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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi fellow CBR rider’s,

I bought a 2012 CBR250R last and am headed to a big track and want to be safe. I have a new Dainese leather suit and all the gear for protecting myself. My bike came from the original owner, has 6000 miles and hasn’t been damaged In any significant way. Only changes in the bike is it is sporting Michelin Pilot Street Radials.

I’m all about becoming a more skilled rider.

I have already done a couple track schools on a one mile 18 turn small track with ZARS at DCTC. Now I am headed up to ZARS day at Brainerd International Raceway in Minnesota at the end of June 2021. I have 1969 BWM 2002 with a 89 E30 M3 motor that I did track schools with in California and am not too worried about the scene-mostly the CBR250R.

I don’t think I need to do anything to the bike to be prepared beyond the standard tire pressure, chain, change type of maintenance, but am curious the checks anyone else might feel necessary to have a safe bike. I’m 6’3” 190, 45 years old. I have a sound knowledge of the physics of 4 wheel track time, not so much 2 wheel. I do my own maintenance for the most part.

Any hints or tips before the big day for a safe CBR250R??

Good to finally post and be able to read things on this forum over the last year, thanks everyone.

Mark
 

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Hi Mark and welcome to the forum.
I've never done track days so i couldn't really tell you how to prepare for them but I can tell you that the Pilot Street radials are good touring tires but they are not meant for racing or giving you the last ounce of grip. You should also check how old they are as the grip decreases once the tires are 5 or more years old.
Another thing I would check would be the brake pads and all fluids.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the welcome and checks.

All fluids are good, brakes are good for wear, the OEM carbon type. Tires are new this year. I get the compromise on the tires. I could of gone more extreme, but at certain costs-whether wet weather, tire life or $$. I was happy enough on the smaller trackwith the Michelin’s. Still more bike than I am rider.

If this turns into something more next year, maybe I will move up to second set of track wheels or a 2018+ Ninja 400/duke 390 or something.
 

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You will immediately notice the soft stock suspension once you hit the track.

Proper-rate fork springs and fork oil are a good start. A better rear shock is a bit more difficult and expensive to source.

See if you can find articles by Ari Henning (Cycle World or Motorcyclist) on his CBR250R track bike. He got it pretty dialed-in, and may have some good set-up tips
 

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I guess I'd also suggest a high quality synthetic oil as well.

The CBR doesn't hold that much, so a good quality oil is important - especially on the track. Probably check it before each session, just to be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You will immediately notice the soft stock suspension once you hit the track.

Proper-rate fork springs and fork oil are a good start. A better rear shock is a bit more difficult and expensive to source.

See if you can find articles by Ari Henning (Cycle World or Motorcyclist) on his CBR250R track bike. He got it pretty dialed-in, and may have some good set-up tips
I have definitely noticed the soft spring and oil when under hard braking.
You will immediately notice the soft stock suspension once you hit the track.

Proper-rate fork springs and fork oil are a good start. A better rear shock is a bit more difficult and expensive to source.

See if you can find articles by Ari Henning (Cycle World or Motorcyclist) on his CBR250R track bike. He got it pretty dialed-in, and may have some good set-up tips
Too soft in the front for the a track in a lot of ways. I can recognize that and others when I rode the short tight track days. 😆 I don’t plan on changing that at the moment though.
 

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I like your goal of becoming better rider. Ignore lap-times and work on developing your skills. Having camera on rear of bike facing forwards will help review your technique.

I recommend staying with street tyres for first 2-years. They're only about 5-sec/lap slower than all-out racing slicks, but have much, much more forgiving behavior at limit. Sliding street tyres at limit will teach you tonnes about bike-control. Using sticky tyres, even DOT R-compound tyres will slow your development because they'll grip great up to their limit, but next thing you know, you're sliding on your ass with no warning! When you can comfortably slide both tyres out of corners while maintaining control and not break sweat, you're ready to move up to stickier ones. :)

Don't spend too much money in race parts, use it for trackdays instead. Will make much bigger difference in long-run. I did 42 track days with 7 race-weekends my 1st season. My Ninja 250 was pretty much bone-stock with just upgraded fork-springs and oil for my weight. I chopped off 35-sec/lap @ Thunderhill that 1st season on street tyres.

Went with sticker street tyres my 2nd season and chopped off 10-sec/lap more. My 3rd season I used R-compound street tyres (Alpha 13-SP) and took off another 5-sec.

Many people start off with too-sticky tyres and never learn to ride at limit safely. End up crashing way more than necessary. "Don't know what happened, tyres just slid out!", is common complaint. Stay with street tyres for now until you can control them at limit.
 

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Another thing is brakes.

Make sure you've got fresh DOT-4 fluid in system. Change yearly during off-season.

I also prefer brake pads that don't fade such as Galfer HH sintered ceramic compound.
 

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Hey mate,

I went to Albacete (a track in the centre of Spain) last march, and I did some improvements on the bike:

  • New fluids: engine oil, coolant, brake fluid...
  • New brake pads: I put the EBC HH; the older pads were wear out.
  • New tyres: Bridgestone's S22 instead of Michelin's Street Radial. The reason why is because Michelins were too old and didn't give me enough confidence to ride fast with them (more than 5 years and about 30.000km).
  • New fork oil: not because of the track day, just because of I hadn't done yet in the 4 years of ownership (and I guess that the first owner didn't touch them as well).

With all that stuff the bike went pretty good, I took the chance of going to the track to do de maintenance and put it as good as my wallet could pay. In my opinion, if you keep your bike good (I mean, maintenance, tyres...) you don't need to make a big effort to put it ready to a track day.
 

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Honda: INNOVA125i(2010); CBR250R(2013)
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New brake pads: I put the EBC HH
I am currently in the process of "first" maintenance after buying second hand CBR250RD(2013), and have replaced the items you mentioned: Oil MOTUL5000 10W-40, Coolant SINTEK EURO G11, Fork Oil LIQU-IMOLY 10W medium, F.Tyre IRC RX-01...
Except for a rear tire, which is in a very good condition.
When I ordered the brake pads I put the emphasis on the budget (and buy a "Brenta" pads). I am not a sporty rider so I thought it was unnecessary for me to pay for an upgraded component. I did not go into the differences GG Vs HH ... now I am, and I share. It turns out that for normal use the GG is better not only in terms of budget.
Brake pads HH vs GG (WEMOTO):
  • HH Pads These have the highest coefficient of Friction and are ideal for high-performance motorcycles and race track use.
  • GG Pads This grade of Pad is a great all rounder and will perform well in most conditions.
  • Mixing HH and GG Pads Many manufacturers specify HH for the front of performance Motorcycles with GG in the rear.
 

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2012 Honda CBR 250R
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I am currently in the process of "first" maintenance after buying second hand CBR250RD(2013), and have replaced the items you mentioned: Oil MOTUL5000 10W-40, Coolant SINTEK EURO G11, Fork Oil LIQU-IMOLY 10W medium, F.Tyre IRC RX-01...
Except for a rear tire, which is in a very good condition.
When I ordered the brake pads I put the emphasis on the budget (and buy a "Brenta" pads). I am not a sporty rider so I thought it was unnecessary for me to pay for an upgraded component. I did not go into the differences GG Vs HH ... now I am, and I share. It turns out that for normal use the GG is better not only in terms of budget.
Brake pads HH vs GG (WEMOTO):
  • HH Pads These have the highest coefficient of Friction and are ideal for high-performance motorcycles and race track use.
  • GG Pads This grade of Pad is a great all rounder and will perform well in most conditions.
  • Mixing HH and GG Pads Many manufacturers specify HH for the front of performance Motorcycles with GG in the rear.
To be honest I have no idea about which brake pads are better, the only thing I can say is that in terms of performance, OEM brake pads have almost the same performance as the EBC HH (don't know if OEM pads are GG or HH). I bought the EBCs because I realized that my brake pads were died three days before the trackday, and they were the only ones with 24 hours delivery 🤣
 
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