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So, I live in Greenville, SC. Wanted to deposit a check in the bank ATM before midnight, so I decided to test out a ride in the cold. It was 30 degrees, wind chill of about 25. Here's what I was wearing:

Top: Fitted t-shirt, Champion thin performance layer, Starter fleece jacket, and my lined Joe Rocket riding jacket...w a Freeze Out thermal head and neck cover, Bilt armored bike gloves, full-sized Bilt riding boots, and of course the Speed and Strength full-sized helmet.

Bottom: Nike running tights, Tek Gear (Kohl's brand) thick thermal running tights, socks, and a pair of jeans.

I never went above 50...kept it around 40, and....so I'm wondering...

How else can you keep from freez'n yo ass off? lolol

I'm the kind of guy that's fine w wearing shorts when it's in the 40s-50s. That wind riding at cold temps is no joke, but I have every intention of commuting for work this winter on the CBR. Just thicker layers? Even my hands were cold! It was only a 10-15 minute drive SMH.

One other question. Do you guys notice the transmission is always hotter than the engine? Just curious. I know both get hot. With me changing my gearing, maybe I'm just a little paranoid lol. Thanks-
 

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At least for me, there comes a point when it is just too cold...I am probably not as hardcore as some but with temps under 40 degrees, I feel freezing no matter how many clothes I am wearing.

I have ridden in weather down to about 38 degrees 30 minutes each way to work riding about 70mph and it is NOT fun. If you insist on riding during the winter months, I would wear full thermals, several layers of clothing (undershirt, t shirt and a heavy sweatshirt or sweater over it) a heavy leather jacket with a good liner, a good set of heavy winter gloves with liners and a good ski mask with full helmet that doesnt leak air. I would probably even wear a winter hat over your ski mask if your helmet allows it. Dont forget about the socks too, find a good pair of heavy wool socks to put over your regular socks and wear heavy boots (wind will blow right through sneakers) Take a rubber band and put them around the lowest part of your jeans so the cold air does not blow up your pant legs. This may sound silly but believe me, you will need it. I would even venture to say wear a full snow suit if you have one. Even with all this gear, you are still going to get cold pretty quickly...your body heat simply cant overcome the frigid air blowing all over you...The tolerance for the cold probably varies though from person to person. I could probably ride 5-10 minutes in that kind of cold but 30 minutes each way is a bit too painful

You could invest in heated clothing but the electrical system in these bikes cannot handle much draw...

As far as the transmission temp, it shares the same oil as the engine so I THINK just keep an eye on the engine temps...you should be fine.
 

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Helmet vents closed, wool scarf wrapped around neck and into helmet bottom, leather Thinsulate gauntlet style gloves, t-shirt with Scorpion Hellion jacket with closed vents and thermal liner zipped in, Artix ski/snow pants over jeans, and mid-calf waterproof boots keep all the wind out. I ride all winter, at 65 MPH for a 45 minute one-way commute, even in temps down to 20 degrees or below. Besides my finger tips getting a little nippy, and the occasional brisk draft onto the front of my face, it's pretty cozy. :) The main issue is keeping all skin covered and the wind out. If the wind gets in (or you get wet) or you have any exposed flesh, you'll freeze out quickly.
 

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My grandfather would call you all a bunch of wimps.
His solution to the cold was to stuff a newspaper down the front of his jacket when he rode his Indian in the winter, which he did all the time.
Can't say I'm a chip off the old block. I hate riding in the cold now and usually quit when the temp falls below 60, even though I had a few years when I'd commute year-round.
Best item I owned then was a silk balaclava worn under my helmet.
It was ridiculously thin, but it stopped the wind and was great psychologically.
I'm a big believer that when your body is shaking uncontrollably from being cold it distracts dangerously from riding safely.
 

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45 - 50F is about my threshold for cold weather motorcycle riding, although I have no problem snowmobiling in sub zero temps. But I find it is easier to properly dress for snowmobiling in frigid temps than it is for riding a bike in those same conditions... for example, I wouldn't be able to operate the shift pedal on my bike with the Sorel boots that I wear for riding the Ski-Doo. Also you are a lot more exposed on a bike than you are on a snowmobile.

For those of you who will be braving the winter cold on your bikes, the one piece of advise I have for you is avoid wearing cotton layers... cotton clothing is the worst thing you can wear if your going to be outdoors in the winter. With all the high performance, technical base and mid layers available on the market today, in addition to the the old standards of wool and silk, there is no reason to freeze your tail off out there. Companies like Patagonia, Under Armor, Icebreaker, Mammut, Turtle Fur, Mountain Hardware, to name just a few, make the good stuff that will keep you warm underneath your outerwear.

As I'm writing this it's snowing outside my window at a pretty good rate per hour, and has been for the past few hours. I'm hoping to take my Ski-Doo Summit 600 out for rip on the gravel road in front of my place later today. Nothing like a little 2 stroke smoke in the air on a cold winters day. I'm thinking that in my neck of the woods, we're in for a real winter this year, with lots of snow. :D
 

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I don't prefer to ride when it's under 40 degrees. I have, though. The ONE piece of gear that makes it bearable for me is the barcalava. It covers the head and comes all the way down the neck and tucked under your jacket. I also wear some Bilt waterproof boots which also helps insulate, I rarely had cold feet. For other gear I like the insulated and padded waterproof riding pants (also Bilt), but they are really bulky and I feel like the marshmallow man in them, but warm! I sometimes use a freeze-out base layer over a regular shirt and under the jacket. Gloves are insulated and armored and do a pretty good job but the fingers still feel the cold on longer rides. Never had much interest in heated gear. I used to commute 32 miles a day to work and rode several times in the 30's and never got uncomfortably cold but it's not my favorite ride.
 

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I just have to keep telling myself that I save nearly $5 every day I take the bike instead of the car. All the motivation I need. :D
 

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My base layer is whatever I'm wearing to work which is business casual. On top of that I have Sedici pants and two layer Sedici jacket with a fleece jacket underneath. Nothing special waterproof work boots have so far kept my feet warm.

I wear a balaclava under my helmet which is adequate, but my helmet is a little drafty. This week I'm going to experiment with adding my Cold Avenger face mask (see my profile pic) under the helmet to try and seal things up and guarantee things are fog free.

I have some mitts on the way that attach over the handle bars and should allow me to comfortably wear my normal armored gloves. Right now I'm using a ski type glove with liners and my hands are frozen after a 30 minute ride to work.

Overall it's pretty comfy setup that is not too cumbersome. I learned a lot about my tolerances commuting year round by bicycle the past few years. In some cases specific solutions are required and in some cases more general ones will suffice.

OP- I think our temps and climates are similar enough that you can use my setup as a guide to start from. I don't think I'm especially cold tolerant, probably about average.
 

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venture heated gloves. self-contained, so no battery draw. nice!
 

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Current setup:
Upper body:
-White Tshisrt
-Nice polyester/cotton jacket
-Bilt Explorer waterproof jacket
-Baclava
-Icon Varent Helmet
Lower Body:
-Freeze out bottoms
-Icon jeans
-Converse High top Sneakers
Gloves:
-Cotton gloves under
-Sedi Headed gloves from CycleGear

Kept me warm for 20 min in ~30F
 

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45° - 50° F is about my threshold for cold weather motorcycle riding...
I agree. I will ride down to 45° - 50° F for no more than an hour, then I want it to warm up into the mid-50s° F if I expect to keep riding all day. It helps a lot (maybe psychologically) if the sun is shining brightly.
 

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All you need to keep you warm in the winter is a decent textile suit with removable thermal linings for the summer and as many garments under it that you feel necessary. A buff around the neck is good and waterproof overmitts over your gloves really help with the hands as well. I regularly ride in temperatures down to around -9C in the winter, and as long as you're well wrapped up, and the roads have been well gritted, it isn't a problem. ;)
 

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45F and below is colder for me now than it was 20 years ago. I guess that is what "maturity" does. :p

Heated grips don't take too much draw, especially the ones with different levels. If your hands stay warm, your limbs are better off.
 

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Gerbing's heated jacket with a controller. In addition to most of the rest of the stuff already suggested.
Yep, a heated jacket liner makes a huge difference. And the CBR has plenty of extra electrical power to run it. I prefer Warm-n-Safe brand, after having owned both.

All Heated Jacket Liners - Warm & Safe Heated Gear, LLC



Oh and I definitely agree about not wearing cotton as a base layer.
 

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+1 for heated grips and a Buff. I don't ride often enough to justify the cost of heated kit so insulated base layers under a windproof outer layer will have to do.
 

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Heated Gear is the way to go when the temp starts dropping. Heating your core is a must, if not body will naturally draw blood from your extremities to heat your core and keep your insides from freezing.

I wear
* silk balaclava under helmet - keeps head , ears and neck warm
* First gear 65 watt heated liner (best cold gear investment made)
* Sedici Hotwired gloves 22 watts (second best cold gear investment made)
* Revit Defender Jacket with the gortex liner (Gortex liner acts as wind barrier)
* Revit Defender pants with thermal and gortex liner in
* Wool socks
* TCX X-Five boots

Gloves plugs into liner, liner into bike no wires in the way and it draws less than 90 watts total so the 250 can handle it.

1 hour Commute down to 30 degree, average 45-50 mph, toasty as anything.

Under 30 degrees , I wear the same gear but use the GoldWing for commute as it offers more wind protection and I sit in still bubble of air with the wind protection.

Riding in the cold can be dangerous if not using the correct gear. Frostbite on exposed skin and hypothermia can happen quickly.

Be Warm, Be Safe
 

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I live in Kansas and temperatures have been down to teens in the morning. I go to work at 18F wearing the following:
- white hanes tshirt
- Color hanes t-shirt
- Champion hoodie from Target
- Wool scarf
- Textile ICON device jacket with liner
- Bilt full gloves that I bought for $30, took a few rides to break in.
- Levi's
- Ankle socks
- Nike tennis shoes
- Icon Airmada with all vents closed

I takes under 10 minutes to work and I stay under 50 mph. When I get to me desk at work my tshirt is still warm inside. My finger are a little cold but it is not a big deal. Knees and legs feel fine thanks to the fairings. I have ridden naked bikes before and your knees get stiff with the cold.
 
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