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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

I'm at my wit's end. I tried several times to adjust my chain slack. The bike is cold. I loosen the main axle screws (or whatever they're called in English), then the screws that keep the adjustment screws locked in place and finally I adjust the slack using the adjusters. When I reach proper slack I fasten the main axle again, check again for proper slack and then fasten the lock screws for the adjusters. Now the problem:
When I check the slack again next morning after a 50 miles ride the chain has no slack at all.:confused:
So I go over the whole procedure again and readjust the slack. Next morning after a 50 miles ride the chain again has no slack...:confused:
I've started to use a big metal pipe now to give me a longer lever on the wrench to fasten the main bolts of the axle so that there can't be any movement in the rear wheel suspension. I don't own a torque wrench but went to a dealer after adjusting my chain for the first time earlier last year and had him check the axle with one of his to make sure I fastened it with enough force and everything was ok. Now I'm already using more force then back then and the indicators on each swingarm's side don't show any movement either so that can't be the problem. Any ideas what I'm doing wrong (I mean apart from having been born...)?
 

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Side stand is usually good as well.
But you did not spin the wheel (move the bike), to find the tight spot.
The video is pointing to that.
You may have adjusted a loose spot but 1/4, 1/2 a spin around, it's again tight.
And the marker are, like you adjusted them.
So give it a try and find out
Also, if on Paddock, it may tighten a bit if back on siderstand.
Give it 5mm more slack. And check how much it is, later on ground, again
 

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raised free spinning wheel is best..
for cleaning, lubing and sighting along
top run of chain during and after
adjustment, for bowing etc..

what youre looking for is the variable..
[correct, ride, no slack]
first check chain for tight spots
[better, easier, faster with free wheel]
including after each adjustment..
could be simply the different position
of chain/tight spots on both occasions..

better allow more than less slack
to begin with, after, lube and ride..
 

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Not an exact science.

As suggested, adjust the chain to be on the loose side. Allow for tight spots that occur as the chain and sprockets get a bit of milage on them. After the initial adjustment, an O-ring chain should need little more than a squirt of lube every week or two / 500 km. When you start having to adjust the chain frequently it is probably worn out. Replace the chain and sprockets.

Setting the chain too tight will result in premature wear, and could damage sprockets.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well, the paddock stand was an instant failure. Once the bike rests on it I can hardly work on any of the screws because the stand is in the way...I'll try it one more time and if things go south again I'll bring the thing to the dealer.
 

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Well, the paddock stand was an instant failure. Once the bike rests on it I can hardly work on any of the screws because the stand is in the way...I'll try it one more time and if things go south again I'll bring the thing to the dealer.
Get the T-rex spools. It's what I used on my CBR and loved them. Never had an issue.
 

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Well, the paddock stand was an instant failure. Once the bike rests on it I can hardly work on any of the screws because the stand is in the way...I'll try it one more time and if things go south again I'll bring the thing to the dealer.
Try a different position with the Paddock stand!
Behind the axle!
Spools are fine, but most stands come without. And it works!
>:)
Oh, here a vid with a CBR250
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvyeEFPVhIQ
 

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I use hydraulic ATV jack under the bike, allows jacking up both wheels off of the ground, and I use two ratchet straps to secure the bike to the jack. Gives free access to the entire rear section, and it brings the bike up to a comfortable level to work on. Don't be afraid of a bit loose, it's far better for the motorcycle to be a little loose than a little tight. After doing my adustment in the air, I check again on the ground, and then once more have an assistant check while I'm sitting on the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Try a different position with the Paddock stand!
Behind the axle!
Spools are fine, but most stands come without. And it works!
>:)
Oh, here a vid with a CBR250
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tvyeEFPVhIQ
The problem is that I can't use my stand behind the axle. I tried it today but the lift pads (or whatever the platforms that lift the bike are called) are too wide so I would have to place the stand at a position where it would make contact with the exhaust. Anyway, I think I managed to adjust the chain now and even get the alignment right. We'll see whether it's still like that tomorrow.
 

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I always (almost) adjust my chain on the side stand, because you're supposed to do it on the stand. Off the side stand, it'll be a little too tight when you place it back down. Always adjust at the tightest spot in the chain, and I usually just roll the bike around to find it so I know the tension will be correct.
 

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The problem is that I can't use my stand behind the axle. I tried it today but the lift pads (or whatever the platforms that lift the bike are called) are too wide so I would have to place the stand at a position where it would make contact with the exhaust. Anyway, I think I managed to adjust the chain now and even get the alignment right. We'll see whether it's still like that tomorrow.
Seems you are over thinking the process. Here, from the handbook:

If the drive chain requires adjustment, the procedure is as follows:

1. Place the motorcycle on its side stand on a firm, level surface with the transmission in neutral and the ignition switch OFF.

2. Loosen the rear axle nut.

3. Loosen the drive chain lock nuts on both sides of the swing arm.

4. Turn both drive chain adjusting nuts an equal number of turns until the correct drive chain slack is obtained. Turn the drive chain adjusting nuts clockwise to tighten the chain, or counterclockwise to provide more slack. Adjust the chain slack at a point midway between the drive sprocket and the rear wheel sprocket. Roll the motorcycle forward. Stop and place it on its side stand. Recheck chain slack.

Chain slack should be: 20-30 mm (0.8-1.2 in)

5. Check rear axle alignment by making sure the chain adjuster index marks align with the rear edge of the adjusting slots. Both left and right marks should correspond. If the axle is misaligned, turn the left or right adjusting nut until the marks correspond on the rear edge of the adjusting slots and recheck chain slack.

6. Tighten the rear axle nut to the specified torque.

Rear axle nut torque: 88 N·m (9.0 kgf·m , 65 lbf·ft)

If a torque wrench is not used for this installation, see your dealer as soon as possible to verify proper assembly.

Note: most folks don't bother with this. Tightening the nut firmly with the correctly sized wrench should give you about the right torque.

7.Tighten the drive chain adjusting nuts lightly, then tighten the drive chain lock nuts by holding the drive chain adjusting nuts with a spanner.

8. Recheck drive chain slack.
 

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you can position your stand support bars under swingarm
wherever you choose, away from axle, further inboard..

further inboard less leverage lifting, but not a problem..

helps to adjust swingarm supports snugly before lifting..

as michael notes, well adjusted chain should need few
incremental adjustments, if any, well into its life
given only regular lubrication..

a breaker bar with adult male strength behind it
is more likely to over-tighten..
on the stand you can check for jamming from
over tightening by free spinning the wheel..
 

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The problem is that I can't use my stand behind the axle. I tried it today but the lift pads (or whatever the platforms that lift the bike are called) are too wide so I would have to place the stand at a position where it would make contact with the exhaust. ....
I think, the video got to that point, too.
>:)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Mystery solved. I've got a massive tight spot that encompasses almost 1/4 of the chain. So whenever I measured slack I could be at a lose side of the chain or that tight spot. Why I didn't notice that when I had her on the paddock two days ago is actually totally beyond me but today when I checked again I noticed that. Guess it's time for a new chain then. Is 21.400km (13.300 miles) a good lifetime for a chain or did I suck at maintenance?
 

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Mystery solved. I've got a massive tight spot that encompasses almost 1/4 of the chain. So whenever I measured slack I could be at a lose side of the chain or that tight spot. Why I didn't notice that when I had her on the paddock two days ago is actually totally beyond me but today when I checked again I noticed that. Guess it's time for a new chain then. Is 21.400km (13.300 miles) a good lifetime for a chain or did I suck at maintenance?
Not bad. But I got nearly 20k out of mine, and I didn't take the absolute best care of it. I did clean it on average about once every month and lubed it every two weeks or so. I did begin to develop some stuck links I had to work out around the 15k mark, which most people would have just replaced the chain at that point. But I had a lot of stretch left to go with it, so I kept a close eye on it until I got to the upper end of the limit.
 

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tie a bit of cotton thread around the chain, or hit one spot with lube,
then [on stand] turn wheel right hand, check for tight spots left finger..
one rotation is enough..

on sidestand this can also be done, parked over length of cardboard
by pulling lower side of tyre around bit by bit..

stands aren't fashion accessories..
they exist for very good reasons..

for longevity, aside from use etc,
a quick lube regularly, does wonders..
three sprays, rolling back twice
[without rear stand]
takes next to no time..
 
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