vehicles for a long time.
 

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What's The Best Way To Break-In A New Engine ??
The Short Answer: Run it Hard !

!
Ahh another crapsite that say they know better than Honda..

But ok you do that, but i wil break my in what Honda says - remember they had the experince with it, they have been producing engines since nearly the year 1900 :)
 

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If I was selling warrantied bikes I'd be telling the customers to 'baby them' too.

As with everything, some people will follow, some people will want to learn about it themselves. It's all good. :)
 

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If I was selling warrantied bikes I'd be telling the customers to 'baby them' too.

As with everything, some people will follow, some people will want to learn about it themselves. It's all good. :)
Theres a word called Warranty, here in dk that last for 2 years when buying new, and i know from my dealer its possible to see if it has been run hard - so no warranty :)
 

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Yup. And they'll notice how much better it is running too. :D

If it looks like the piston on the left:



It's been broken in soft. :)
There are several things that reveal it has been breakd in hard :)

Personally i stick with the big manufactures that has testet and testet their engines again and again with quality products.
Remember its Honda, its not at cheap copy chinese engine we are dealing with :)
 

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@ kim from what redline said.. the piston on the left looks to not be sealed properly.. the rings looks as if they are all burning crazy amounts of oil, while the piston on the right looks untouched!
 

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The manual for this bike will discuss engine break-in. The owner can choose from that point how they want to break-in the engine. I suspect most of us will try follow the manufacturers recommendations. I have had engine service techs and service managers tell me that modern engines will not seat the rings properly if synthetic oil is used from the beginning unless it is recommended by the manufacturer ( some cars are delivered with synthetic from the factory). Their reasoning is that synthetic is so slick that it does not allow proper wearing in. They recommend using conventional motor oil for anywhere from a few thousand miles to up to 10,000 miles or more in cars or trucks. Extrapolating for higher rpm motorcycles, if you like synthetic oil , possibly you should wait until at least the break-in miles are complete or possibly longer......
 
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