Honda CBR 250 Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
480 Posts
You can put in gear and roll bike backwards to tighten upper run of chain. Then measure distance between 24 pins. Brand new-chain measures to exactly 15". Wear limit is 15-3/32". If it measures more than that between 24 pins, time to replace.
 

·
Registered
Honda: INNOVA125i(2010); CBR250R(2013)
Joined
·
638 Posts
Hi all!

I was planning to clean and lube my chain when I noticed that the chain looks very loose and I think at the end of it's life:


Also, I bought this 108 link chain in 2016 and I think it's good.

Can I have your thoughts?

Thanks!
Hey, you bought a good chain, at reasonable price too.
The easiest way to spot a chain that has ended its life is to do slack test: Turn the wheel to a few different points, and if the slack is not uniform at such a level that it is no longer possible to get the allowed slack range (20-30mm), it's time to replace it. And it is possible to pre-replace even when not exceeding the allowable slack range, in order to maintain the uniformity of the power transmission, etc.
From the picture you took, this one:
Motor vehicle Automotive tire Bumper Vehicle Vehicle registration plate

From your "ruler", yes, even from the "ruler" you can see that it is time to replace the chain.

To replace a chain you will need a special tool that pulls out the penis (Breaks the chain), and then crushes the new pins into place. You already have such a tool? Do you have previous experience working with a similar tool?

My Tip1: It is always worth **checking on this occasion what is the condition of the slider Part no': 52170-KYJ-900 (Link to Partzilla)
**At the OWNER'S MANUAL P.66
Font Publication Poster Parallel Paper

Tip 2: What is the condition of the gears(Front & Rear)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Happy Friday!!

From your "ruler", yes, even from the "ruler" you can see that it is time to replace the chain.
Ok, you're right, it's clearly time to replace. I bought the same chain and it will arrive today, thanks.

To replace a chain you will need a special tool that pulls out the penis (Breaks the chain), and then crushes the new pins into place. You already have such a tool? Do you have previous experience working with a similar tool?
is the word really penis? I've chaged two chains before, the first time using a cheap dirt bike chain that actually broke on me at a slow speed thank god 🙄 and then the second time with this current chain. I used some kind of saw to brake the old chain and then I used this mini chain press tool to put the new one on:

Font Plant Tree Airplane Paper



My Tip1: It is always worth **checking on this occasion what is the condition of the slider Part no': 52170-KYJ-900 (Link to Partzilla)
**At the OWNER'S MANUAL P.66 [/QUOTE]

thanks, I've never thought of doing this.

Tip 2: What is the condition of the gears(Front & Rear)?[/QUOTE]

I have a spare front sprocket and haven't checked the gears at all yet to see if the teeth are worn.


I think ultimately I have too much work to do that I feel comfortable with and it's been a while since I had a tune up. When I get my chain in, I'll have a repair shop do everything.

Thanks everyone!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,171 Posts
You will want all new sprockets as well.

A worn sprocket will put additional stress on the new chain, and make it wear much quicker. It may also cause additional noise and a "jumping" as you spin the wheel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You will want all new sprockets as well.

A worn sprocket will put additional stress on the new chain, and make it wear much quicker. It may also cause additional noise and a "jumping" as you spin the wheel.
Thanks. The shop ordered me new sprockets and will replace my chain and sprockets.

They said my slider was fine (from the earlier post).
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top