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Discussion Starter #1
I have had my CBR250r for about 3 years/seasons. I love the bike and ride it all the time. Its my first bike and I don't know anything else. I have parts on the way and still would like to modify a few aspects. Yet at the same time I feel our time together is going to end at some point. I'm sure a few people on this site have watched people come and go as a lot of people "graduate" into a larger bike.

I commute with my bike and ride it frequently to work. I love speed and have a faster car. That being said I wish I had greater passing ability when on the highways, something the 250 lacks. Fully proud of my 250 I park it next to any other bike and proudly state "I have a CBR250" when any one asks. Again, I would like to twist my wrist and make it past slow cars in the passing lane when commuting to work rather than plan a pass when the opportunity arises.

I'm currently looking at CBR600's and Yamaha R6's with about 15-30,000 miles as this is what is close to my price range on the used market. I could see myself making a move in the next year. Yet, I wish I had enough money and space to keep my CBR and also get myself a 600.

I'm not posting with questions but thought I'd share my thoughts as I bet others here have been in my shoes. Anyone here have a 600? I know a few people here have had them and still returned to the CBR250. Why do you guys stick with a 250 when you have the riding skills to ride any bike?

Feel free to speak your peace and add. Again, I do not really have a huge point with this post but to convey my thoughts and start a conversation with like minded internet friends.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Things I love about the CBR250 is the simplicity of the bike. I can easily afford parts and seems this bike it an easy bike to work on. The bike it very easy to maneuver yet I don't have anything else to base this on other than it just feels second nature to drive. The gas mileage is great and I love to brag about this to people with larger bikes. I also can sneak by without blasting out eardrums. My bike is all black and I continue to "black it out". I'll have to post some pics in the near future.
 

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... That being said I wish I had greater passing ability when on the highways, something the 250 lacks. I would like to twist my wrist and make it past slow cars in the passing lane when commuting to work rather than plan a pass when the opportunity arises.

... thought I'd share my thoughts as I bet others here have been in my shoes. Anyone here have a 600?
Yes I have been in your shoes, a couple of years back. I sold my 250R and moved up to the CBR300 but it still wasn't quick enough (IMO) for comfortable overtaking maneuvers. I ride a lot with other riders on bigger machinery so I often got left behind. Not because they were riding at 100 MPH but because they could pass quickly and safely where I couldn't.

So I didnt go all the way to a 600 but bought a Kawasaki Ninja 400 instead. It is still the same light weight as the 250/300's but nearly twice as much power (19.4 kW vs 36kW) and will pull around 120MPH. More than ample grunt but best of all they are only about 5K USD to buy, way cheaper than a 600.
Another option to consider perhaps.
 

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My son has a '05 R6 that I have some time on, and it's kinda of a pain (for me). Riding position is track-oriented, which gets old quick when on the hwy. Tons of power, mostly WAY up there, but it does have more in the middle than I expected.

The CBR600 is most likely a better street bike than the R6, but a Super Sport 600 is not the most versatile choice for most. Also check your insurance before you buy. You may be surprised (shocked).

The mid-sized "sporty" bikes like the Ninja 650, SV650, FZ-07 (now MT-07) and new Ninja 400 all have adequate power for most, and quite a bit more than you are used to.
 

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I rode 250 cc sized bikes for fifty-four years before "graduating" to a larger bike. I figured that at 72 I needed ABS and used that as an excuse to get a Honda CB500XA. It will pass with authority up to 90-95 mph, beyond that, the acceleration slows down. That is plenty of bike for an old geezer like me, and it has averaged a bit over 68 mpg (US gallons) for the past 17K miles. I do love that bike.
 

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I'm currently looking at CBR600's and Yamaha R6's with about 15-30,000 miles as this is what is close to my price range on the used market. I could see myself making a move in the next year. Yet, I wish I had enough money and space to keep my CBR and also get myself a 600.

I'm not posting with questions but thought I'd share my thoughts as I bet others here have been in my shoes. Anyone here have a 600? I know a few people here have had them and still returned to the CBR250. Why do you guys stick with a 250 when you have the riding skills to ride any bike?

Feel free to speak your peace and add. Again, I do not really have a huge point with this post but to convey my thoughts and start a conversation with like minded internet friends.

Cause the slow bikes are more fun! When you restrain yourself to not-getting-arrested kind of speeds, a fast bike really isn't much more fun. I wanted the engine design (I4) of the bigger bikes, but I also wanted a slow bike that I can romp on, so I got my four cylinder CBR 250R. I had ridden a VF500 and then a VFR 800 before my CBR 250R, and while the V4 sounds great and I just LOVE fuel injection, it was just too fast to truly enjoy. Since then I also got a VFR 400, so I can enjoy sweet V4 music while still being not too fast, but it still has carbs. :crying:
If you were satisfied with your CBR 250R for so long, and are looking for four cylinders for a reasonable price, check out the CBR 650F. It is the less racy alternative to the CBR 600RR, which will have a riding position more similar to your CBR 250R, and will get better fuel economy than the 600.
 

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Wow, jsonder you're 72? Now I don't feel so bad about turning 67 next month and still riding a sportbike instead of a cruiser...lol.
As far as "moving up" an R6 or CBR600 is going to be a huge adjustment in ergonomics for someone coming off a CBR250R. You'd better be sure you like the more aggressive body positioning on the bike before you drive away from the dealership. You don't want to find out days later on your first long trip that it's a little too much for you.
And god, the price of those RR 600s these days. Instead of paying north of 10k for a 600, you could buy a Ninja 400 or CBR500R for half that and still keep the CBR250R in your stable easily.
 

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I'm in the same boat. I decided that I'd wait one more year to go to the bigger sport bike (which I want to be a cbr600rr). I've been riding 1yr 3mo on the cbr250r and find that I'm getting good, but still learning a lot about riding the twisty roads that I love.
 

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The CB500 series are variations on a utility bike. Slight changes in ergos and tupperware, but, basically a modern equivalent of the old courier bike (CX500).

Mine has averaged over 68 mpg (US gallons) during the 17200 miles that I have ridden it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have been reading a lot of old posts from this site and also other sites about upgrading from a 250. It seems a lot of the people who keep the 250 for good are the more experienced and some older riders. The 250 fits a niche that in some ways can ot be replaced. It makes we want to keep my 250. However, i then could not afford a whole new bike, afford the space for a new bike nor pay for yet more insurance. Its one or the other as far as my current bike or a new bike.

A popular theme is 600s will have you end up crashing. Yet I thoroughly worried about this prior to owning my first bike; cbr250. One poster replied to that if you stay responsible you will be safe on any bike. That is how I plan on being.

I just have a hard time getting rid of things and I currently love my 250. This is my 3rd season with it and I truly become a better rider with each season and am amazed what I learn with each year.

I wish more people posted on this site. It seems this site had its hey day about 5+ years ago and there are only a few straglers left and Im part of that club and proud of it.
 

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A popular theme is 600s will have you end up crashing. Yet I thoroughly worried about this prior to owning my first bike; cbr250. One poster replied to that if you stay responsible you will be safe on any bike. That is how I plan on being.

I just have a hard time getting rid of things and I currently love my 250. This is my 3rd season with it and I truly become a better rider with each season and am amazed what I learn with each year.
A current 600 super sport is a monster once it's wound up. Not much slower in acceleration or top speed from a 1000 super sport. If you don't wind it up it's manageable, but does it fit your riding style and what you are looking for?

Most 600 super sports are set-up for maximum cornering and handling, and sacrifice some things to get it. Some sacrifice more things than others.

Because your finances are limited, I would check into the insurance - that may help you decide.

What are you looking for from a new bike? More power? Better highway cruising? Better cornering and overall performance? More comfort?

With ultimate self control you should be able to ride any bike, but in the real world there are times most of us fall short of that. I'm firmly in that category, and will eventually go full-tilt at some point with whatever I'm on - but I've also survived riding for over 40 years and have experience with such things.

Just be careful if you decide to go that route. The difference in performance moving from your 250 to a 600 will be shocking.
 

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One suggestion is to make "bike payments" to your bank account or money market fund. Eventually, you will be able to buy your bigger bike. If you pay cash, you do not have to have collision insurance, just liability. My bill for the 223 cc dual-sport and the 471 cc street bike will be $119 for the next year.

I am not sure if my rates are discounted or increased because of my age, but they are through AARP and use Foremost Insurance. (I renewed yesterday, so the numbers are fresh in my mind.)

One thing to keep in mind, is that as you go up in engine size and bike weight, the insurance rate increases substantially. If I were buying a bike just for in-town use, it would be the new Super Cub (125 cc) that will become available (in the USA) next model year.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
A current 600 super sport is a monster once it's wound up. Not much slower in acceleration or top speed from a 1000 super sport. If you don't wind it up it's manageable, but does it fit your riding style and what you are looking for?

Most 600 super sports are set-up for maximum cornering and handling, and sacrifice some things to get it. Some sacrifice more things than others.

Because your finances are limited, I would check into the insurance - that may help you decide.

What are you looking for from a new bike? More power? Better highway cruising? Better cornering and overall performance? More comfort?

With ultimate self control you should be able to ride any bike, but in the real world there are times most of us fall short of that. I'm firmly in that category, and will eventually go full-tilt at some point with whatever I'm on - but I've also survived riding for over 40 years and have experience with such things.

Just be careful if you decide to go that route. The difference in performance moving from your 250 to a 600 will be shocking.
I appreciate your question. The short answer is I would like to have the ability to zip past cars when ever I feel like it and continue at that pace so an upset driver could not catch up to me. The times I am wanting more speed/power is mostly on the highway on my way home from work 1-3x/week. Sometimes on rural roads it would be nice to pass cars as well. I have a Mazdaspeed3 with a turbo and consider myself an smart/aggressive driver. The type of driver that is not a jerk but can get you from point A-B very quickly yet safely. The same does for my riding. I will never crash my bike if I have anything to do with it. I do my very best to not even allow the oops to happen. Same with my car. I don't allow for oops' and know when to take it slow as well as when I can allow myself to hit the gas.

Once I bought my first bike, CBR250, I could not sleep as I worried I would some how crash without my control of the situation. Now that 3 seasons have passed I realized that if you do not put yourself in those positions they won't happen. Sure there are elements out of my control but I also could get hit by a car while walking down the street.

I never really desired more handling from a bike as I only know the CBR250. This will be my standard. My typical cruises would be into the mountains of Pennsylvania. I like going through twisting roads and try to go as fast as I could and nail each turn. Again, I don't get into close calls as I know my limits. I do like shifting and worry these rides with a 600rr would have no shifting and perhaps I would only use 1st gear and wrist control.

As far as comfort. The CBR250 is supper comfy. I'm 6'1" and 230lbs. The CBR250 fits perfectly. I sat on an R1 and though the handles were lower and the tank was wider but still felt fine. In the past I wished for a lower set of handle bars and I don't think I'd mind this on a new bike.

Sometimes being a large guy I think I might look silly on a 250. I really don't care what people think of how I look but maybe I do. I could stare at my bike all day though and absolutely love the look. Yet, when I look out the window at work I sometimes think the 250 looks tiny and a nice chunky bike would be more satisfying to look at. You have to have pride of your vehicle and I sometimes and torn on this alone.
 

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I appreciate your question. The short answer is I would like to have the ability to zip past cars when ever I feel like it and continue at that pace so an upset driver could not catch up to me. The times I am wanting more speed/power is mostly on the highway on my way home from work 1-3x/week. Sometimes on rural roads it would be nice to pass cars as well. I have a Mazdaspeed3 with a turbo and consider myself an smart/aggressive driver. The type of driver that is not a jerk but can get you from point A-B very quickly yet safely. The same does for my riding. I will never crash my bike if I have anything to do with it. I do my very best to not even allow the oops to happen. Same with my car. I don't allow for oops' and know when to take it slow as well as when I can allow myself to hit the gas.

Once I bought my first bike, CBR250, I could not sleep as I worried I would some how crash without my control of the situation. Now that 3 seasons have passed I realized that if you do not put yourself in those positions they won't happen. Sure there are elements out of my control but I also could get hit by a car while walking down the street.

I never really desired more handling from a bike as I only know the CBR250. This will be my standard. My typical cruises would be into the mountains of Pennsylvania. I like going through twisting roads and try to go as fast as I could and nail each turn. Again, I don't get into close calls as I know my limits. I do like shifting and worry these rides with a 600rr would have no shifting and perhaps I would only use 1st gear and wrist control.
Probably don't want to hear this, but...

Let me stop you right there. The last part about an upset driver not catching you shouldn't even be a requirement if you are doing it right.

Your statements tell me you would be using any new-found power you get. If you could not sleep worrying about keeping your 250 under control, you will have many sleepless nights with a 600. Driving a powerful car fast and a powerful cycle fast are two completely different things.

Going as fast as you could and nailing it each turn is reasonably easy on the 250, but a completely different story on a 600. You will gain speed between corners at a much higher rate on a 600, which means you will be entering turns requiring much more braking than you are used to. That's easy to miscalculate if you are not familiar with it.

I'll just say that you should be cautious of buying a full-on 600cc sport bike. That's just my opinion. One of my boys (21) has taken my advice and purchased a VFR800, which he loves. The other (18) hasn't, and has an R6. He has been riding since he was about 4, but last season was surprised by some gravel entering a corner and went down about 20 MPH. A good lesson. I'm still not sure he's mature enough for the R6. At that age I wasn't mature enough for the 750 Ninja I was riding, and had numerous close calls. My previous 5 years of dirt riding and racing saved me from disaster many times. That and some dumb luck.

I ride a moderate 650cc sporty twin, and it provides all of the power, comfort, and capability that I can reasonably utilize on the street. There are other mid-sized bikes (like VFR) that are sporty, but not full-on sport bikes that are great all-around street bikes as well. The torque from a mid-sized twin or V4 is nice to have around town, especially for a larger rider.

I'm just giving you my opinion so hopefully you will think about it quite a bit before making your decision.
 

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I don't know but if you're pissing off people so much that you fear them and feel a need to run away from them then I would say you're doing something wrong in your riding...:|


But anyway...you might want to demo different bikes. I was trained on an Er-6n (might have a different name in the US, it's the naked version of the Ninja 650) which is a two cylinder with 72HP. That thing was a rocket ship compared to the 250 with plenty of torque and acceleration. Maybe you should try out some 650s too to see whether that's enough power for you. They are probably also cheaper to insure.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Probably don't want to hear this, but...

Let me stop you right there. The last part about an upset driver not catching you shouldn't even be a requirement if you are doing it right.

Your statements tell me you would be using any new-found power you get. If you could not sleep worrying about keeping your 250 under control, you will have many sleepless nights with a 600. Driving a powerful car fast and a powerful cycle fast are two completely different things.

Going as fast as you could and nailing it each turn is reasonably easy on the 250, but a completely different story on a 600. You will gain speed between corners at a much higher rate on a 600, which means you will be entering turns requiring much more braking than you are used to. That's easy to miscalculate if you are not familiar with it.

I'll just say that you should be cautious of buying a full-on 600cc sport bike. That's just my opinion. One of my boys (21) has taken my advice and purchased a VFR800, which he loves. The other (18) hasn't, and has an R6. He has been riding since he was about 4, but last season was surprised by some gravel entering a corner and went down about 20 MPH. A good lesson. I'm still not sure he's mature enough for the R6. At that age I wasn't mature enough for the 750 Ninja I was riding, and had numerous close calls. My previous 5 years of dirt riding and racing saved me from disaster many times. That and some dumb luck.

I ride a moderate 650cc sporty twin, and it provides all of the power, comfort, and capability that I can reasonably utilize on the street. There are other mid-sized bikes (like VFR) that are sporty, but not full-on sport bikes that are great all-around street bikes as well. The torque from a mid-sized twin or V4 is nice to have around town, especially for a larger rider.

I'm just giving you my opinion so hopefully you will think about it quite a bit before making your decision.
I appreciate your opinion!

What I mean by people getting pissed off...I live in the North East of USA. People have an attitude for no reason. Think stereotype NewYork city personality from a TV show. When ever you pass anyone around here they are mad at you No Matter how its done. As if you are thumbing your nose when you pass them. Its just how it is around here. I'm not a jerk driver but I enjoy speed. So I do plan to pass people and would prefer to just get away from them without worrying about someone trying to do something stupid. It happens.

Nailing a turn also could mean anywhere from catching the perfect angle at max (for my skill level) speed all the way to catching that same angel at 10mph if I'm not feeling it. Either way I "nailed the turn as fast as I could for the moment." Again, I won't put myself in a position in which I feel I would loose it by any means. There is a time to drive fast and a time to drive slow. I'm a responsible driver more than I am a speed demon. BUT...I know it sounds bad in text.

And what I meant by loosing sleep before buying the 250. I worried all night long that somehow I was going to have crash, or close call. Here I handle driving a bike quite well and feel confident that I won't crash. I'm not trying to be cocky. I once read a post from a rider who said that they never had a close call in twenty years of driving and this was due to them always being aware and never allowing the situation for a close call to occur. I want to be that rider. I am that driver...

I don't know but if you're pissing off people so much that you fear them and feel a need to run away from them then I would say you're doing something wrong in your riding...:|


But anyway...you might want to demo different bikes. I was trained on an Er-6n (might have a different name in the US, it's the naked version of the Ninja 650) which is a two cylinder with 72HP. That thing was a rocket ship compared to the 250 with plenty of torque and acceleration. Maybe you should try out some 650s too to see whether that's enough power for you. They are probably also cheaper to insure.
Again, the common reaction around here is to be mad at people for passing you despite the circumstances. I travelled out west a few times and was amazed that people said hello and smiled when you look at them while out here the same look could start a fight between two people. I mean its not that bad but yes there is an attitude amongst people around here compared to other areas of the nation and it translates to driving as well. I don't cut people off or anything or perform ill mannered maneuvers.

I do like the idea of trying bikes out and should really investigate where there are going to be demos days at the bike dealers around here. That would probably be the best thing to do. Last chance I had to drive another bike my buddy asked if I wanted to ride his new Indian cruiser or his R1. It was my second time driving with another rider and I said I wanted to still practice with my 250 when riding with another person.




I appreciate you guys looking out for me. But you guys know...you get a motorcycle for the thrill. But if we are still here to talk about it we must have enough restraint and safety goals to return each night to post about it and converse. I hope I didn't sound stupid or irresponsible with my replies.
 

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I will just add that I haven't crashed recently (my off-road, track, and road crashes in my 40+ year riding career easily number over a dozen), but I expect to every time out. I don't think about it when riding, but I know it's always a possibility. That's why I wear full gear every time.

I lived in the Chicago area for 20 years, and know the type of driver you mean. I've avoided many traffic-related incidents that could have turned into "close calls", but there are times where you will need to get away from a bad situation. If I run into a bad driver that is going fast, I slow down. If I run into a bad driver that is going slow, I speed up. I will never try to outrun a bad or aggressive driver.

Don't think too much about crashing (it increases the chances of it happening), but always be prepared for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I will just add that I haven't crashed recently, but I expect to every time out. I don't think about it when riding, but I know it's always a possibility. That's why I wear full gear every time.

I lived in the Chicago area for 20 years, and know the type of driver you mean. I've avoided many traffic-related incidents that could have turned into "close calls", but there are times where you will need to get away from a bad situation. If I run into a bad driver that is going fast, I slow down. If I run into a bad driver that is going slow, I speed up. I will never try to outrun a bad or aggressive driver.

Don't think too much about crashing (it increases the chances of it happening), but always be prepared for it.
Well put. I too wear my suit of Dainese armor when riding from head to toe.
 
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