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Discussion Starter #1
Im getting ready to take my Riders Course this month and I want to get my own helmet rather than use a loaner from the class and I was wondering what style of helmet you guys use with this bike (cbr250). I wear glasses so I know most full faced helmets will require that I take my glasses off before putting on and taking off helmet.

Any of you guys wear an open face helmet with shield?

Thanks,

Rudipides aka Randy
 

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I wear glasses as well. I picked up a Shoei RF-1100. Fits me perfectly.

Ultimately it comes down to what fits you best. You can Google for 'motorcycle helmet fitting' to find plenty of information to help ensure you buy a properly fitting lid.

I personally like full face helmets. Even if I rode a Harley I would still wear a full-face helmet. Find the one that fits you best then worry about color.
 

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I use what they call a "modular helmet". It's a full face helmet where the face flips up, makes it a cinch to get all ready without steaming the glasses, but still being able to wear them while getting suited up. It's a matter of personal preference though, find one that fits first, then go from there. One advantage of a full face though is you don't have to be worried about getting pelted by bugs/rocks/sand on the lower part of the face, unlike a helmet with a face shield, where those types of things can and will fly under the bottom of the shield. In the end, it's your call though.
 

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Keep in mind that the MSF class usually requires a full face helmet. I bought a Scorpion EXO1000.
 

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it all comes down to how much money you want to spend.
I was going to go with one of the higher end scorpions but went this route insted.
cheap, fits well, award wining and they do have a color scheme that works well with the red CBR Oh and the LED's work grrrreat!
GMAX GM68S Helmet - webBikeWorld
The visor realy is invisible and it flows alot of air as well.
 

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Open face for me

I never have been able to get along with full face helmets (started riding before they were invented) and only use a visor in heavy rain, if it is vey cold, or I am going to cover a more than couple of hundred kilometres on a motorway at relatively high speed (over 90 km/h).

But then, generally I prefer meander the byways and like to feel, smell, and even taste the environment around me (salt spray on the coast, for instance). That is what I enjoy more than high speed. If I do go hard, it is on twisties where speeds are still relatively low, not on boring high speed roads.

I have found the odd time I have worn a full face helmet, I ride faster. I reckon it is because I have less sensation of speed, also it takes away part of what I enjoy about motorcycling, so I go faster for a different buzz.

No matter how skilled you are and how much gear you have on, the faster you go the greater the chance of an accident, and the higher the risk of serious injury.

If I was into racing or doing a lot of time on high speed highways I would learn to like full face helmets. It comes down to risk management. For what I do and where I ride, an open face helmet suits me, and is adequate for my level of risk.

I don't care what road safety zealots say; choose a style of helmet that suits your style. Most importantly, get one that fits properly and comfortably.
 

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I had an open face and I no longer wear it since I crashed with my full face and walk out of it with a big scratch on the chin bar...
 

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i wear a full face ( bilt.. currently on sale at cycle gear).
I always remove my glasses before i put on the helmet, and then put then on through the face mask.

it can be alittle uncomfortable with a new helmet, but after awhile you'll get a little groove going and it'll fit fine
 

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I too will be buying a helmet. Want a modular with retractable visor. I wish Shoei had some, I've been told they're great helmets, but no visor. One of my buddies says I should get a Schuberth C3 but...that's $700 that's not in the budget right now.

How are the Scorpion EXO-900 "Transformers?"
 

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I've been riding in a HJC CL-SP for a good while, went down wearing one too. I highly recommend it as a cheap helmet IF, and only IF, HJC's fit you. Just made the switch to the Bell RS-1 because of the fitment issues.

The HJC never really fit, I've had both a S and a M. A medium RS-1 feels like it was made for my head!
 

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$100 helmet = $100 head.

Never scrimp on helmets.

Top of the line Agv, Shoei, or even Arai only for me.

In 1994 I smashed the chinpiece (actually cracked it) of a top of the range(back then $1000) shoei RF800 on a car.. (hit & run) smashed almost every bone in my body and snapped a new YZF 750 in half..
But I'm still here because of that Shoei.
 

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$100 helmet = $100 head.

Never scrimp on helmets.

Top of the line Agv, Shoei, or even Arai only for me.

In 1994 I smashed the chinpiece (actually cracked it) of a top of the range(back then $1000) shoei RF800 on a car.. (hit & run) smashed almost every bone in my body and snapped a new YZF 750 in half..
But I'm still here because of that Shoei.

Take that to heart, very true words.

I opted for the RS-1 (350) instead of the Star (550) because of financial issues. I was looking at Bell's new helmets because all the reviews say they flow and ungodly amount of air. Living in Texas you learn to value that sort of thing haha :D
 

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Yes I forgot to include Bell helmets in that list for the US folk.. very good apparently.

Ive a collection of AGV replicas, Rainey and Rossi ones.
Must update to the Rossi 8th title replica black one.. around $800 here in Oz.
 

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$100 helmet = $100 head.

Never scrimp on helmets.

Top of the line Agv, Shoei, or even Arai only for me.

In 1994 I smashed the chinpiece (actually cracked it) of a top of the range(back then $1000) shoei RF800 on a car.. (hit & run) smashed almost every bone in my body and snapped a new YZF 750 in half..
But I'm still here because of that Shoei.

and that is a bloody good sales pitch
 

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There is no objective scientifically-obtained evidence that more expensive helmets offer better protection than less expensive ones. (And trust me, I looked for it. If you know of any, I'd be happy to review it and change my mind if the methodology and reasoning is sound.)

A lot of people have crashed wearing an expensive helmet and claim that their injuries would have been more severe with a cheaper helmet. These claims cannot be taken as fact unless the individual repeats the crash circumstances exactly with a cheaper helmet and comes out of the ordeal with more serious injuries. This, to my knowledge, has never been done.

There is ample evidence that a full-face helmet offers much better protection than any other kind, but beyond that, there is no proof that more expensive automatically equals more protection.

Some riders ask if they should seek Snell certification in their new helmet. Although Snell demands higher impact ratings, some question this approach. The argument being that the vast majority of crashes occur at lower speeds and engineering a helmet to withstand high-velocity impacts compromises their ability to dampen low-velocity impacts as effectively. But I have no opinion one way or the other on this and wouldn't steer anyone away from a Snell-certified helmet based on this alone.

I've love for an organization like Consumer Reports to do some proper cost/protection analysis to put the issue to bed once and for all. But until then, as far as anybody knows, the differences between low- and high-end helmets come down only to fit, design, and features.

Some other random points:

Don't forget that all helmets have a 5-year life span from the time they are manufactured. After 5 or so years, the protective liner (the stuff that actually protects your head) becomes brittle and is no longer as effective at protecting your head in a crash. At 5 years old, the helmet is "used up" and should be tossed in the bin, not stored for emergencies and certainly not sold on ebay.

Do not buy a used helmet. Ever. Not because you don't want to deal with someone else's old hair grease and sweat (although that would be a valid concern), but because you have no idea how old the helmet is and what the condition of the protective liner is.

Most brands have a good warranty. I would seek a lifetime (e.g. 5-year) warranty. At least one (AFX) has a crash replacement policy where they will replace your damaged helmet for free in the event of a crash.

This site is the best I've found for motorcycle helmet reviews. They're pretty meticulous and cover fit, finish, comfort, wind noise, etc.
 

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There is no objective scientifically-obtained evidence that more expensive helmets offer better protection than less expensive ones. (And trust me, I looked for it. If you know of any, I'd be happy to review it and change my mind if the methodology and reasoning is sound.)

A lot of people have crashed wearing an expensive helmet and claim that their injuries would have been more severe with a cheaper helmet. These claims cannot be taken as fact unless the individual repeats the crash circumstances exactly with a cheaper helmet and comes out of the ordeal with more serious injuries. This, to my knowledge, has never been done.

There is ample evidence that a full-face helmet offers much better protection than any other kind, but beyond that, there is no proof that more expensive automatically equals more protection.

Some riders ask if they should seek Snell certification in their new helmet. Although Snell demands higher impact ratings, some question this approach. The argument being that the vast majority of crashes occur at lower speeds and engineering a helmet to withstand high-velocity impacts compromises their ability to dampen low-velocity impacts as effectively. But I have no opinion one way or the other on this and wouldn't steer anyone away from a Snell-certified helmet based on this alone.

I've love for an organization like Consumer Reports to do some proper cost/protection analysis to put the issue to bed once and for all. But until then, as far as anybody knows, the differences between low- and high-end helmets come down only to fit, design, and features.

Some other random points:

Don't forget that all helmets have a 5-year life span from the time they are manufactured. After 5 or so years, the protective liner (the stuff that actually protects your head) becomes brittle and is no longer as effective at protecting your head in a crash. At 5 years old, the helmet is "used up" and should be tossed in the bin, not stored for emergencies and certainly not sold on ebay.

Do not buy a used helmet. Ever. Not because you don't want to deal with someone else's old hair grease and sweat (although that would be a valid concern), but because you have no idea how old the helmet is and what the condition of the protective liner is.

Most brands have a good warranty. I would seek a lifetime (e.g. 5-year) warranty. At least one (AFX) has a crash replacement policy where they will replace your damaged helmet for free in the event of a crash.

This site is the best I've found for motorcycle helmet reviews. They're pretty meticulous and cover fit, finish, comfort, wind noise, etc.


Don't bring things like facts and logic and statistics in to this!! "methodology" psssh...long words will get you no where buster!!... Also ignore the pictures and testimonial in my link of those who have crashed with a less then expensive helmet.
-------NOTHING TO SEE HERE---
---move a long--
 

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There is no objective scientifically-obtained evidence that more expensive helmets offer better protection than less expensive ones. (And trust me, I looked for it. If you know of any, I'd be happy to review it and change my mind if the methodology and reasoning is sound.)

A lot of people have crashed wearing an expensive helmet and claim that their injuries would have been more severe with a cheaper helmet. These claims cannot be taken as fact unless the individual repeats the crash circumstances exactly with a cheaper helmet and comes out of the ordeal with more serious injuries. This, to my knowledge, has never been done.

There is ample evidence that a full-face helmet offers much better protection than any other kind, but beyond that, there is no proof that more expensive automatically equals more protection.

Some riders ask if they should seek Snell certification in their new helmet. Although Snell demands higher impact ratings, some question this approach. The argument being that the vast majority of crashes occur at lower speeds and engineering a helmet to withstand high-velocity impacts compromises their ability to dampen low-velocity impacts as effectively. But I have no opinion one way or the other on this and wouldn't steer anyone away from a Snell-certified helmet based on this alone.

I've love for an organization like Consumer Reports to do some proper cost/protection analysis to put the issue to bed once and for all. But until then, as far as anybody knows, the differences between low- and high-end helmets come down only to fit, design, and features.

Some other random points:

Don't forget that all helmets have a 5-year life span from the time they are manufactured. After 5 or so years, the protective liner (the stuff that actually protects your head) becomes brittle and is no longer as effective at protecting your head in a crash. At 5 years old, the helmet is "used up" and should be tossed in the bin, not stored for emergencies and certainly not sold on ebay.

Do not buy a used helmet. Ever. Not because you don't want to deal with someone else's old hair grease and sweat (although that would be a valid concern), but because you have no idea how old the helmet is and what the condition of the protective liner is.

Most brands have a good warranty. I would seek a lifetime (e.g. 5-year) warranty. At least one (AFX) has a crash replacement policy where they will replace your damaged helmet for free in the event of a crash.

This site is the best I've found for motorcycle helmet reviews. They're pretty meticulous and cover fit, finish, comfort, wind noise, etc.
Found this site.. so I'll post it here.

http://sharp.direct.gov.uk/home

I'd rather a Shoei XR1100 or AGV GP-Tech than an el cheapo HJC or similar thanks.

Just the feel of quality helmet is noticable right away.. let alone wind noise and how good it is years later.

Ive decided my aging Rossi AGV Q3 now needs replacing so I went helmet shopping today, prepared to spend up to $1000, and the cheap helmets didnt feel as good as this decade old one.

The better Shark helmets impressed me today but I worry about the price.. $450 seems too cheap... but I'll research them a bit, they have some good features.
 

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That's a pretty good site. But I think it confirms my stance. There are 6 helmets on the low-end as far as price goes ($100 - $150 USD or 70 - 100 GBP) with five-star ratings.
 
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