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Discussion Starter #1
Guys
How do I improve the brakes (especially the front)? If any of you've ridden a Ninja 250R, you know what I mean. How do I get rid of the sponginess & get a razor sharp + confident front braking?

I've tried...
- Cleaning the caliper kit
- lubing the floating calipers
- Cleaning the top piston at the lever
- Removed air lock from the assembly
- Cleaned the disc

But still no avail; they not only remain spongy, but also has lot of play in it; we were able to bring down the play with additional washer, but the quality of braking needs to be improved to a large quality.

Pls guide. Thanks.
 

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Larger rotor/caliper/pads, maybe? I've not heard too many people complain about the CBR250's brakes unless they planned to race the bike. I thought I read that steel braided brakelines made a noticeable albeit not tremendous difference.
 

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A steel braided front line is all I can think of that would improve the brakes that come with the bike.
A braided line won't swell & expand under hard braking so you get a better, more consistent, progressive feel.

If you use the rear brake a lot, a braided line there could help too. I personally like my rear brake on the weak side and so I don't think a braided line is a must there but I do plan on getting a braided line for my front eventually.
 

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I think the brakes are set up on the smooth side to help from being too grabby when ABS cuts in on the bikes that have it. Especially the rear which basically does little more than to be a hill holder. I have seen after market pads available which may offer more power. Too bad the conversion rates make everything from sellers in Japan overpriced.
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SBS : Street excel sinter [777-0881030]
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http://japan.webike.net/products/3455195.html
 

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I've used a steel braided line in front and though there is improvement, it's not a very BIG improvement. The line used was a transplant off another bike (where there really was a very big improvement), so I'm sure that it is not an issue with the line expanding/not giving the advantages of a braided line. It's a bit long so I'm fabricating a teflon line with SS braiding but that may take a bit of time.

@ sendler: Indian bikers cannot use aftermarket pads used in UK/USA/elsewhere. That's because the brakes are BYBRE units, and the pads are a different size (slightly larger) than the pads used in the Non ABS CBR elsewhere, which, I think, use Nissin units (not sure about that though). I'd imported a pair of Galfer pads - they did not fit. It's not that I'm unhappy with the braking, on my bike I feel it is more than adequate, but a braided line and better pads are a comparatively cheap upgrade that can give a much better feel when the brakes are used hard.

@ Aargee: You can look up the yellow pages to contact workshops who actually make custom made hoses - the drawbacks being that your original hose will have to be sent as a sample as the two banjo bolts have to be oriented precisely with regards to each other, and being a single piece, don't expect anybody to put you at the top of the pile as far as the execution of the work is concerned.
 

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The ABS model has quite good brakes and a nice caliper, thats why I got that model.
Braided line and the right pads would be nice but I'll wear out the stock ones first.

I wipe my discs with Acetone from new and after cleaning the bike to get rid of any assembly grease, grime, detergents, wd40 or polish etc before the pads become impregnated with it and the disc glazes.
 

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HH Sintered pads.

Do a search if you have a non ABS model I have a full write up on them.

Stock brake pads were not HH sintered items in AU
 

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Size difference between the Indian stock pads (Bybre) and the Galfer units (or whatever units are used in CBR250Rs sold worldwide)
 

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It sounds like there still is a bit of air in the line...probably up around the banjo bolt. Try kneeling down beside the caliper. Put your other knee against the caliper. While holding the wheel so the forks can't turn, press hard on the caliper with your knee until the brake piston is fully compressed. Then pump the brake lever in short strokes (maybe 1/2") until the lever is firm again. Do this a couple of times. It will often times force any air bubbles up into the reservoir.
Another thing....squeeze the brake lever hard, then wrap a strong elastic or bungee cord around the lever and handlebar to hold that pressure on the brake. Leave it on overnight. It may force the air into the reservoir.
If that all fails, you might want to buy one of these.
Mityvac Brake and Clutch Bleeding Equipment
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Guys eil, MetalStorm, Sendler, Arn, Aufitt, Macca, hondafan - I'm bang sure there's no air right from master cylinder to drain bolt of caliper kit. And hoses...I don't think makes any difference, probably it can increase the pressure, but I tend (TEND) to think its the grip that matters.

Since I've a standard one (not the ABS) which is made of Brembo + KBX in India unlike ABS which is Nissin that has 3 pot compared to 2 pot of Brembo that makes hell a lot of difference in braking.

That's why I said at the very first step, IF YOU'VE RIDDEN A N250R;

Anyway, I don't mind spending money to get expensive pads as long as it serves what I need; after all safety takes more priority than expense; also I'm in no mood to make custom fitting parts as I understand it not only affects the warranty, but remaking it in the middle of nowhere (sometimes) is real pain in the butt. If an after market part is made to perfectly suit a stock, then that's the one I'm looking at.

Once again, Tks Guys - eil, MetalStorm, Sendler, Arn, Aufitt, Macca, hondafan for your suggestions.
 

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@Aargee - I just got back from a 1100km road trip across East Java: open roads, heavy traffic, winding country roads, slippery rainy and steep roads, long stretches with suddenly changing conditions, crazy buses and trucks suddenly swinging out at you etc.

Though I wasn't riding two up, my bike was pretty heavily laden with gear and stuff (here on the ferry across the straits to Bali and back, and also a sample of the mountain roads in the rain).

No complaints about the ABS. Saved my butt a couple of times!
 

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@Aargee - I just got back from a 1100km road trip across East Java: open roads, heavy traffic, winding country roads, slippery rainy and steep roads, long stretches with suddenly changing conditions, crazy buses and trucks suddenly swinging out at you etc.

Though I wasn't riding two up, my bike was pretty heavily laden with gear and stuff (here on the ferry across the straits to Bali and back, and also a sample of the mountain roads in the rain).

No complaints about the ABS. Saved my butt a couple of times!
Great pics of the roads in Java. Small motorcycles are the perfect way to get around for people that are fit enough to ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I've a standard model not ABS; ABS owner's in India haven't complained anything about the front brakes; did I say earlier that ABS has 3 pot caliper compared to 2 pot in standard?

If I'm left with no option, should I switch to ABS caliper assy & close the inlet that is fed from the rear?
 

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I think perhaps you should borrow somebody's N250 master cylinder assembly and see whether it makes a difference, before you spend money on a new ABS caliper assembly.
 

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I like the HH sintered pads.

They are heaps more noisy than the stock pads.

They have just that little more bite and grip in them, Was worth the $50ish I paid for them.

Easy to swap out as well.
 

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Actually I have the non-ABS too and find the brakes to be excellent. They have more than enough bite (obviously they do as you could still do nose wheelies...) but the softness gives me personally a very good feeling for how much you can apply the brakes without locking up your front wheel. Makes breaking feel much safer to me.

PS: I rode the ABS model before I bought mine, but honestly I didn't feel a real difference in terms of bite. So either I tested a bad ABS model, got a very good non-ABS model or there is not much difference
 

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Spongy brakes are generally a result of air in the line. Brakes requiring excessive pressure, is usually a result of a bad master cylinder to caliper ratio, or insufficient pad or disc area. IMHO opinion, using a 3 piston abs caliper on a bike with standard brakes would be an improvement. But you would need to run a hydraulic line to the middle piston from the main brake line. This would give you 3 operating pistons from the front brake lever and reduce the amount of pressure required to achieve a given braking force. But if there is air in the line, you will still have a sponginess.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I thought HH Sinisters were available only for ABS models & not STD; BTW, STD & ABS brake pads differ & I hope you're aware of it
 
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