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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those who have measured their own valve clearance and adjusted shims as needed, is this a reasonable job that you would recommend to other owners or something best left to a shop?

I am asking as a potential owner who is interested in doing as much of my own maintenance as possible. I have read a few threads on this topic, including recommendations to remove the tank in order to access the valves easier. For some reason, it is important for me to be able to do most routine maintenance on any new bike I decide to purchase. I suppose it makes me feel more connected with my ride, and I can get a better sense of how everything comes together, not to mention I can spot potential minor issues before they become more important. The money isn't that important though it sure seems that motorcycle maintenance can be a lot more expensive than automobiles, at least for routine things like oil and filter changes.

My experience is limited to doing basic things on my current scooter, namely changing the oil, coolant, carburetor cleaning/breakdown, and tire changes. I haven't needed to check valves yet, but reviewing the online manual I subscribe to for my scooter makes the process look pretty painless. However, the CBR looks more difficult due to all the plastic fairings and limited access to see the valves from what I can gather.

Are there any tutorials available (youtube or other) or pictures of the process including tank removal that might dissuade me or reassure me that I can possibly do this on my own? Thanks in advance for any help or suggestions.
 

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I did mine last week, and it wasn't too bad. I would recommend having the Honda shop manual on hand for it. You have to remove the middle fairings, tank cover, gas tank, disconnect the throttle cables, disconnect the wiring harnesses and remove a couple rubber heat shields to make it easy. My valves were in spec, so I did not have to change the shims, so I can't speak to that.

None of the shops around here even have the shims for this bike, so I'd call around and check on that.
 

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I did mine last week, and it wasn't too bad. I would recommend having the Honda shop manual on hand for it. You have to remove the middle fairings, tank cover, gas tank, disconnect the throttle cables, disconnect the wiring harnesses and remove a couple rubber heat shields to make it easy. My valves were in spec, so I did not have to change the shims, so I can't speak to that.

None of the shops around here even have the shims for this bike, so I'd call around and check on that.
Roughly how long did that take you to complete?
 

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I finally decided to let honda do my valve service. The time & the risk of dropping a shim changed my mind. If it had a nut & set screw like my other hondas id do it myself.
 

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With the ABS model it is challenging, but not impossible. I recommend taking the fuel tank off because at least you can see what you are doing. That really reduces the frustration. Get a shop manual and use your torque specs because you could break bolts if you don't. I have four torque wrenches now.

If you are going to maintain your own bike you should know that most tasks are more difficult and take more time and patience than you think they should. I'm exaggerating a little, but every task requires you to remove half of the panels on the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well, I was leaning towards ABS so this is a little discouraging. On the other hand, challenging but not impossible may be right up my alley ;)

With the ABS model it is challenging, but not impossible. I recommend taking the fuel tank off because at least you can see what you are doing. That really reduces the frustration. Get a shop manual and use your torque specs because you could break bolts if you don't. I have four torque wrenches now.

If you are going to maintain your own bike you should know that most tasks are more difficult and take more time and patience than you think they should. I'm exaggerating a little, but every task requires you to remove half of the panels on the bike.
 
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