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Discussion Starter #1
hello! I’m a brand new rider. I just got a 2011 CBR250R last weekend. I’ve been working on slow speed maneuvering around my driveway and front yard and I have noticed that when the clutch isn’t engaged and I let off then get back on the throttle, it’s very jerky. I am practicing taking my weight off the handle bars by squeezing the gas tank, but I’m not sure if it is the bike not properly tuned or if I’m just too green at riding to have the throttle down. I desperately try to be as slow and soft with the throttle to get it to not be so jerky. Any suggestions?
 

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Hey. You're best off modulating the clutch lever to smooth out low speed maneuvers. I can't say I've noticed my cbr being very choppy, but the sv650 I have is pretty feral without using the clutch. They're not really like a car, having a wet clutch they can handle a bit more slippage than the dry clutch in a car, as long as you don't give be it heaps of curry while you're doing it. Plus they haven't got the driveline length or slop that cars have, so you tend to notice it a lot more.
 

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Check you're throttle cable adjustment. You don't want there to be any slack. I've noticed when there is slack and you go to twist the throttle like through a turn it will get a little jumpy/choppy.
 

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You're doing the right thing by trying to keep your grip on the throttle as light as possible. Many new riders give the throttle a "death grip" that quickly results in hand pain or fatigue. Being a new rider, your aim should be to make your inputs as light and smooth as possible and that simply takes practice. Don't get discouraged, just concentrate on rev matching when shifting, hand and foot coordination and especially that light grip on the throttle. Make it a priority every time you ride and it will soon become second nature.
 

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All good suggestions, but I would add - enroll in a MSF Basic Rider Course.

You need to learn the basics quickly and correctly, and teaching yourself isn't a great way to do it.

There's no time to figure it out on the street these days. All the basics of handling the cycle need to be automatic so you can keep your focus on changing road and traffic conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey. You're best off modulating the clutch lever to smooth out low speed maneuvers. I can't say I've noticed my cbr being very choppy, but the sv650 I have is pretty feral without using the clutch. They're not really like a car, having a wet clutch they can handle a bit more slippage than the dry clutch in a car, as long as you don't give be it heaps of curry while you're doing it. Plus they haven't got the driveline length or slop that cars have, so you tend to notice it a lot more.
I have definitely felt the difference between my manual truck and the CBR. I had the idea of using clutch to smooth it out, I’ll definitely try it, thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
All good suggestions, but I would add - enroll in a MSF Basic Rider Course.

You need to learn the basics quickly and correctly, and teaching yourself isn't a great way to do it.

There's no time to figure it out on the street these days. All the basics of handling the cycle need to be automatic so you can keep your focus on changing road and traffic conditions.
I am currently looking at getting a class a few weeks from now, I definitely would like to start without any bad habits!
 

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hello! I’m a brand new rider. I just got a 2011 CBR250R last weekend. I’ve been working on slow speed maneuvering around my driveway and front yard and I have noticed that when the clutch isn’t engaged and I let off then get back on the throttle, it’s very jerky. I am practicing taking my weight off the handle bars by squeezing the gas tank, but I’m not sure if it is the bike not properly tuned or if I’m just too green at riding to have the throttle down. I desperately try to be as slow and soft with the throttle to get it to not be so jerky. Any suggestions?
Definitely the green bug. The CBR's fueling is pretty much spot on and there is literally no jerkiness at extremely low speeds and on/off throttle transition. I would recommend you to check your throttle freeplay and make sure you time your clutch and throttle transition. Extremely slow maneuvers coupled with engine lugging will result in jerky throttle transition. This is dangerous at times, the vehicle can stall and you may take a spill.

Good luck.

Cheers!
VJ
 
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