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Does anyone have any issues driving freeways?

-Getting up to speed?
-Accelerating Quickly When at about 70mph?
-Back or Hand Pain?
-Etc?

Only reason i ask is i was reading a few reviews online of the Cbr, and they all seem to claim the Cbr is better for city riding and shouldnt be used often for freeways because when you hit about 70mph, its difficult to accelerate quickly from there and if for some reason you need to accelerate quick to dodge a cager or something your pretty much screwed.

you guys being cbr riders tell me your experiences and how true this statement is, if at all? I want a Cbr over a ninja for SURE but i do 90% freeway riding because i live in San Diego and you cant get anywhere without 30 mins of freeway time one way. Plus from time to time i drive up to temecula to see my family (an hour away) and i dont want a commuter bike if im gonna be having Hunchback problems lmao!

thanks guys!
 

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Getting up to speed is surprisingly quick. You're not going to get any huge bursts of power or speed upwards of 70, but you still have a good bit left to go. I haven't had any problems with it and I wouldn't worry about if I were you.
 

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Bike is more comfy than ninja. If your cruising up to temecula on 15 its gonna be slow pulling on way up. But you will scoot back to SD. Its true anything above 75 is pretty slow moving esp going up hill. Its a 250. And that highway is fast moving. However i ride mine 60 miles a day on one of the most dangerous highways and have no issues dodging cagers. I dont dodge them with spped though. I use SEE and lane positioning.
Ive had the bike to 94 tucked down a slope. And dyno confirmed my speedo is on the money. Topped out at 102 on the dyno. You will miss the hp on freeway. Even on a ninja. Step up if u wanna go fast imho. But the bike has no issue doing 75.
 

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Does anyone have any issues driving freeways?

-Getting up to speed?
-Accelerating Quickly When at about 70mph?
-Back or Hand Pain?
-Etc?

Only reason i ask is i was reading a few reviews online of the Cbr, and they all seem to claim the Cbr is better for city riding and shouldnt be used often for freeways because when you hit about 70mph, its difficult to accelerate quickly from there and if for some reason you need to accelerate quick to dodge a cager or something your pretty much screwed.

you guys being cbr riders tell me your experiences and how true this statement is, if at all? I want a Cbr over a ninja for SURE but i do 90% freeway riding because i live in San Diego and you cant get anywhere without 30 mins of freeway time one way. Plus from time to time i drive up to temecula to see my family (an hour away) and i dont want a commuter bike if im gonna be having Hunchback problems lmao!

thanks guys!
I find the bike performs quite well on the Freeway (at least to my standards). I could be wrong, but I would guess from 70mph in 6th it might have better roll-on than the Ninja 250 at the same speed/gear (obviously the Ninja would pull away at a lower gear/higher RPM). The CBR itself seems quite comfortable/refined/composed at highway speeds. True that it won't rocket away from 'danger' effortlessly like a VTR1000, but it's not gutless either really. A good riders course/training is your best defense anyway.

However, in terms of comfort, I do find the riding position takes its toll on my back when on the bike for > 1.5 hours. Positioning myself further back on the seat seems to help some in this regard (Ideally, I'd like to lower the clip-ons at least an inch, but this doesn't appear possible without lowering the entire front end down the fork, which would destabilize things).
 

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Can I ask which kind of experience do you have in riding bikes?
You always have to consider the potential of the bike you are talking about.

The CBR250 get up to speed surprisingly quick, says kgav.
But why surprisingly?
Because it's a 250, and has (only)26hp.

It is definitely enough to ride comfortably, on city roads and on the freeways.
But if you think quite every other bigger bike has the double of the hp, where not 4 times...
consider it.
I chose the cbr and I chose well, I say so just for you not to get disappointed.
 

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A commuter bike is exactly what the CBR250R is.....I have been on I81/I40 and had no problems at all the 60 miles I rode on it at around 82 mph....if you want to accelerate and zip around traffic 20mph faster and your already doin 70..the cbr probably isnt going to put a smile on your face while trying it.

as far as hunchbacked?....i have not had any back aches or pains and have been in the saddle for about 7 straight hours at one time...seems to me that having to lay more over the handlebars like on a ninja would cause more problems concerning that than the more upright riding position of the CBR..maybe i am wrong..never had a ninja so i am just speculating

Hand pain?...i have had none but...... i did and still do have problems with my hands going numb..seems to worsen when i wear my riding gloves (grip tighter without realizing it?)......it doesnt seem to be as prevalent as it once was...maybe i am subconsciously altering my riding style or maybe my hands are starting to get trained to not get so numb so often after almost 3,000 on the odometer.
 

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I live in a town in which every where I go I have to ride highway speeds, and deal with wind almost every day. I do not find this a problem, daunting or intimidating. The 250 meets and exceeds my needs and is quite comfortable. If I'm riding for the day I have always made it my custom to stop every hour and a half for a 30 min rest break. The bike is snappy, no problem in passing and as a previous poster commented, your riding experience plays a part. Know the bike your buying. I'm enjoying this bike and having loads of fun, puts a smile on my face every time.:D
 

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Dart

I commute 40 miles each way. 30 miles is highway at 70 mph. 3,600 miles so far and still counting even in 3C temps and rain. The CBR250R is a dart. Excellent aerodynamics. Side wind gusts cause the bike to steer into the wind so the nose stays straight on track as the wheels move in and out with the winds. I lay on the tank. Excellent ergonomics. Very comfortable. You don't even get wet in the rain in that position and peeking out just over the windscreen you will find a magic window where the is no rain on your visor. Less vibration than a twin. 87 mpg US lifetime. My Ninja 250 gets 66. Rear seat/ grab bars are great for any bag or rack. Beautiful styling. No money down financing. Love it.
 

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(Ideally, I'd like to lower the clip-ons at least an inch, but this doesn't appear possible without lowering the entire front end down the fork, which would destabilize things).
I believe there are clip ons available for this bike that lower it about an inch with no modifications.
 

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I use mine for around town and on back roads. On the highway I feel like im working the hell out of it. Im sure it will take it for a vary long time but I also have a Yamaha 600 and a yamaha FJR 1300. And they handle the big road much better
 

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I'm riding the freeways of Southern California as well. My daily trip puts me on the 5 and 405 in the carpool lane where speeds run from 60-80+ depending on traffic. Granted I have not had the bike a long time but she gets up to speed just fine. With gear and backpack I probably weigh about 190.

I bought the CBR primarily for commuting and it's working out perfectly for me. Don't regret my decision one bit. As HoPMiX mentioned, those hills riding into Temecula may slow you down a bit in 6th but drop it into 5th and you should have no problem maintaining your speed. Going down your gonna fly.. :)
 

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Earwig,

I agree with the follow-up responses to your post - there's good information and suggestions here.

To be honest - it really irks me when I read the "It's difficult to accelerate quickly if for some reason you need to accelerate quick to dodge a cager" line from reviewers. That line keeps re-appearing time and time again - like some kind of mantra. It never dies - it has taken on a life of its own. It is like motorcycle journalists believe they have only one option when encountering potentially dangerous situations on the highway - accelerate like mad. Like there are no other options. Have these riders never heard of braking? Trust me - it is a good option and works well to help prevent a collision. Swerving works well too - and the CBR250R handles incredibly well. Also brakes remarkably well. Even better - plan ahead so you reduce the likelihood that you suddenly find yourself in such an unfortunate circumstance.

If you really have exhausted all your options as a motorcyclist to the point where you need to suddenly accelerate like you are being violently pulled by Cedar Point's Top Thrill Dragster's linear induction magnets - you have likely already made a number of mistakes as a rider.

I wonder if these reviewers are just nit-picking - just trying desperately to sound critical and simply need to create a problem that doesn't exist. And then perpetuate this myth from what they've read from other reviewers. Really. I wonder what the base-rates are for collisions that involved a motorcycle that couldn't accelerate fast enough to avoid a collision. Let's be serious here. I have owned a series of Honda Civics since the mid 80s - and I can honestly say that I have never had to accelerate hard from 70 mph to avoid a collision with another vehicle. Most cars can't anyway. Granted - I acknowledge that my evidence is purely anecdotal - I have no hard data regarding such statistics. I'm just surprised I don't hear similar criticisms of massive cruiser bikes that handle like $hit. I bet they are more likely to experience collisions with cagers due to excessive weight, poor handling, and poor braking - than not being able to accelerate fast enough beyond 70 mph. Yet you never hear this criticism leveled at them by motorcycle journalists. I wonder why?

Mike
 

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Earwig,

To be honest - it really irks me when I read the "It's difficult to accelerate quickly if for some reason you need to accelerate quick to dodge a cager" line from reviewers. That line keeps re-appearing time and time again - like some kind of mantra. It never dies - it has taken on a life of its own. It is like motorcycle journalists believe they have only one option when encountering potentially dangerous situations on the highway - accelerate like mad. Like there are no other options. Have these riders never heard of braking? Trust me - it is a good option and works well to help prevent a collision. Swerving works well too - and the CBR250R handles incredibly well. Also brakes remarkably well. Even better - plan ahead so you reduce the likelihood that you suddenly find yourself in such an unfortunate circumstance.

If you really have exhausted all your options as a motorcyclist to the point where you need to suddenly accelerate like you are being violently pulled by Cedar Point's Top Thrill Dragster's linear induction magnets - you have likely already made a number of mistakes as a rider.


Mike
+1.
 

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Does anyone have any issues driving freeways?

-Getting up to speed?
-Accelerating Quickly When at about 70mph?
-Back or Hand Pain?
-Etc?

Only reason i ask is i was reading a few reviews online of the Cbr, and they all seem to claim the Cbr is better for city riding and shouldnt be used often for freeways because when you hit about 70mph, its difficult to accelerate quickly from there and if for some reason you need to accelerate quick to dodge a cager or something your pretty much screwed.

you guys being cbr riders tell me your experiences and how true this statement is, if at all? I want a Cbr over a ninja for SURE but i do 90% freeway riding because i live in San Diego and you cant get anywhere without 30 mins of freeway time one way. Plus from time to time i drive up to temecula to see my family (an hour away) and i dont want a commuter bike if im gonna be having Hunchback problems lmao!

thanks guys!
I've put 8,000KM on my 250R; most of it freeway riding here in Japan where the speed limit is 80KPH. If you plan to be doing a lot of freeway riding in the US, and need good 'roll-on performance' (as the accel from 70MPH is referred to), DON'T get a 250R. This is a 250cc bike we are talking about.
Better to use the same amount of money and get a used 600cc, or a large bore twin, etc. for the US freeway environment.
To give you an example, when I lived in LA, I used a preowned Suzuki Katana 600, and it was perfect.

I love my 250 for urban commuting and the slow freeways here in Japan, but I would not buy one for the US freeway environment IMO.
 

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Earwig,

I agree with the follow-up responses to your post - there's good information and suggestions here.

Me too

"It's difficult to accelerate quickly if for some reason you need to accelerate quick to dodge a cager" line from reviewers. That line keeps re-appearing time and time again - like some kind of mantra. It never dies - it has taken on a life of its own.

Another trying to sound macho thing, methinks.

The only times I can recall having to accelerate to "dodge a cager" is when I was with an ex-girlfriend, who found it amusing to flip the bird at drivers who irritated her. Some clearly took offence.... uh oh, let's get outta here

other options. Have these riders never heard of braking? Trust me - it is a good option and works well to help prevent a collision.

Seldom, if ever my first course of action.

Swerving works well

By far the preferred choice, in my opinion

plan ahead so you reduce the likelihood that you suddenly find yourself in such an unfortunate circumstance

Do that, and keep the plan updated.
Constantly scan to be aware of what is going on around you, and the options you have. If things do get a bit awkward, look where you want to go, not at what you want to avoid.
 

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Does anyone have any issues driving freeways?

-Getting up to speed?
-Accelerating Quickly When at about 70mph?
-Back or Hand Pain?
-Etc?

Only reason i ask is i was reading a few reviews online of the Cbr, and they all seem to claim the Cbr is better for city riding and shouldnt be used often for freeways because when you hit about 70mph, its difficult to accelerate quickly from there and if for some reason you need to accelerate quick to dodge a cager or something your pretty much screwed.

you guys being cbr riders tell me your experiences and how true this statement is, if at all? I want a Cbr over a ninja for SURE but i do 90% freeway riding because i live in San Diego and you cant get anywhere without 30 mins of freeway time one way. Plus from time to time i drive up to temecula to see my family (an hour away) and i dont want a commuter bike if im gonna be having Hunchback problems lmao!

thanks guys!
What a load of bollocks.. tell whoever wrote that review to do a rider training course.

and to HTFU about the 'sore hand' lol , Mebbe their hand is on it a bit much.

Its got the lightest throttle and controls of any bike built ever.
 

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I had a Honda Shadow 700, a CBR600RR and a Yamaha Stryker 1300 before I got the 250 for the wife to play along... well, I've ridden it more than she has, and I'll say this: it is adequate at best for So Cal freeways. Maybe I'm just a fat slob compared to you guys, but here in the Mojave desert the wind puts a big hurt on this bike really fast for me. Sometimes its hard to get it up past 65mph at all in a steady headwind, much less quickly.

I'm also not terribly impressed with the brakes - I actually blew through a stopsign once when I first got the bike because I waited too long to slow down, and when I put on the clamps the stopping power I expected just wasn't there. My fault for riding it like it was more than it is, obviously, but I did expect more out of it.

However, there's plenty of good to go along with it. If you can enjoy a mild, relaxed pace, this bike is perfect. It's very comfortable, super easy to ride at low speeds. The above posters are right on about one thing: 99.99% of the time, rocketing out of trouble at high speeds isn't the answer anyway. It sure is fun, though.
 

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Strong front

I'm also not terribly impressed with the brakes
You must rely on the rear brakes quite a bit. My front brake will stand the bike on it's nose with two fingers and the front tire sticks like glue even in the rain. The rear brake is very weak due to the balance being set for safety with the combined braking system even on non ABS bikes and is used mainly for hill holding on take offs.
 

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You must rely on the rear brakes quite a bit. My front brake will stand the bike on it's nose with two fingers and the front tire sticks like glue even in the rain. The rear brake is very weak due to the balance being set for safety with the combined braking system even on non ABS bikes and is used mainly for hill holding on take offs.
Same here. My front brake is touchy to say the least or it could be the front suspension being a little soft.
 
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