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So I got a cbr250r, never had a motorcycle before, never rode a motorcycle before

I have about 200miles on it. I wear a helmet, jacket, riding pants, gloves, boots. I ride slow on the driveway on sundays:)... Seriously though, I stay out of traffic, and dont push my limits. I've had some instruction from more experienced folks. I "have a bell on my motorcycle"- whatever that means. I like riding the bike. Its pretty fun.

My friends look at me funny, like that is so unlike you, or like you're going to kill yourself.

No one says, cool man, good for you.

Mom and dad certainly discouraged motorcycle riding growing up... but that was a long time ago (like 30 years ago).

Is this really that dangerous. Am I going to kill myself? Doesn't a bit of good sense and a whopping amount of defensive driving offer some modicum of saftey? I mean, I fly airplanes, how much more dangerous could this possibly be if risks are properly managed?
 

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I got the same attitude, hell, the insurance person pretty much tried to scare me to death, lol. Its odd, even odder you fly planes, my other fear:)
 

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Lots of people will try and scare you about motorcycle riding. If you look at the stats - simply by: (a) not driving under the influence, and (b) not driving at night will lessen your chance for being a "stat" (crash) by more than 50%.
While I can't prove this, I believe that by being a good defensive driver and driving with an attitude of always having an escape path and a healthy skepticism of the cagers out there goes a long way to keep you out of trouble.
I have gone through 5 cycles yielding mileage of around 35,000 w/ no crashes. Disclaimer - I do admit to praying to GOD and asking for safety and protection.
 

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True

This reaction is common in the US where we are spoiled and drive gas guzzling SUVs. I got some of the same thing when I said I was going to ride on the highway 40 miles back and forth to work every day. People don't see motorcycles and scooters as real means of transportation here yet. But they will have to learn when gas is $10 a gallon. I hope I can pave the way and won't get hit while people learn to accept and watch out for us. Ride safe and represent Honda's dream of personal transportation.
 

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Its a billion times more dangerous than flying aircraft.. you may be maimed or even killed.. but we accept that... your parents & friends know that.

Do as many rider training courses at all levels, road and track to do your part in minimising the statistics.

Welcome to motorcycling. Enjoy.

ps.. if a car hits you its not their 'fault'.. we are taught to avoid them, they are ALL out to kill you.
 

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Yes, motorcycling is dangerous. Read the Owner's Manual; it suggests as much from the first page.

Here from the 4th page:

The motorcycle presents you a challenge to master the machine, a challenge to adventure. You ride through the wind, linked to the road by a vehicle that responds to your commands as no other does. Unlike an automobile, there is no metal cage around you. Like an airplane, a pre-ride inspection and regular maintenance are essential to your safety. Your reward is freedom.

It stands to reason; on a motorcycle you are more vulnerable, and statistics confirm it.

You cannot rely on technology such as ABS, and fancy riding gear, to protect you form a dangerous situation the way it can in a car. With ABS in a car even a total incompetent can slam on the brakes and keep some control of their vehicle. If it does come to a crunch, there is quite a bit of mandated built in protection.

On a motorcycle ABS can help to make a quick stop in a straight line, but try swerving to avoid something under heavy braking and you are likely to land up on your arse, testing the effectiveness of that fancy gear. It is great for preventing abrasions as you slide along, and a decent helmet will give you a fighting chance if you get a tap on the head. However, hit something solid.... or worse, a couple of tons of something moving at even a moderate speed..... and that gear all becomes quite flimsy. You can get badly hurt or die in a situation that someone in car would walk away from, unscathed.

Yet people do ride, and ride safely for years and thousands of miles. They (we) are well aware of the risks, but live with them.

I reckon I have ridden over 400,000 km on the road, in over a dozen countries, since I was licenced in 1969 (and spent a lot of time off road as well, starting several years before that). The only potentially serious accident I have had on the road was in 1976. A car passing another at high speed cut in and knocked me off.

"I didn't even see you," said the driver.

He was to blame, but I realised that if I had used my mirrors (and ears) more, and had been better positioned on the road the accident would probably not have happened. And I have not stopped learning.

My observation is that a few people have a lot of accidents, while there are others who seldom get involved in incidents. Riding skills, gear, and technology all have a place, but the bottom line is attitude and awareness of what is going on around you.

As I have said before, you can show off how safety conscious you are with all your colourful kevlar gear, but if you ride with bulletproof attitude you are asking for trouble.
 

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Everything Michael said +1.

In 1994 I'd just lashed out $15,000 on the latest and greatest bike of my dreams a YZF750.. 3 months later I was in a wheelchair for 12 months and didnt walk unaided for 3 yrs.. the bike was snapped in half and sold for scrap, a Shoei helmet broken the chinpiece. Multiple compound fractures and head injuries that came back to bite me decades later.

It was a hit and run and they never found the driver.

Took years to accept, But I accept now almost 20 yrs later I just wrong place wrong time... Night time, 80kph traffic light intersection, stolen car, they ran a red at 160kph. and I luckily Tboned them instead of them Tboning me.

I got back on the horse in '98.

We cannot control everything... when your number is up~ your number is up.

Live life. :)
 

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Everything Michael said +1.

In 1994 I'd just lashed out $15,000 on the latest and greatest bike of my dreams a YZF750.. 3 months later I was in a wheelchair for 12 months and didnt walk unaided for 3 yrs.. the bike was snapped in half and sold for scrap, a Shoei helmet broken the chinpiece. Multiple compound fractures and head injuries that came back to bite me decades later.

It was a hit and run and they never found the driver.

Took years to accept, But I accept now almost 20 yrs later I just wrong place wrong time... Night time, 80kph traffic light intersection, stolen car, they ran a red at 160kph. and I luckily Tboned them instead of them Tboning me.

I got back on the horse in '98.

We cannot control everything... when your number is up~ your number is up.

Live life. :)
Scary man....:eek: I can just imagine what it could have been if you were even +1kmph on your speedometer
 

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Bikes are dangerous because if something does happen your much more likely to get hurt or killed. But dont drink and drive, avoid night riding, use common sence, keep an eye on the other guy and your chances of being involved accident are much less.
 

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What I 'hate' is;
-ppl who want to remove std indicators, change the mirrors, or fit the wrong tyres.
-ppl who have their first crash and then realise bikes are dangerous to ride and they
give up or blame someone else for their bingle.
-ppl who buy their first bike and want to make performance upgrades/bling/farkles when clearly they need lessons or at least more experience (in years not weeks)
-ppl who think a 250 is just a stepping stone to an R1/R6 a year later.

Sorry if this offends many here but it really makes me pray for their bike riding future.

*Oh... and ppl who dont read their owners maunal.. its not exactly Quantum physics... Honda made this manual simpler than any other bike ever built.
 

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Intersections

I'm sorry that had to happen to you. I had the same wreck but I was in a big american car. Coming through down town Houston where a forest of high rise buildings block any view. If they would have hit me in the drivers door instead of me hitting them in the door, It would have been very bad even though I was in a car. Now I approach every intersection as if it will happen again and only ride as fast as I can "see".
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Everything Michael said +1.

In 1994 I'd just lashed out $15,000 on the latest and greatest bike of my dreams a YZF750.. 3 months later I was in a wheelchair for 12 months and didnt walk unaided for 3 yrs.. the bike was snapped in half and sold for scrap, a Shoei helmet broken the chinpiece. Multiple compound fractures and head injuries that came back to bite me decades later.

It was a hit and run and they never found the driver.

Took years to accept, But I accept now almost 20 yrs later I just wrong place wrong time... Night time, 80kph traffic light intersection, stolen car, they ran a red at 160kph. and I luckily Tboned them instead of them Tboning me.

I got back on the horse in '98.

We cannot control everything... when your number is up~ your number is up.

Live life. :)
 

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See if I had the CBR250abs I have now I could have braked even harder lol

The YZF750 was known for the most savage 6 piston brakes ever to be put on a motorcycle haha.
 

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Yes motorcycling comes with some clear risks. A safe rider tries to reduce these risks as much as possible - and this includes following many of the suggestions offered in this thread.

Interestingly, there have been more (reported) bicycle deaths where I am living than motorcycle deaths this year. It may simply be that there are many more people riding bicycles than motorcycles. The bicycling season may also run a little longer than the motorcycle season. Heck - it could be merely due to chance. Still - bicycling apparently comes with some inherent risks too. Yet - motorcycles seem to get the bad rap. It's funny - a couple of months ago I rode my mountain bike around the city. I was surprised by how vulnerable I felt in shorts, tee-shirt, and helmet. Cars were whizzing past me, cutting in front of me at intersections, driving by so close I could reach out and touch them. I was constantly shoulder checking even though my lane position rarely changed. I didn't have any mirrors to assist me in seeing what was coming from behind. My head was spinning around more often than Regan MacNeil's. I certainly feel much safer on a motorcycle in this environment compared to a bicycle. Whether this feeling is supported by base-rates or not remains to be seen.

When I suit up to ride, I feel like I am going into battle. My Joe Rocket attire feels like it weighs about the same as chain mail. And in many ways - it IS a battle out on the streets and highways. You are battlling cars, trucks, pedestrians, animals - a ceaseless onslaught from every direction. You have to plan your strategy carefully and execute it thoughtfully and skillfully.

I tip my visor in respect to those on this forum who have endured all of the above and more for many years and countless miles. You people are the warriors. Motorcycling has a cruel way of naturally selecting only those who are able to successfully adapt to the ever changing riding environment. Those who don't adapt - die. You are still here.

What's that expression? "There are young riders, old riders, and careless riders. But there are NO old, careless riders".

Mike
 

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I do about 2000km a year cycling in thunder bay... I think that it is more here that is dangerous than cycling in general.. People are very aggressive, they don't know the rules and they don't care. It doesn't help that they don't like the new bike lanes that went over the car lanes either, it's gotten much worse over the last 2 years. It's a daily thing of people shouting things at you or throwing cans or bottles at you.. It's my main reason to look to switch to motorcycling next year.
Also, cycling in the city without mirrors feels incredibly dangerous, i wouldn't do it.
 

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I was told that Erik Estrada said this after his nasty crash, but I doubt he was the first.

There are only two kinds of riders. Those who have been down, and those who are going down.
 

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I bought a bike after never riding on one and not even knowing how to turn the thing on. never driving any kind of manual trasmission at all. i had to have the dealership drop it off in my driveway cause i couldnt ride it home. i taught myself, completely by myself, in my own driveway. simply going back and forth. LOL. then ventured off on the quiet side streets by my house. i am going to a training class next spring to get endorsed. people laugh at me. anyone that owns a bike laughs at me cause i bought a 250 and they got a big badddddd 600 or whatever the bike is. but i'm not in this to have a bike to race. i'm in it to have fun and enjoy myself doing something i've always wanted to do. a bike that gets up to 90 mph is compeltely fine with me. life is a million times better when you just stop caring about what other peoples opinions are.
 

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Good for you Sizemore. Did the same thing with a half-completed ultralight kit.

Even though you are likely to get a few "go take a safety course" advice tidbits, and of course good advice it is, good for you.
 

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here in michigan all the courses are over with. by the time i got my bike this summer it was over. i guess february will be the first time i can even sign up for next years courses. i have found shifting from 1st to 2nd, and or going from a complete stop to moving has been my biggest problem. i started out stalling my bike a lot in my driveway. then i got it to where i'm not doing that but i feel i rev the engine to high before i am comfortable letting the clutch out to get into first. it is just my shifting is not smooth yet. i am sure my clutch HATES me. but how else am i going to learn.
 

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@sizemore112:

If I were in your shoes (which I'm not, so you may have a different opinion), unless you have a big wide empty parking lot within throwing distance of your house, I'd store the bike for the winter and wait to take the MSF course in the spring. The good weather in our fair state is pretty much gone by now anyway.

Register now, if you can, because the classes fill fast and you don't want to be on the waiting list until the middle of summer. Look for a class that's subsidized through the Secretary of State so that you only have to pay $25 instead of $225 or more. Probably the biggest advantage to waiting is that if you screw up while learning, you trash one of their bikes, not yours.
 
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