Honda CBR 250 Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is my first year with a bike and have had a limited budget so I’ve not been able to get a stand for the bike to help with maintenance so I’ve had to do it a little ghetto. I got the chain from rusted to looking good just rolling the bike and scrubbing with copper brushes, nylon brushes, and WD 40 on the small area of the chain exposed - rotating the chain as I go along. I’ll post before and after photos and I’m wondering if the chain was too bad to begin with or fine. Also I cleaned the paint and waxed it and cleaned all the engine and underneath the bike from the outside as best as I could. The only thing left is pump up the tires before storing in the shed. What do you guys suggest the tires be pumped too for storage to prevent bald spots? And I also have the battery out on a battery tender once a week. We don’t have a garage and I’ve read that the cbr batteries are ok so store inside, use on a tender and won’t be toxic. I’ve also read that you shouldn’t charge them or store them inside but with it not being recommended to keep outside in the winter I don’t know what to do exactly besides ask my parents if I can store it in their garage. Any suggestions?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
228 Posts
Fill the fuel tank with regular non methanol gas and a dash of fuel stabilizer, run it to circulate the new gas if you didn't ride it back from the fuel station.

Ideally you want a paddock stand both ends so the tires don't rest on a cold floor in the same spot.

Your should have waxed the chain after cleaning it with WD40.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,825 Posts
There are a few other things that you should do.

As suggested, add a fuel stabilizer and fill the tank up with gas. 87 without ethanol is your best choice if available. Ethanol contains and holds moisture, so avoid it if possible - especially in a steel gas tank during storage. Run the engine enough to get the stabilized gas into the injector.

It's always best to change the oil and filter before storing. After changing, start the engine and run it for 30 seconds - then don't start it again until you are ready to ride it.

If it's stored in a non-heated environment, be sure to check the freeze point of the coolant. If it's not adequate all sorts of real bad things can happen...

I always run my tires up to about 40 psi for storage. They will lose pressure from the temp drop, and you don't want the sidewalls to bend and crack from low pressure. I have stands, but current tires aren't going to "flatspot" like they did in the old days - so don't sweat it.

Store the battery in a warm spot and charge it occasionally.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I have filled it up with 91 octane ethanol free gas since this is the only ethanol free gas available near me. I added stabil and went on a 45 minute ride before shutting it down finally. I got an oil change 300 miles ago just before the end of the season and used a chain lubricant protector. 40 psi you say? Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,825 Posts
How do you check the freeze point on the coolant
You need an inexpensive antifreeze tester from an auto parts store.

Since you rode a while I would top-off the tank. Any air space increases the chances of condensation forming.

If there is a chance of rodents coming in contact with the cycle during storage I would block off the intake snorkel and exhaust pipe opening. They love to live and store food in the airbox over the winter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,304 Posts
If there is a chance of rodents coming in contact with the cycle during storage I would block off the intake snorkel and exhaust pipe opening. They love to live and store food in the airbox over the winter.
+1 on this /\
Mice just love CBR250R airboxes. If you're storing your bike outside you may as just hang a "mice welcome" sign on it. I finally fitted my airbox snorkel with wire mesh to keep them out permanently, but blocking the airbox opening with a wad of steel wool will also work to keep them out in a pinch. Just don't forget to remove it in the spring before you start the bike for the first time.
If there's ANY chance you have mice in your area do not skip this step. I still check my bike every few days even though it's pretty well mouse-proofed. Those buggers can set up house in you bike in no time at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Is there a way to check and see if there is already one in there before I seal off the holes? What should I use I use to block off the entrances
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,304 Posts
Take the seat off and the airbox opening is readily apparent under the rear of the gas tank. You can also remove the air filter door (it's just a tab that snaps to remove) and pull out the filter to check the inside of the airbox completely (and check the condition of your air filter while you're at it.)
The airbox "snorkel" opening is oval and not that large, maybe 3-4". You can easily cut and bend a piece of hardware cloth (wire mesh) around the opening and secure it with a large zip tie to keep any critters out of there.
For the muffler opening I just slip a plastic bag over the end and secure it with a rubber band, mostly to keep moisture out as I've never had a mouse invade my exhaust as yet. And if they did the damage to the plastic bag would be pretty obvious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I just finished plugging the snorkel with steel wool and I also removed the air filter door and checked the entire air box thoroughly. I also put a plastic bag over the muffler and I will check it periodically for nice invasion. I just want to say thank you for the very helpful insite on this topic I would have never thought about it and there is nothing else on google or YouTube about this topic directly with cbr 250rs. I appreciate the help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,304 Posts
You're welcome!
Just make sure you DO check the bike periodically. Even with the airbox plugged mice will still build a nest under the seats if given the chance. One year I got a little complacent and even though everything was plugged I didn't check it for a couple of weeks. Mice had not only built a nest under my passenger seat, but they had gnawed a hole in the vinyl case that holds my tire plugging kit that I store under there. Now I make sure to also throw a packet of "Mouse Magic" repellent under the seats to keep them away completely and I set traps and bait stations around the bike just in case. It's a constant battle.

Mouse Magic® - Bonide
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top