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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I like to coast and hold the clutch in and just tap down through the gears as the speed slows down. Note: I don't tap down all the way to first while coasting but rather tap down through each gear as it slows so when I'm down to 5-7 mph I will drop it to 1st gear and keep the clutch held down so I'm ready to take off when the light changes or ready to leave the stop sign. I usually start coasting at around 40mph when I'm approaching a red light or stop sign about a hundred feet away (or whatever comfortable distance), so if I need to make an emergency acceleration while coasting I will be in the necessary gear to take off, all I have to do is give it gas and release the clutch. I used this same technique when I owned a manual car and it saved on gas along with avoiding clutch and engine wear. My philosophy is it's cheaper to change brake pads then replacing a clutch.

Does anyone else use this method?

Btw, this has already been discussed on this board and there are many experienced riders that utilize this method as well.

refer to this link:

http://www.cbr250.net/forum/archive/t-2702.html


This is an excellent quote taken from a member on here with the name "Sendler":

"Brakes are for stopping. Engines are for going. Keeping the clutch in and dropping down through the gears with the clutch still in is taught as the correct way to approach a red light in all US motorcycle safety courses. Blipping the throttle to match revs down through and engaging every gear for engine braking when approaching a red light is an advanced riding technique and is dangerous on wet roads especially on this bike with it's ultra low first gear. It is expressly discouraged in the beginning rider's safety course, adds unnecessary wear and tear to your bike, and wastes gas."

Reference: Blipping the throttle down through every gear vs clutch in coasting up to a red light [Archive] - Honda CBR250R Forum : Honda CBR 250 Forums
 

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I could be wrong but I thought that too much coasting was bad for the trans. Need some mechanics to chime in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
From what I've heard coasting on the clutch doesn't cause any damage. How could it when nothing is getting worn? They say engine braking wears on the transmission and engine. I'd rather change brake pads, much cheaper.

I did the same practice in a 94 honda civic I had bought new and sold it after 7 years with about 60k miles and the kid who bought it had it thoroughly checked out by his personal mechanic and the mechanic said the tranny and engine was like new.

I ONLY coast when I'm approaching a stop where I have to come to a complete stop. Also, when I coast I coast in the appropriate gear should I need to disengage the throttle and hit the gas, it's a smooth transition.

I'm a fan of less shifting in the city.
 

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I thought it had to do something with lubricating the trans.Unlike a car transmission that has its own lubricating system. Like I said, I could be wrong. I dont think your saving much clutch wear anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Honestly, I don't do it to save on wear or gas but rather to shift less. I hate constant starting and stopping using the normal engine braking method, it's so much less stress to let it coast 100 ft or so before coming to a stop.

Here is a post on this topic:
Is it bad to coast on a motorcycle with the clutch held all the way in? - Yahoo! Answers

The pros say it won't cause wear.

Here is another post (one guy says he has doing it for 15 years and he feels it's a safer practice.)
http://www.cbr250.net/forum/archive/index.php/t-2702.html
 

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Im a closet high miler looking for the best mpg and think coasting is great. BUT. .... I'd like some one to comment on the coasting as you approach a turn... Seems to me that there is some safety and control issue when you coast into a turn and then resume power on "flight". .... Possible skid/slide outs. I'm a self thought rider but recall some where something about this.... Them again there was the traumatic brain injury thing from a slide out ;(. Not...


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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I will coast around sharp turns at a light (small intersection) that I feel I need to be cautious with. In theory, it would seem that it would be safer to coast under certain circumstances b/c when the engine is not turning the back wheel there is less chance of slipping, especially in the rain. The KEY is to be in the correct gear when you hit the throttle again for a smooth transition when you need to accelerate out of the coast.

IMO, coasting makes riding more enjoyable around the city in stop and go traffic. Constant engine breaking sucks and it feels like it wears the transmission more, i'd rather put more wear on my brake pads.

Btw, what do they teach in the MSF class? (I"m a self-taught rider.)
 

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Coasting around a turn is less dangerous than having it in gear around the turn. More traction goes to turning and less to slowing it down with engine break.
 

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'Free-wheeling' is typically considered bad practice as you don't have the ability to use power if you need it at a moments notice, since you'll have to find the correct gear then let out he clutch. I used to do this a lot when I learned to drive (on stick), but stopped a long time ago. Better practice is to 'coast' off-throttle but in gear, and downshift when required. Also if you are coming to a stop (and not just going down a hill), then use brakes as well as the above.

In terms of damaging anything -- so long as the clutch is completely disengaged from the drivetrain I don't see how it could damage anything beside maybe putting some minor wear on the clutch bearings (if it is like a car). Sitting in gear at a light (clutch in) is still preferred though so you can get away if need be...in my car I normally do go to neutral just to save the bearings a bit (and give my left foot a rest).

Anyhow, above is just my 2 cents, take it for what you will -- I'm new to bikes, so the mechanics/wet clutches in them are still somewhat 'black magic' to me (compared to cars), but I'm trying to learn as I go lol.
 

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I guess I'll use the logic of...

Its a Honda. You can beat the thing to death and it will master the english language and beg you to beat it again.

There's a reason people say Hondas last forever...especially mildly tuned commuters on four wheels or in this case two wheels.
 

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Coasting around a turn is less dangerous than having it in gear around the turn. More traction goes to turning and less to slowing it down with engine break.
This I would NOT agree with -- coasting is also slowing you down, so you are technically braking (and weight is shifting forwards in the process). Additionally, coasting means you don't have the ability to add power if needed (if you let out the clutch you might destabilize the bike mid-corner, and that would be BAD). You should be holding a constantly speed/throttle into the turn until the apex, then accelerating out.

Best practice (as taught by the instructors at my course) is to do all braking/acceleration before the corner, and once at the apex add throttle and complete the turn. Only exception is at low speed/first gear (as in, turning at a stop sign), where you'd want to ride the clutch and maybe a touch of rear brake while first making the turn.
 

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This I would NOT agree with -- coasting is also slowing you down, so you are technically braking (and weight is shifting forwards in the process). Additionally, coasting means you don't have the ability to add power if needed (if you let out the clutch you might destabilize the bike mid-corner, and that would be BAD). You should be holding a constantly speed/throttle into the turn until the apex, then accelerating out.

Best practice (as taught by the instructors at my course) is to do all braking/acceleration before the corner, and once at the apex add throttle and complete the turn. Only exception is at low speed/first gear (as in, turning at a stop sign), where you'd want to ride the clutch and maybe a touch of rear brake while first making the turn.
I agree with nearly all of this^. IMO all this "coasting is better, more fun, blah, blah, blah..." is pure B.S. with regard to how a motorcycle is designed to be operated/ridden. Unless I'm in the act of changing gears, or at a stop, my clutch is engaged, and the motor is hooked up to the rear wheel. Period. End Of Story.

P.S.: A very good book that should be on every motorcyclist's reading list, beginner and experienced alike, is "Proficient Motorcycling" by David L. Hough, published by BowTie Press, Irvine, California.
BUY THIS BOOK! IT MIGHT JUST SAVE YOUR LIFE!
 

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I wouldn't think it was bad on a four stroke engine but on a 2 stroke with premix it is bad because oil is mixed with fuel and too much coasting causes a dry lubrication problem, you would see this much more when coasting down hill with the clutch in.
But anyways while coasting the gears are still turning so I would think lubrication on a 4 stroke wouldn't hurt anything except like someone else posted if you need to make a quick move because of a object or vehicle coming onto the road you might be way out of the power band area to move quickly.
Now on a car with an automatic trans coasting in neutral thats a different story.
 

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+1 on the above. (MotoMike's post)
Every course, and book I've read on the topic (which has been a number) emphasizes constant and accelerating throttle throughout a turn to maintain the largest contact patch, and suspension stability. Hough goes into the physics in detail.

Unless I'm coming to a stop in 1st gear, I don't coast either. If someone can point me to documented use cases where engine braking is detrimentally unwise, or coasting has mechanical and maneuvering advantages, I'll keep an open mind.
 

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While coasting the transmission gears are turning, however they are NOT getting the same amount of oil as they would when the engine is running at an rpm corresponding to the road speed of the bike. In other words, there is a reduced amount of oil going to the transmission while coasting. That said the larger issue is the lack of control over the operation of the bike. Going through corners while coasting? Bad, bad idea. The very idea of it gives me the heabie geabie's. If you want to coast, get an old Schwinn Stingray... they are pretty cool. Big buck's if you can find a nice one.
 

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Coasting around a turn is less dangerous than having it in gear around the turn. More traction goes to turning and less to slowing it down with engine break.
Sorry, but I have to call B.S. on this statement. No explanation should be needed.
 

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While coasting the transmission gears are turning, however they are NOT getting the same amount of oil as they would when the engine is running at an rpm corresponding to the road speed of the bike. In other words, there is a reduced amount of oil going to the transmission while coasting. That said the larger issue is the lack of control over the operation of the bike. Going through corners while coasting? Bad, bad idea. The very idea of it gives me the heabie geabie's. If you want to coast, get an old Schwinn Stingray... they are pretty cool. Big buck's if you can find a nice one.
agree'd
 

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While coasting the transmission gears are turning, however they are NOT getting the same amount of oil as they would when the engine is running at an rpm corresponding to the road speed of the bike. In other words, there is a reduced amount of oil going to the transmission while coasting. That said the larger issue is the lack of control over the operation of the bike. Going through corners while coasting? Bad, bad idea. The very idea of it gives me the heabie geabie's. If you want to coast, get an old Schwinn Stingray... they are pretty cool. Big buck's if you can find a nice one.
what he said
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
As I stated before I only coast when I'm approaching a complete stop. As far as corners go, I will coast sometimes at small intersection turns where there are sharp turns where I need to slow down or the road looks sketchy. Personally, I just don't like to engine brake all day long in stop and go traffic. At the end of the day , "To each his own!"
 
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