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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi guys, I'm new to the forum. I've had the CBR for about 2 months now and have taken the MSF course. I'd like to get a bit of feedback if possible regarding street cornering and lean angles.

Is their a good formula when cornering on the back roads in regards to the posted "suggested speed"? I mean, can you usually "at least" take the corner at the suggested speed if not further on the stock IRC tires?

Also, has anyone had this bike leaned over to maximum lean (edge of the tires), and what degree of lean would you say that was? I.e. 45 degrees?

Thanks in advance for any insight you may give. I'm just wanting to get less timid in the corners and knowing that I can at least take a corner at the suggested speed would be a good place to start.
 

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Well it would all depend on the conditions of the road. and what the surface is made of. I would just go and ride till you feel comfortable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Basically clear conditions and nice smooth asphalt. I guess I'm just wondering if the suggested speed is a good starting place. I always find that I'm slowing down about 5 mph under the suggested speed for the corners out of timidity.
 

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Well it would all depend on the conditions of the road. and what the surface is made of. I would just go and ride till you feel comfortable.
Ditto.

Every road and rider are different. Here is what I would do if I was starting today. Read "Twist of the Wrist II" by Keith Code , ride a lot for the next 3 months being wary of road conditions, then do two trackdays a couple of weeks apart (if you have access to a track, trackday organization, and the cash).
 

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I also agree to just go do what you feel safe with and as you ride and get more comfortable you'll just naturally go a little faster and faster. There's no "specific formula" to tell you on how fast you can take a turn because there's way to many variables. Is the road wet, gravel, traffic, rider skill, etc.... It ALL plays a huge part. When I got my bike I was always cautious in turns and didn't lean a whole bunch but I've gotten more and more comfortable and have found that now on most turns I can take at near or double the posted turn speed(on a nice dry day). My wifewho just started riding and had zero motorcycle experience started out just going nice and slow through turns and now she's getting much more comfortable and taking turns much faster and smoother.

As far as a good place to start, yeah the posted speed is usually VERY, VERY conservative and you should be fine at that. I know I found when I first started riding that going the posted speed for the turn I barely had to even lean(maybe a couple degree's).

I'd say the maximum lean angle of these bikes is past 45 degrees because you can REALLY lay these bikes over pretty far and they just grab and go. Some of the guys like Aufitt have their tires scrubbed all the way to the very edge of the tread! That's some serious leaning! LOL
 

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Yes, a good starting place under the conditions you've outlined. With experience your questions will be answered. I'm not a particularily aggresive rider and my tires are scrubbed to the edges.
 

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Basically clear conditions and nice smooth asphalt. I guess I'm just wondering if the suggested speed is a good starting place. I always find that I'm slowing down about 5 mph under the suggested speed for the corners out of timidity.
You just have to practice it more and more to learn what your maximum lean angle is. When you're start scraping the peg, you're over all the way.

Rear sets are pegs that are mounted higher for racing. One guy on here said he was scraping the muffler. When it's perfectly dry and free of debris, the bike will go over all the way, to where the road is right in your face.

Learn to read the road surface, moisture, grit, condition, as you gain confidence, you will go faster. What do you care what the sign says? Just go the right speed for you at any given time and place.
 

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speed limit seems like a good place to start to me..i just take em how ever fast im comfortable..usually not flying around back roads anyway...just take it easy..watch out for gravel in those corners..idiots coming at you on your side of the road ..both are common occurences to me....and just go however fast ur comfortable and stay safe..

i have scraped the toe of my boot n shoe many times in corners..seemed to me there was lots of lean left to go..but im not gonna test it out...my toe scraping to me, is like a yellow flag telling me im close to my limit..helps keep me in check
 

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I've been leaning into a corner far enough to scrape the bottom of my boot a couple of times. that being said, i was only half way to the outer corner of the stock rubber. i know that the bike and tires could handle much more but the reason my boot scraped was more of an issue with the suspension being too soft in it's stock setup than me, the bike or the tires being able to handle the conditions. i believe with the bike set up properly, you and your fear factor would kick in long before the bike or tires would reach their limits.
 

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Todays sport bikes, including the CBR250R, are capable of much more cornering performance, than what the average rider is able to do with these bikes. With just the stock IRC tires, the CBR250R will corner well above posted corner speeds, assuming good clean road conditions. With a set of top shelf tires, the cornering limits are pushed even further. Still, a given bikes real world ability to corner comes down to the pilot, as well as the prevailing conditions of the road. Going easy with the lean angles when on the steep part of the learning curve is always the best practice. As pricelister said, Keith Code's book is a good text on performance riding, and some Track Day's would move you up the learning curve quickly, and more importantly... Safely. Public roads are not a good place to learn performance riding, there are just too many unknowns, and conditions which are beyond the rider's control.
 

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I guess I'll make 3 points:

1. It absolutely depends on the condition of the road. Even while I'm driving my truck, I'm evaluating the road for the next time I'm on the bike. There are areas I avoid because I know there's too much gravel or sand for me to feel comfortable.

2. There is no reason to ride outside of your comfort zone. When I started I didn't know what the bike could do in a corner and what was a safe entry speed. Start slow and push yourself consistently and confidently.

3. Those yellow signs are intended for cars and trucks. Your bike can out-maneuver just about any car and truck on the road. You just have to get the rider to the same skill level as the bike. Starting out, those signs are probably good cues for every new rider.
 

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Speed.

Those yellow signs are intended for cars and trucks. Your bike can out-maneuver just about any car and truck on the road. You just have to get the rider to the same skill level as the bike. Starting out, those signs are probably good cues for every new rider.
Those yellow signs with a MPH speed listing. Are the suggested safe speed (per DOT) for for any vehicle in the worst inclement weather conditions. To safely navigate the road, without loosing control of the vehicle.

A speed test was held at Bristol Motor Speedway. A selection of drivers and vehicles was invited to see who could post the highest Lap Speed.

One of the invited guest was a MotoGP/SBK Rider with his Personel Mount. His posted lap speed was below 150 MPH. He was ranked in the bottom 1/3 of the Posted Lap Speeds.
 

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The stock tires are good to go for new riders. I have 13,600 miles on my IRC tires (Second rear tire) and I haven't run into trouble yet. I have around one centimeter left of chicken strips and I ride in all conditions and all year.

I agree with the advice above, but I would recommend A twist of the wrist II DVD instead of the book. I bought the book first and I found it difficult to understand. It is one of those books that you learn something new each time you read a chapter, but it depends upon your experience level. The DVD was much easier for me to understand because I could actually see good riders in action.

I found the book "Total Control," by Lee Parks to be more beneficial to my initial learning. It is like the riding college 101 level verses Keith code 301.

Keith Code recommends staying at 70% of your capabilities to really learn and I agree. How are you supposed to learn something if you aren't doing it right? I don't think anyone can be perfect at 100% especially if you don't know what perfect is! My rule of thumb; If you find yourself unconsciously letting off the throttle or hitting the brakes, you are beyond 70% of your capabilities and you need to reduce your speed.

One final tip that has really helped me out is to pick one thing to work on each time you ride. I usually work on it for a month or more. That has been how long it has taken me to train my brain to do something that seems uncomfortable at first. I recommend Keith Code's two step turning point process as an excellent base upon which to build everything else. This will get you cornering consistently instead of running wide. I assume you already know about counter-steering though...
 

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Those yellow signs with a MPH speed listing. Are the suggested safe speed (per DOT) for for any vehicle in the worst inclement weather conditions. To safely navigate the road, without loosing control of the vehicle.
Actually no; those speed signs are actually there for comfort, not safety. They indicate the maximum speed a vehicle can take while staying in its lane that doesn't result in an "uncomfortable" lateral g-force for the passengers. You can typically take them safely at much higher speeds assuming you are in a well maintained vehicle that isn't sensitive to higher lateral forces (e.g. SUVs, etc.)

Be careful of outrunning your vision though. If your vision is obscured to the point that you can't stop within the distance you can see, you're going too fast for the corner. You never know when an accident, animal, stalled car, or whatever else is literally just around the corner.
 

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Also said:
jut keep pressing and rolling and it will keep leaning. I've scraped my rear sets on the pavement and I have raised rear sets. That shouldn't happen and was really bad form on my part.

this isn't even close to max lean angle and I'm only going about 40 mph right here. Not stock tires but the IRC are certainly capable of that. Look at Auffits track day picks. I second twist of the wrist II but before that I say do a track day. You will learn more in one day at the track then watching that video 200 times.
 

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^^ That is an AWESOME picture! Not only is it cool looking, it's amazingly clear. Whoever took that really knew their stuff!
 
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