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Braking seems pretty simple on the surface: squeeze the lever and the bike slows down. You might have heard the old adage, "Fast riders have slow hands." If you take an MSF course, they'll tell you not to grab the brake lever and instead squeeze it slowly, but they never really offer an explanation. I don't know about you, but I've always had a hard time doing just what I'm told without being told why. Maybe you keep crashing your bike because no one has taken the time to explain exactly why a gentle approach with the brake lever is a good plan. Or maybe you're an experienced rider who has figured out braking intuitively, but would like to know more about the nuts and bolts. Understanding what squeezing the lever does, how braking is affected by your suspension, and how to be smart about braking by being aware of your surroundings will make you a more skilled rider who can avoid accidents.
Continue for to Jalopnik for more braking tips! we should all be more aware and know of our limits of how to break, but the best i would say is just go through a MSFcourse as it would be best, and more technical on at that.
 

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An interesting article, but I feel gets too bogged down with technicalities. This is the most important point (from the article) I reckon anyway:

using the brakes is really a lot less about the technical skill needed to operate the lever and more about using your eyes and consciously picking where you want to go, when you want to slow down and when you'd like to stop. If you can do that then you'll probably never have a problem with grabbing at the lever and locking the front wheel.

.... even in an emergency..... Look where you want to go, not at what you want to avoid. There is another thread looking at this idea.

As to the concept of "squeezing" rather than "grabbing" the brake, it is not something I had ever really thought about before..... but then realised that is something that came naturally from my formative years. Riding on farms, with varying, less than ideal surfaces a rider soon learns to "feel" his or her way into braking rather than just hitting the anchors.

I would recommend that any beginner take the opportunity to do some off road riding if they can. You can learn a lot at relatively low speed, so inevitable spills are not likely to result in serious injury.
 

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good write up thanks Micheal for the summary.

ideally its like a car... don't "slam" the brakes gradually step on them! low speeds are the best speeds to learn anything or train you could say.
 
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