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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How's it goin', everyone? I'm Cody! I'm really interested in the Honda CBR250r being my first motorcycle. With little to no experience on anything with two wheels and a motor (except for the occasional dirtbike, that was always in first gear lol) I figured the honda would be a good start. I spent a lot of time comparing it and the Kawasaki Ninja 250r, ultimately decided the Honda would be better for me. A little bit about me - I'm 20 years old, as of april 16th. I just moved to Austin, Texas from Phoenix, Arizona to start my life. I used to live in austin like 5-6 years ago, and decided I missed it, and moved back to room up with a friend I've known for almost 10 years. I just got hired at CVS Pharmacy, which is cool, glad to be making some money. I do have some questions about riding a Motorcycle.

Glad to be part of what seems to be a somewhat small forum community. Not surprising it's somewhat small though, the honda hasn't been out for too long. If anyone else is in the Austin area, feel free to say hey. Like I said, I just moved here, so I'm down to meet new people.

Since I do have a job now, I'm not sure how I'm going to be able to get to an MSF class. But I'm hopefully getting the bike here pretty soon for the small work commute.

Is getting the hang of driving a bike hard? I've watched hours and hours and hours and HOURS of youtube videos on driving bikes and stuff to prepare myself for whatever I can. But, I don't know that I'll be able to do the MSF class very soon - However, I WILL do it sometime in the future.
That being said, I might have to ride the bike soooooooooooooomewhat illegally just to get to work (Which is like 2-3 miles down the street, involving no highway), I don't want to be dropping my bike all the time. Which is why I'm curious of difficulty.

If you read this entire thing, thanks for taking the time out of your day.
It's nice meeting you all.

~Cody
 

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Hello and welcome :). I'm a beginner myself and the cbr250r is a great choice. The MSF courses here are offered at several different times so they may offer one that fits in your schedule. If not it's worth scheduling a couple of days off to take the class. If you don't take it before you start riding you should at least look into getting your permit instead of riding it illegally. Not sure how it works there but in AR you just have to take the written test to get your permit and it's good for 1 year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello and welcome :). I'm a beginner myself and the cbr250r is a great choice. The MSF courses here are offered at several different times so they may offer one that fits in your schedule. If not it's worth scheduling a couple of days off to take the class. If you don't take it before you start riding you should at least look into getting your permit instead of riding it illegally. Not sure how it works there but in AR you just have to take the written test to get your permit and it's good for 1 year.
Oh, interesting. How do I obtain the permit? Through the DMV? I'd prefer to take the msf course as soon as possible, and scheduling a few days of is a bit.. touchy at the moment, since I JUST got hired a few weeks ago.
 

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Oh, interesting. How do I obtain the permit? Through the DMV? I'd prefer to take the msf course as soon as possible, and scheduling a few days of is a bit.. touchy at the moment, since I JUST got hired a few weeks ago.
The course is offered on weekdays, as well as weekends...

Take the course... it addresses a few of your issues:
- You'll learn how to ride on someone *else's* bike
- You'll get your M endorsement, and won't need to ride illegally (bad path to start a new life)
- You'll most likely learn on a bike very similar to the cbr250r (or this very bike)

Good luck, and welcome...
 

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The state police give the written test here (and skills test if your getting your endorsment w/o the msf course). Just call one of your local state agencies (st. police or dmv) and they should be able to tell you what you need to do for your area to get your permit.
 

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Hi. Going from dirtbike to street bike is a bit more involving. It's not so much the operation of the bike that gets newbies; it's the nuances of riding in public that unsettles them. With that, go to the DMV and get your permit first. I don't know about your state, but CA forces you to take one half of the driver's written test in addition to motorcycle written test. Be prepared for that just in case.

That permit should let you ride on the street, except when it's dark outside, and prepare you for the classroom portion of MSF. Most MSF's have the classroom portion scheduled on one weeknight while the range portions are on weekends.
 

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Hey Cody, welcome to the club. Can't think of a better first bike than the CBR!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well, thanks for all the replies and advice, everyone. It's good to be here. I'm actually in the process of finishing up the DMV's motorcycle handbook thing for the permit. It's very good information, I'm also looking into when and where the MSF Classes are in my area. Most of them seem to be a decent distance away, and without a vehicle, it's a pain to get there by 8am every morning when It takes two hours to bus there. I do agree with whoever said riding illegally is a bad way to start, that's so true. I was actually completely unaware that there was any type of motorcycle permit available. This forum has already been a huge help to me.

Thanks again, everyone. I'll keep you guys posted on what I do in the future and WHEN I get the bike, I'll post some pictures. :p

~Cody
 

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Welcome. Shifting is not as hard as some people make it out to be. I took me 5 mins and no msf class. I got my license with a scooter the year before I bought this bike. if you have ever driven a manual car you will be able to shift gears on a bike no problem. I had a stick shift car for 7 years and the shifting works the same way except you shift a motorcycle in a linear pattern. Just think of shifting on a bike in the shape of a hand, the thumb is first (Down), neutral is between the thumb and index finger (Half click up), the index finger is first gear, middle finger is second gear and so on up to sixth gear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My buddy is actually headed to the DMV on tuesday, I believe. I'll go down there and take the written test at the same time. I just read through the motorcycle safety handbook that they recommend reading. Pretty common sense information but still useful. Hopefully that will go well so I can ride legally, once I get my bike.

Quick question though. How much am I looking at for the bike and gear total? I see that the base msrp for Honda CBR 250r is about 4100$, does that include the title and all that jazz?

I'm just looking for a general estimate - I realize that different dealerships are going to charge different amounts.
 

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Welcome. Please get your endorsement along with the MSF course. You will get started on a better road to riding without the niggling fear of getting caught by the police. You will have enough to concentrate on my friend. All the best
 

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There's a thread on here somewhere: "How much did you pay for your 250... " Do a search. It'll give you a good idea of what to expect.

Gear depends on your budget (high end to low end). Gloves, boots, helmet, jacket, at a minimum. Pricey at the beginning... (but, the gear shopping's half the fun).
 

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Take MSF before you get on the road. You should expect $4500 tops for you bike and set aside $1.5k-$2k for gear.

Get a good helmet with a pinlock(Shoei, Arai, HJC), back protector, jacket, pants, gloves and boots. Make sure your gear says A*s or Dainese (Joe Rocket is okay). Never ever leave home without it.
 

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If you're going to take it to the track, I agree with the 1.5-2k range, but for street, you can thrive on $400. My getup:

Scorpion mesh jacket with armor: $70
Tourmaster textile overpants: $70
A* SMX gauntlets: $90
Komodo full boot: $70
Scorpion EXO-700: $100

This setup gives adequate street protection and has saved my skin on a couple of spills. However, your extremities will feel cold and wet in inclement weather and those tourmasters are sweaty in hot weather (but they are awesome in the wet and they can resist abrasion really well.)

newenough.com usually has some of the most competitive prices (I just browsed and they're selling an A* one piece for $600. WOW!), but your local brick and mortar may surprise you (I got my gloves and pants from a local shop, and Komodo's ship center is nearby.) Nonetheless, go to your brick and mortar for proper fitment.
 

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If you're going to take it to the track, I agree with the 1.5-2k range, but for street, you can thrive on $400. My getup:

Scorpion mesh jacket with armor: $70
Tourmaster textile overpants: $70
A* SMX gauntlets: $90
Komodo full boot: $70
Scorpion EXO-700: $100

This setup gives adequate street protection and has saved my skin on a couple of spills. However, your extremities will feel cold and wet in inclement weather and those tourmasters are sweaty in hot weather (but they are awesome in the wet and they can resist abrasion really well.)

newenough.com usually has some of the most competitive prices (I just browsed and they're selling an A* one piece for $600. WOW!), but your local brick and mortar may surprise you (I got my gloves and pants from a local shop, and Komodo's ship center is nearby.) Nonetheless, go to your brick and mortar for proper fitment.
I would strongly advise against textile mesh, or cheaper brands that use foam as armor. Some A*s gear comes with foam, but you can buy hard upgrades. Buy LEATHER. Don't bother with textiles. When you become more serious about your riding, you'll end up buying leather anyway.
 

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While there is no argument that leather offers better protection then mesh it's also more expensive and a lot hotter in the Summer. If someone is restricted by budget or comfort levels I'd rather they purchase and USE textile/mesh then not purchase or rather purchase and not use leather.

All told I've invested about $500-$650 in my gear, and I ride year round. The only leather I've purchased are my Summer gloves and boots.
 

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Good points. Go with what you need now and in the near future, based on your location, budget, and type of riding. When I first started, I went with mostly textiles because it's bearable in the heat, fairly water-resistant, and easy to clean; a decent setup for casual riding and more protective than squid gear. Then the track bug bit and I bought a one piece leather suit, gauntlets and racing boots. If you're going to go that far, then you're better off starting with leathers and racing gear. You still have the option of renting these out at the track if it's still not in your budget, but when I go out for a spirited ride, it's always nice to have that level of protection as an option.
 

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I started out with a textile DriRider Speed jacket/Nordic pants, as I mainly commute to/from work with the CBR. I've recently purchased a set of leather RST pants and will be buying the matching leather jacket next week, also got myself a swag pair of RST boots today.

Leather is sexy. And yeah, try on different pairs, find out what feels comfortable. Don't forget that when you're standing you will have a bit of slack in the derriere/crotch region, as when you are seated this bit will stretch.
 

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While there is no argument that leather offers better protection then mesh it's also more expensive and a lot hotter in the Summer. If someone is restricted by budget or comfort levels I'd rather they purchase and USE textile/mesh then not purchase or rather purchase and not use leather.

All told I've invested about $500-$650 in my gear, and I ride year round. The only leather I've purchased are my Summer gloves and boots.
Vented leather is as cool on the move as textile mesh and MUCH safer. The only reason to wear textiles is not having enough money to afford leather. Sure, if you can't afford leather, buy textiles and start saving for leather :).
 
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