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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Here in southern England winter is well and truly upon us. That means tempratures are typically 0 to 10C (32 to 50F) with occasional dips and peaks a little below or above that range. As I ride purely for pleasure and clock up little more than 1000 miles a year I can't justify spending too much on fancy kit. However, the Alpinestars textile jacket I bought last year primarily for spring to autumn use has proved good enough to keep me comfortable for up to half an hour at 5C and resurrecting some of my many years old proper winter kit by wearing a heavy duty cycling waterproof over the top has got me a bit further. Heated grips make a big difference and I certainly would have spent on them if they hadn't been already fitted to my bike when I bought it.

As I struggle to find time to ride throughout the year I don't want to write off whole months of it so I'm keen to hear how cold you go and what kit makes it more bearable.
 

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Here in southern England winter is well and truly upon us. That means tempratures are typically 0 to 10C (32 to 50F) with occasional dips and peaks a little below or above that range. As I ride purely for pleasure and clock up little more than 1000 miles a year I can't justify spending too much on fancy kit. However, the Alpinestars textile jacket I bought last year primarily for spring to autumn use has proved good enough to keep me comfortable for up to half an hour at 5C and resurrecting some of my many years old proper winter kit by wearing a heavy duty cycling waterproof over the top has got me a bit further. Heated grips make a big difference and I certainly would have spent on them if they hadn't been already fitted to my bike when I bought it.

As I struggle to find time to ride throughout the year I don't want to write off whole months of it so I'm keen to hear how cold you go and what kit makes it more bearable.
I've been to 28F on my leetle CB; I had wool sox under my riding boots, a balaclava under my full-face helmet, an Aerostich suit, a pair of Aerostich winter gloves, and a Gerbing's heated jacket. That combination was good for my 20-minute commute at that temp, but I wouldn't want to go much longer than that.

I have used the same setup to go for long-distance rides down to around 20F . . . but that was on my Goldwing with its [email protected] windshield, fairing lowers, and heated grips. The heated grips helped, but it's the windshield and lowers that made the biggest difference, I'm pretty sure . . . .
 

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I hunted when I lived in Montana, so for winter riding I use heavy wool pants with thermal underwear and Soral pacs (boots with felt liners) with winter socks. I have warm mittens for truly cold conditions/longer rides, but have usually gotten by with insulated riding gloves in my 15 minute morning ride ride to where I volunteer.

This area is pretty arid so if there isn't ice on the ground I usually ride. The coldest temp that I have ridden in Arizona is 17F (-9.4C). When I was much younger, and invincible, I rode to college in Evanston, Illinois, all winter, so I probably rode there down to roughly -19C; that was a fairly short trip as well.
 

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We ride when it's cold. I guess I think snowmobile gear. We go out when it's down to -5C, no colder than that. Probably would do no more than 1 hour of pleasure riding on local roads. Roads have to be clean and mostly free of sand and ice meaning no recent storms.
 

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I used to ride all winter here in the Northeast, as long as there was no snow or ice on the road. The two most important articles of gear that made it possible for me were a thick LEATHER jacket and a silk balaclava under the helmet. Even though that balaclava seemed thin and flimsy, it made a huge difference in keeping my head and neck warm. I think a lot of it could have been psychological, but it worked. And nothing stops cold air like real leather.
My step-father, who used to ride an old Indian Scout with a sidecar in snow and ice during the winter thought I was a wimp and would regale me regularly about how his "cold weather gear" consisted of stuffing old newspapers down the front of his jacket.
Now that I no longer have to commute on a bike and ride only for recreation, I really AM a wimp and start shivering at the mere thought of any temperatures south of 55F....LOL.
"Shivering" is actually a big danger when riding in the cold. If you're shivering uncontrollably, you're being majorly distracted from focusing on your riding.
 

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Depends. We ride dirt bikes in weather close to 0F -







On the street, I've ridden into the low 40F/high 30F range, but after a while it's the hands that are the problem. I have winter riding gloves, but they only keep you warm for a limited time. heated gear or grips is the way to go if you are serious.

I wouldn't ride my street bike if the temps were low enough to freeze water on the road. Dropping a dirt bike is one thing, but dropping a street bike is something else.
 

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Yup, even here in sunny southern Arizona:

 

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Discussion Starter #8
The above two posts have reminded me of the time I went green-laning on a very frosty day on a KLX250. For a couple of hours off road topping out at 25mph, breaking the ice on puddles and all the body movement that goes with riding off road I was toasty warm, yet when it came to a tarmac section to get back to the van I could feel the cold getting through in minutes.
 

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I've ridden down to 14 Fahrenheit on my 40 minute commute at 55-65MPH. Not too fun, but managed just fine with my jeans under my textile riding pants, Thinsulate leather gauntlets, a wool scarf, and my Scorpion Exo jacket with the quilted liner installed. Add my Vietnam boots, and my feet were fine. My fingers did get quite cold about halfway to and from, but nothing incredibly uncomfortable. Any longer or any colder and muffs and/or heated gloves/grips would have been necessary.

I ride in the winter for the commute; nothing fun about the cold for me. Then again, there's nothing fun about the sweltering summers here either.
 

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dont knock kiwi's step-fathers newspaper down front..
whatever else you wear,, its cheap, easy, recyclable
and actually works as torso insulation..
[not a few sheets, the full sydney morning herald]

woolen scarf closing off helmet to jacket
works as well.. as does attitude..
 

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The most vulnerable to the cold (imo) are hands, arms/shoulders, and torso.

I'm a big believer in heated grips, heated glove liners, and a heated jacket liner. I will ride down to any temperature so long as I don't expect ice/black ice on the roadway.
 

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The big problem with heated grips is that they heat the wrong side of your hands.
When I commuted on my sidecar rig for five winters, I had heated grips, handlebar muffs, and a old, ugly handlebar mounted fairing. Plus a snowmobile suit, and a heated vest.

This is always fun, guess what this is/used for:

 

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dont knock kiwi's step-fathers newspaper down front..
whatever else you wear,, its cheap, easy, recyclable
and actually works as torso insulation..
[not a few sheets, the full sydney morning herald]

woolen scarf closing off helmet to jacket
works as well.. as does attitude..
Newspaper - a decades-old solution. Long before my time, that is for sure.

I have a leather bandana for my throat. It is from this company, but this one may be a little larger. Other companies make similar ones in a variety of configurations. I would not own a motorcycle without having one of these.

https://www.wilsonsleather.com/product/shaf-leather-face-mask-w--micro-fleece-lining.do?sortby=ourPicksAscend&page=2&from=fn

This one looks real good:
https://www.amazon.com/Shaf-International-Leather-Warmer-Medium/dp/B00IWHJTO6
 

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The big problem with heated grips is that they heat the wrong side of your hands.
When I commuted on my sidecar rig for five winters, I had heated grips, handlebar muffs, and a old, ugly handlebar mounted fairing. Plus a snowmobile suit, and a heated vest.

This is always fun, guess what this is/used for:

Blowing your warm breath down your jacket to heat you up. :grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Maybe most of us just aren't trying hard enough. This was my lunchtime viewing today.........
 

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Discussion Starter #19
That looks like a blast!

I'd never ride a bike that size though. Because speeds are low, I would think you could get away with a 250 enduro - which would be a lot more manageable (and more fun IMO).
My thoughts exactly.
 

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I used to ride my cbr every day to commute to work. Nowadays I work from home. I didn't ride on any day that was under about 39 degrees F. Reason being is that black ice someone else mentioned. Plus the discomfort! I had a 45 minute drive one way and did ok with a good gloves, a thermal shirt, insulated jacket and boots and a balaclava. Freeze-Out is great stuff!
 
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