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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Before I get started, I'll throw this out: I know there are pros and cons to doing this, and more pros and cons to doing it the way I did it. It affects high speed cornering. It affects ground clearance. It affects suspension travel. It affects all sorts of things. Bottom line for me: It's my wifes bike, and it's critical that she's absolutely comfortable riding it, and it's about as far from a performance bike as you can get, so most of these issues are pretty moot. She's only 5', so saying "just get used to it" isn't really working out.

This thread is not about all that. This thread is just about how I did it.

1. Installed a fully adjustable lowering link for the rear from Soupy's. CBR250R Lowering Kit, CBR250 Lowering Kit, CBR250R Lowering Link, CBR250R Lowering Links, CBR250R Adjustable Kickstand, CBR250R Lowering Sidestand, CBR250R Shorter Kickstand



It comes with directions and it's pretty simple. I took about 2" off the back. So, moving on to the front.

2. Lift the front of the bike. I put mine on a rear stand and used a ratchet strap to lift the front.



Make sure you get the weight off the front tire, or the insides of the forks will jump out at you in the next step.

3. Remove fork top caps. 17mm, I think.



There will be a little bit of spring tension on the bottom of these, nothing to worry about.

4. Remove the spacers.



5. Cut the spacers.




I was aiming for half an inch, but I butchered the first cut trying to do it fast and wound up taking .569 off both to make 'em even.

6. Clean 'em up and put 'em back in. We're all done here.

The plan was to do this and do the rest by raising the forks through the triples, to split the difference on negative performance effects, but this pretty much lowered it enough to match the back.



One down side: Kick stand is now too long. I'm going to ask one of my neighbors to cut it down for me next time I see him, or take it to work and do it. Soupy's has an adjustable kickstand, but it's pretty expensive.

I would recommend cutting the spacers in small increments if you do this - maybe .2 inch at a time, see what you end up with. Easier to grind them down with a 120 grit flapper wheel or something than it is to cut it and get it right; it's pretty soft metal.

At the end of the day, if she wants it back to stock, this is easily reversible by making new spacers out of PVC or something, and soupy's link adjusts all the way to stock height.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
+1

one question though, what would be the difference between cutting the spacers or sliding forks through triple clamps to lower the front.
A little more info: cutting the spacers will make your suspension squishier, sliding the forks up will making the bike ...more responsive? Squirrely? in high speed turns.

Like I said, my intention was to split the difference between cutting the spacers and moving the forks, but I overshot it on the spacers. Probably better off that way for her - she weights about 95lbs, so lighter suspension probably wont hurt.
 

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Great tutorial; I have the Soupy's link on the table in front of me now.

How did the cut and re-welded sidestand hold up? My Yamaha sidestand is made of potmetal and can't be welded. Is the Honda better quality and capable of being welded?

Also, why not make new spacers first out of PVC, saving the stockers if you want to restore it to factory height?

Any wobble, dive, bounce, wallow etc. with the softer front suspension?

Thanks,

Will
 
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