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Discussion Starter #1
Question for the experts out there. I live in rural Saskatchewan and our pavement isnt the smoothest but it works. it has hills, curves, frost heaves and even the odd pot hole. I have burnt 6 tanks of fuel in bike since owning it and ive encountered the same issue twice. couldnt tell you if it was a heave that it hit or not but it has scared me now twice. When making a turn off the highway at a low speed from a stop i have dragged my kickstand. my lean wasnt very aggressive and i can from a dead stop to city speed which is 50km/hr. Is this a common problem or is it just a freak thing that can happen. I am tempted to cut off the triangle section that has drug on the pavement and shorten it so that it doesnt happen again
 

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The only way that the kick stand would drag would be with some extreme lean angles. I would check and see if the triangle piece is not bent down. If It is I would just bend it up further so it is closer to your foot peg.
 

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The only way that the kick stand would drag would be with some extreme lean angles. I would check and see if the triangle piece is not bent down. If It is I would just bend it up further so it is closer to your foot peg.
ill have a look at it in the morning when i get off work. i bought the bike used so it is a possibility that it is bent from the previous owner
 

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A couple things could contribute to that.

One major factor would be overly soft suspension for your weight. That's typical of many bikes. They are sprung too softly for a bigger (or even average) rider. Some have preload adjustments on the forks and spring that can help compensate by setting the sag correctly (usually decreasing it).

The real cure is fork springs and a shock with the correct rate for your weight and riding style. I have replaced my fork springs/oil and rear shock.

One thing to do now would be to shift your rear to the inside of the seat before turning in. That helps get your weight to the inside of the corner and reduces your lean angle. Some top street-rider coaches suggest it's mandatory to "hang-off" to increase cornering safety by not running as close to the edge of the tire. I always at least shift my rear to the inside when setting up for a corner without any excessive "hanging-off". Makes the bike want to turn better.

Also check your tire pressures and make sure they are at the upper end of the recommendation.
 

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The OP would have to be gargantuan to compress the suspension low enough to drag the kickstand. I'm 225lbs. and even with the rear shock on the softest setting I don't even come close to dragging it.
I did, however, have one low-speed drop at one point and it somehow bent the kickstand just enough that it was in danger of dragging. It was an easy fix to bend it back into the correct position, but I still wonder how that small drop managed to knock the kickstand so far out of alignment.
The OP says his is a used bike. It may well have suffered a similar drop at some point and the kickstand was never bent back into position. There might also be something under the bike or in the kickstand pivot preventing it from retracting completely.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I’m 210 so I don’t know about the suspension compression. Could be, the bike had 11,000km when I purchased it. Hasn’t done it since... must have been a Freak thing
 

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At 210, the factory suspension settings/spring rates are not going to be correct for you.

I would look closely at the stand to see if it looks to be bent in any way, and removing a tab that is the first thing to drag would be a possibility.

With a few things going on at once - overly soft suspension, tight corner, off-camber, not hanging to the inside, bump in the corner, it's possible they added-up to the bike sitting low enough that it hit.

Might not happen again, but it is something to be concerned about.

If you plan to keep the CBR for a while, I would look into springs and a shock that is set-up correctly for your size.

I'm 180# without gear, and I needed to change the suspension (fork springs and a rear shock) of my SV650 to get it set properly for me, so it's not out of the question that you would need to do the same.
 

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I'd guess there may have been some pavement issues at this location i.e. abrupt change in grade/slope. Just keep in mind these bikes have about 5.7" of ground clearance.
 

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if you are 210 cm height probably your weight is over 100 kg . which will reduce the clearance of bike from ground which will be further reduced if you have pilon at back . better to have a pic or video of the situation. inspect the kick stand if there is no deformation or bent ect probably your bike is sinking to ground too much. you will require to increase back suspension setting with the tool kit that is comes with bike.
 
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