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I just got a message from a guy on youtube in New Zealand, he had a 2011 250 and was also having the stalling while riding problems. His shop had done most of things a lot of us here went through, plug replacement, valve checks, head..and last thing his shop replaced was the entire ECU. He said when he took it back from the dealer, it was fine for around 2000 kms then started stalling while riding again. 15 times within the 2000kms

So..looks like even a new ECU won't cure it. You know, I am going to stay on these forums to see what happens with these problems..I got to know what finally fixes this.


To my knowledge this is the first guy to have the ECU replaced. Unless someone knows otherwise.
 

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I've said it before in a couple of your other threads... If I were the technician tasked with sorting out the stalling problem on your bike, I would have started with replacing (or bypassing when possible) the safety switches (clutch lever switch, side stand switch) one by one. These switches are not high tech, and can easily have an intermittent failure. I had the very same issue with the side stand switch on my '94 Honda XR650L. Compounding the issue is that it is not easy to test switches for an intermittent electrical problem. I've found that "the process of elimination" method works best for these types of problems.
 

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Personally I havent experienced the stall on downshift and Ive tried. Ive dropped to clutch in a gear down to lock the rear wheel and drift a corner with no hiccups from the bike.

Now the stall upon start up Ive had happen. It doesnt worry me because the mapping in the ecu is more to the lean side to increase the MPG's and it happens during the open loop cycle (cold start). I cant remember the temperature O2's start to read at but untill the sensor hits temp, the bike will use its open loop cycle.
 

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That's me.
Scared the **** out of me the other day.
So, everybody and his dog has this problem and ten years later, we still don't know?
Probably because it's not happening enough to become a "known issue" with the CBR250.
The CBR250 is ridiculously reliable, so any problem like this discussed to death if more than a few people experience it.
Only 7 posts in this thread in 10 years suggests the problem is bike specific and not model specific, so unless the OP miraculously returns and posts his solution, we may never know the cause. :confused:
 

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Probably because it's not happening enough to become a "known issue" with the CBR250.
The CBR250 is ridiculously reliable, so any problem like this discussed to death if more than a few people experience it.
Only 7 posts in this thread in 10 years suggests the problem is bike specific and not model specific, so unless the OP miraculously returns and posts his solution, we may never know the cause. :confused:
mmm...OK, so maybe for the record? This is what happened to me at least a couple of times (stall engine). And it may be a fault that is typical for those who switch from a relaxed 125cc engine that likes low rpm and based on torque, to a sporty 250cc engine that likes high rpm and based on power. And maybe it might be typical for beginner riders as well. In the case that happened to me, I slowed down, I was probably riding in the 3000 rpm area, and when I continued to brake, I engaged the clutch too late. It also happened to me while starting to move, when I released the clutch at too low rpm.
 

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mmm...OK, so maybe for the record? This is what happened to me at least a couple of times (stall engine). And it may be a fault that is typical for those who switch from a relaxed 125cc engine that likes low rpm and based on torque, to a sporty 250cc engine that likes high rpm and based on power. And maybe it might be typical for beginner riders as well.
That is also me.

Truth be told, there is a lengthy thread on xBHP and several YouTube videos, just google "CBR250R stall".
This reddit thread also blames it on the ECU (and poor technique).

I expect a Honda bike to be a workhorse and I don't doubt the '250, in general, is.
However this seems to be the Achilles heel of the breed (reported by just a bunch of people, sure, but the most reported, which is a testament to how solid the bike is in general).

I do find it mildly worrying in one respect: pulling the clutch and braking is what you often do in an emergency maneuver.
The next thing you do is usually having to get the hell out, which is... ehr, impractical with a stalled engine.

EDIT: NHTSA took notice, too... https://static.nhtsa.gov/odi/inv/2014/INOA-PE14032-2737.PDF
 

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Also... only seven posts in this thread, but...


:-D
 

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Also... only seven posts in this thread, but...
OK, but calling it a problem with the motorcycle is wrong, the problem is with the rider, here's another explanation (It's from the link you left us above:)):
The problem is that the engine is so quiet at idle that its difficult to hear/feel in traffic especially if you are still moving
 
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OK, but calling it a problem with the motorcycle is wrong, the problem is with the rider
I can't really agree there.
An engine idling without load should normally not stall, in general.
Much less when load is removed from it!

I agree that coasting is a bad idea and something riders should as a rule avoid, but stalling on neutral is kind of a biggie for the bike.

It would be not-so-bad on a track, but, in real life traffic it can take power away from you in the middle of an emergency maneuver (those are often not very elegant and proper).
That's the last thing you want on a bike.

Newer Ducati Multistrada also do that, and it did not go down well with the Ducati people :) Engine stall while coasting at low speed (MTS 1200S DVT 2016

Interesting tidibit from that thread:

I do not believe there is an inherent problem with the ECU. You can find these kinds of complaints on virtually any thread for a motor vehicle because the ECU gets blamed when the problem is not understood. More than likely, there are multiple causes for the different complainants. I attempted to provide common issues in my first post.
Gives reason for hope and/or despair 😀
 

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stalling on neutral is kind of a biggie for the bike.
Yes, this can be a problem. No, this doesn't have to be a big problem. In the CBR250R there is no special problem around this issue (stalling on neutral).
in real life traffic it can take power away from you in the middle of an emergency maneuver
In real life, while riding, you don't downshift 1/2 gear(to neutral) when you shifting from second gear to first gear. I don't know a rider who put into neutral gear while riding. Maybe beginner riders? And of course you shouldn't do that ("it can take power away from you ...").

But you already know that.
 

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In real life, while riding, you don't downshift 1/2 gear(to neutral) when you shifting from second gear to first gear. I don't know a rider who put into neutral gear while riding.
No, but you can pull the clutch to the same effect when emergency braking, triggering the stall.
You might need the power immediately after...
 

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No, but you can pull the clutch to the same effect when emergency braking, triggering the stall.
You might need the power immediately after...
Not all riders have the skill for perfect practice in an emergency situation, it would be correct to say that most of us don't, I don't.
The argument here goes from the motorcycle's abilities to the rider's abilities, and that's fine, the CBR250R doesn't lack abilities, most riders do.
It happens many times in emergency brakes (and of course we all should try to avoid getting into such situations), when the goal is a complete stop, then it can happen, that the engine stall (because you didn't press the clutch lever at all, because the reflex is to hold the handlebars tightly). You can train to improve the correct reflexes and then the response in emergency situations will be more accurate, such a training is even highly recommended, it improves our abilities, it did not turn us to be Valentino Rossi.
I don't use my abdominal muscles and leg muscles like a professional rider do, etc...
 

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I agree with Tamir. You can certainly induce a stall on any motorcycle if you're not paying attention. If you carefully research all the available info on the subject, I'd wager that many of the incidents are simply improper operation.
 

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Is this guy riding poorly?


Yes.
But should the bike die like that?
I honestly don't think so.

I'd wager it's actually a combination of many factors: tired battery, dirty throttle body, spark plug past its prime, poor technique and the ECU injecting some really lean **** in that chamber.

I'd be ready to bet that after either a thorough clean up and servicing of the engine (or - hypothetically - replacement of the ECU with a more aggressive one) it won't happen again.

Keep you posted.
 

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Is this guy riding poorly?

LINK to Youtube

Yes.
But should the bike die like that?
I honestly don't think so.

I'd wager it's actually a combination of many factors: tired battery, dirty throttle body, spark plug past its prime, poor technique and the ECU injecting some really lean **** in that chamber.

I'd be ready to bet that after either a thorough clean up and servicing of the engine (or - hypothetically - replacement of the ECU with a more aggressive one) it won't happen again.

Keep you posted.
The problem is the rider's and not the motorcycle's, you don't press the clutch lever at a speed of 70 km/h, in 6th gear, and leave it pressed until to a complete stop. When you slow down, you have to downshift, which is also a matter of safety. The test the guy is doing has nothing to do with reality. In the 6th gear,when clutch in, the load created on the engine by the transmission and the clutch basket is more than the engine is able to take when the throttle is closed. This problem does not exist in first gear, but in sixth gear it can happen, especially at neglected engines whose performance is below the specification. Who presses the clutch 500 meters before an intersection and stays in sixth gear all the way till stopping? When it comes to a small displacement engine with low torque, it can happens, there is no surprise here, there is a rider here that checking what? It's like checking that the water is wet. But you already know that.
 
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Who presses the clutch 500 meters before an intersection and stays in sixth gear all the way till stopping?
A bad rider.

But consider this: you pull the clutch before the intersection, release the throttle, rapidly change gears, blip the throttle slightly to rev-match, slowly release the clutch and wait for compression to engage and... oh, what's that... your engine stalled and bike's slowing down much faster than expected.

You'll agree there's nothing remotely wrong with that procedure, which happens in about 2 seconds or 3 if you're lazy or paying attention to something else.
Can take less if you're an experienced rider and/or you hate your clutch.

Now, that happened to me, no biggie, just releasing the clutch made it restart 9 times out of 10, but it distracted me, and that's dangerous, as is the resulting jerky motion if you're followed closely by an TikTok idiot.

Anyway, JFYI: gave a thorough cleaning to the throttle body (it was full of soot and crap), changed the air filter (ditto), replaced the supposedly "fresh" oil with quality Castrol stuff, added some fuel cleaner to my next tank and... the bike doesn't do that anymore, at least while riding like a normal person.

Previous owner wasn't big on maintenance, it seems.
 
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