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Hey Benoy,

If its the righth hand side. Could be your oil filter cover leaking.

Regards,

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That doesn't look like a major problem.

Go around and snug down the bolts on the cover on that side with a 1/4" drive ratchet. Most likely you will find at least one bolt that isn't snug.

Don't overdo it - just snug.
 

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Is that sure?
Your oil filter cover has a metal gasket. If service departments try reuse it can leak. For like $1 i always make sure to use a new one.

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Clean entire outside of engine so all oil and dirt is gone.
Then idle bike for 5-10 minutes while watching to see where leak 1st appears.
That's area you want to examine closely.

Yeah, tightening with 1/4" torque-wrench to factory specifications is good idea. Go in criss-cross pattern.
 

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Considering how often those oil cover bolts have been broken by over tightening, I just go for "snug" with the proper size combination wrench.
 
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Except as new mechanic, you have no idea what "snug" is without some sort of feedback. I knew kid that snapped ever other case-bolt or stripped threads. Once I set him up with proper calibration on torque-wrench, he realized how his "snug" was not even close. Never broke or stripped bolt after that.
 

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There have been instances here where someone with a torque wrench has snapped bolts before hitting the "recommended" torque.

That's why I recommended a 1/4" drive ratchet. It gives you enough leverage to get bolts "snug" but not enough that you can snap them.
 

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Yup, exception not rule though. Numbers of people snapping bolts with torque-wrench is far, far out-numbered by those stripping bolts without them.

All of us probably knows someone who survived crash without helmet. But definitely doesn’t compare to numbers of those who haven’t.

There’s reason manual has numbers for everything: Size, thread and length of bolts. Size of tyres. Size of bearings. Size of pistons and thicknesses of rings. Clearances of bearings, valve clearances. Volume and weight of oils, etc. Voltages and amps to measure here and there, size of fuses and bulbs. Diameters and colour of wires, etc.

Not paying attention to numbers and improper use of low-end or miscalibrated tools aren’t really excuses to bypass all the engineering that’s gone i to these bikes.
 

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My son followed factory spec for torqueing his rear sprocket bolts - and stripped a few (wasn't there to stop him after the first) long before reaching the "correct" torque.

My concern with smaller bolts (M5, M6) on the CBR is their quality. I'm not sure that they are manufactured up to the highest level, and there have been incidents, specifically with the CBR, where they have snapped when they shouldn't have.

Learning how much is too much is part of the process, but using something like a 1/4" drive ratchet on smaller bolts does give you a certain amount of safety for stripping or snapping bolts.

I have numerous torque wrenches, and use them often, but mainly on critical chassis or engine bolts and nuts. For everything else "snug" has always been good.
 

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Yes, with lots of wrenching experience like you've got, one does develop a "calibrated" hand where you can determine how much torque is being applied.

I'm just saying for beginners without much wrenching experience, they need some feedback to learn what "snug" feels like.

Defective, worn-out bolts will snap before "snug" regardless if you're using torque-wrench or not. That's not fault of wrench or user. With experience, you learn to feel that "letting go" point where fastener doesn't increase resistance in-step with amount turned. Then you can stop and back it out before snapping. With or without a torque-wrench, beginners will go beyond snapping point because it will never reach "snug".
 

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(SNIP)
Defective, worn-out bolts will snap before "snug" regardless if you're using torque-wrench or not. That's not fault of wrench or user. With experience, you learn to feel that "letting go" point where fastener doesn't increase resistance in-step with amount turned. Then you can stop and back it out before snapping. With or without a torque-wrench, beginners will go beyond snapping point because it will never reach "snug".
That's the key to staying out of trouble!
 
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