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Hi! I just got a 2011 cbr250r about a week ago, and the guy who had it didn’t take care of it. I’ve fixed a few things with no issue, but (little did I know) that there’s some things about bikes that are TOTALLY DIFFERENT than cars- which has always been my strong point. The bike was more jerky than I think it should’ve been, so I tightened the chain slack, but when I did I also completely screwed up the alignment notches on the rear wheel, and noticed a few problems after I did it. The chain it tapping on the slider bar, and the brakes are dragging the rear wheel. The rear wheel is crooked now, and it was jammed on the swing arm bc I over torqued it and bent it... I bent it back, and it’s not jammed like it was, but on this bike I can tighten the chain more, but can’t loosen it. The wheel needs to be moved forward. The notches are way off, and I’m trying to get the notches to line up, but this cbr adjustment setup sux! What should I do to scooch the wheel forward when it’s jammed? Beat it with a hammer? Remove the axle nut completely? Will someone tell me how to fix this ******************** thing?
 

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Loosen the axle, but don't take it out. I like to leave it just tight enough so it stays where you put it.

The brake caliper mount can bind, so check that it is free to move. You may need to grab the wheel and aggressively move it side to side to free it up. You will need to have the cycle on a rear stand and the wheel off the ground to do any of this in a reasonable manner.

There are a few ways to move the wheel forward. You can back off the adjuster bolts and tap them forward, tap forward on the axle, or put a rag in the chain/sprocket to make it overly tight - which will pull it forward.

Always make sure you have checked for the tightest spot before setting the chain slack.

Watch this video on how to adjust and align the chain -
 

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Thank you for the reply- I did not see it until after I was done though... I managed to get it done- It was actually the caliper that had that wheel jammed up where it wasn’t coming loose. Not on the rotor, but on the swingarm. I just ended up taking everything apart and putting it back together evenly. Now it’s aligned and the chain slack is ok. It’s making a noise that it wasn’t before though. It’s tapping against the chain slider- isn’t it supposed to do that though? I didn’t notice it before. I’m gonna loosen it a little
 

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Thank you for the reply- I did not see it until after I was done though... I managed to get it done- It was actually the caliper that had that wheel jammed up where it wasn’t coming loose. Not on the rotor, but on the swingarm. I just ended up taking everything apart and putting it back together evenly. Now it’s aligned and the chain slack is ok. It’s making a noise that it wasn’t before though. It’s tapping against the chain slider- isn’t it supposed to do that though? I didn’t notice it before. I’m gonna loosen it a little
Good you got it sorted out.

The caliper bracket/stay needs to be able to slide where it's held by the swingarm, and it can get packed with road grime and corrosion so it won't move freely.

As far as the noise goes, a chain will usually make noise if it's too tight. Better to be on the side of slightly loose. That's why you need to be sure to set the slack at the loosest part.

In the video he uses an Allen wrench in the sprocket to pull the wheel forward snugly before tightening the axle - which works - but my son works with OEM chain suppliers and learned that they recommend just using a rag instead. It does the same thing, but with less chances of any damage to the chain or sprocket.

It's a slick way to make sure the wheel is pulled tightly against the adjusters.
 
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