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Hey guys,

I've got my CBR250R for almost 2 months now and I've got around 2500kms on it... However despite it being a relatively new bike, I often get a burning smell when I'm riding at low speeds or stopped at an intersection. Does anyone else have similar experiences?

I got it second hand so I'm not sure what the previous owner has done to it... But I never shift above 6k rpm and have been a very sensible rider since it's my first bike. I've also checked all the oils, coolant and fluids to make sure that they are all within spec. My temp gauge also never goes above 3 bars.

Over the period I've been doing some slow speed riding, e.g. finding the friction point, riding on the clutch etc and I've stalled a number of times (<10) and in these situations the burning smell is really quite strong. Could it be that I've burnt the clutch?:confused:

Any advice is appreciated!
 

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Do an oil & filter change and see how it goes.
 

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It could be a partially burned clutch and oil from too much repeated practicing. It could also be some left over cleaning stuff/ storage protectant that the last owner used. Some guys will hose down all the metal on a bike or snow mobile with WD40 before storing it away for winter and this will give off a smell forever more once you do that. My bike had a slight smell of CorrosionX for a long time.
 

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If my CBR gets so hot that the cooling fan starts I notice a "burning" type of smell, but I've always attributed it to a new bike getting real hot for the first time and heating up new components that aren't normally that hot.
I had the same smell with my new Ninja250 the first few times I ran it hard (or got stuck in traffic). I think it's fairly normal for a new engine, but if you're still getting a burning smell that doesn't lessen as you put more miles on the bike you may want to have a dealer check it out for sure.
 

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I noticed a burning smell too and just associated it with it being a "new" bike.
Not all the time mind you but every so often.
 

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If the smell is like pungent smell, then nothing to worry, the catcon is doing its job that's all. I get to notice it sometimes even now.
 

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Have close to 1800 miles, and used to notice it more... it seems to have abated with time (and I've actually been riding it much harder -- shifting up around 8k, and going WOT when conditions allow :) ). Almost never happens any longer... Once in a great while, I'll catch a wiff... but, I think that's just the catalytic converter...
 

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Over the period I've been doing some slow speed riding, e.g. finding the friction point, riding on the clutch etc and I've stalled a number of times (<10) and in these situations the burning smell is really quite strong. Could it be that I've burnt the clutch?:confused:

Any advice is appreciated!
While feathering the clutch occasionally is okay when the riding situation calls for it, I would recommend breaking yourself of the habit of doing it frequently, if that is what you mean by "riding on the clutch". Start to think of the clutch lever as an On/Off switch... either fully engaged, or disengaged. If you are in the correct gear for a given speed, you shouldn't have to be feathering the clutch much at all. Off road racers who feather the clutch a lot, due to their riding technique, know that the cost of doing business is clutch replacements. Most of those guys are running high end aftermarket clutches to begin with, which will stand up to way more abuse than a stock clutch.
 

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I'm no mechanic, however, I thought the wet clutch on our bikes was designed to ride, feather, and use as an adjunct to throttle control, as opposed to car dry clutches that can burn out from the same behavior....

Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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i asked the same thing when i got the bike..it is the exhaust curing..it will never go away completely..but will abate as time goes on..i still get a whiff of mine especially when its sitting idling while hot..but no where near like it was when the bike was basically new
 

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I'm no mechanic, however, I thought the wet clutch on our bikes was designed to ride, feather, and use as an adjunct to throttle control, as opposed to car dry clutches that can burn out from the same behavior....

Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Motorcycle.com Free App
with that way of thinking you should join the clutch of the month club.
 

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I'm no mechanic, however, I thought the wet clutch on our bikes was designed to ride, feather, and use as an adjunct to throttle control, as opposed to car dry clutches that can burn out from the same behavior....

Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Motorcycle.com Free App
And your thinking is correct!!
 

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I'm no mechanic, however, I thought the wet clutch on our bikes was designed to ride, feather, and use as an adjunct to throttle control, as opposed to car dry clutches that can burn out from the same behavior....

Sent from my DROID BIONIC using Motorcycle.com Free App
Definitely not. Anyone continually playing with the "friction zone" of any clutch for more than a few seconds at a time will soon be buying a new clutch. Whatever instructors that are telling people to practice finding the friction zone and not telling them to ride the bike for a minute in between to let the clutch cool off are doing their students a big dis-service. Maybe they should pay for the clutch job.
 

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That's utter nonsense.....talk about misinformation!! I have two bikes formerly owned by a riding school who taught students to ride in the friction zone, at a steady speed, while blipping the throttle, something every rider should be able to do. These bikes have 12 and 14 thousand kilos on them and both have the original clutches.

I practise riding in the friction zone with all my bikes regularly, it's the proper way to ride while doing slow tight manoeuvers, and have never had any clutch issues....never.

When I went to watch the law enforcement riding competition (rodeo) those guys rode in the friction zone and worked the throttle most of the way around the course, you could hear them blipping the throttle. I didn't see anyone replacing a clutch.

Operating a bike in the friction zone is not abusing a clutch.
 

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Good luck and nice knowing your clutch.
I've never had to replace a clutch, in any bike, ever.

I learned to ride in the army, the first day of training we spent the day riding in a rough field, in the friction zone, maintaining a steady speed, while using the throttle. To complete the first day and move on we had to ride beside the instructor at a walking speed for probably 15 minutes and if he heard the throttle stop "blipping" it meant more practice or flunking out.

Ever since every time I get a new to me bike I practice this in an industrial area and did so with the CBR, nothing heated up or smelled and I expect many years service from my clutch on this and my other bikes.

Telling anyone that using their friction zone is harmful is just plain wrong.

Edit: For any new riders reading this I'm not advocating routinely riding your bike around in the friction zone but knowing how to use the friction zone is a skill all riders should possess and has been part of any rider training I've received and a skill I continue to practice.
 

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i asked the same thing when i got the bike..it is the exhaust curing..it will never go away completely..but will abate as time goes on..i still get a whiff of mine especially when its sitting idling while hot..but no where near like it was when the bike was basically new
I concur. It's the exhaust/catalyzer for sure.

I wouldn't worry too much about ruining the clutch; this bike is designed for rush hour stop-and-go modulation in Bombay and Bangkok.
 
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