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Discussion Starter #1
I was very anxious to get mine when I joined this forum. Was about an eight week wait back then. Twelve weeks later I hear at Thanksgiving (not celebrated here) it will be delayed again, from "segunda semana" of Dec, to "primer parte de" January. The grand, sudden season change happened 6 days ago and now the weather is that promised in the brochures, and I'm at least another month away. Make it 7 or 8 weeks because the Tico Time factor means January 25 or so.

For eight weeks the M4 SS sits here with my parts/procedure to tone it down half way and deepen it's throat. Yoshimura fender eliminator on the shelf for six weeks. (The installation instructions did not look so bad to me.) Cool Shoei helmets for wifey and me look from the website to have become last year's graphics before they saw daylight. And a lot of threads have run their course here.

Enthusiasm has waned off in the thought that pretty soon some equally cool or even better small-displacement (meaning less than $12,000 here which means a 250) importable model may just come along.

You longer-timers riding (or wintering, nyuk nyuk :p) have any regrets, wish you would have waited? Or should I keep the faith?
 

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I waited 3 months for a Black ABS, glad I did because summer is here and I'm racking up the K's, and off to the track in 2 weeks... ok I'm gloating :)
 

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no regret here..theres always going to be a new model eventually. I waited for almost 2 months with a deposit at one dealership, and eventually took my buisness to a different dealer..sounds like you might not have that luxury of just getting your money back amd going else where, but my new scorpion helmet, gloves, and brand new joe rocket jacket sat in the closet while i too almost daily got on the internet and drooled over my first new bike to be..it was disheartening sometimes during the wait but when i finally arrived at the new dealer and saw the bike, the wait was well worth it..no regrets here..keep the faith no matter what you choose..and yes winter is tightening its grip, although i did ride a few miles today sunny and 45 degrees..
 

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There hasn't been a "still waiting" thread since the CBR250R became available in the USA. I never did really understand them. When I have needed a motorcycle I have bought whatever was available that suited my needs and my budget.

Personally my main interest in the CBR250R is that I am pleased that the quarter litre class is being taken seriously again by manufacturers. To me it is the sweet spot of being reasonably practical and economical, with a useful turn of performance.

In some parts (particularly USA) it seems to be seen as a beginner bike. In others (India & Thailand) it is a relatively affordable bigger bike than is the norm.

If you want, or need a motorcycle, don't wait; just buy one.
 

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Sluggo, if I had waited longer, I would have taken the tri-color. If a naked 250 single shows up, I may just off this one for less bodywork. A 1/4 fairing is the most I am really interested in. Functionally the CBR1/4 is great, no functional complaints. It is really enjoyable to ride.

Yes Michael, I agree, but if you want or need a quarter liter, single and make your choice of the available options in this class, you just might have to wait.
But if you know nothing other than you want a bike, anything will do.
 

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I guess if you wait long enough, you can talk yourself out of buying or doing anything. There is always something bigger and better, especially with technology. So sometimes you just have to live in the moment and splurge on something you really like.

No regret, what so ever, with my purchase. I had follow the CBR250R since the news broke and read all the reviews and comparisons. Once I had my finances figured out and the right opportunity came away, I pulled the trigger without thinking twice. Now in my garage, I have great bike to compliment my other love.
 

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If this is the bike you want then, I say wait. If you're open to a variety of bikes then continue to shop around. If you plan on keeping the bike for several years choose a bike that you are drawn to....looks, specs, style etc. Buying a bike that you "settle" for may end up being a disappointment. I waited for mine to arrive for four months and have'nt regreted the wait but, then again, it was during winter lol:D The wait is frustrating however when riding season is ticking by and you're not on the road.:(
 

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Is it worth the wait? Sounds like my buddy, who married a Tica and has been trying to get Costa Rican citizenship for 4 years. Still has to go cool his heals in Nicaragua for - what is it - 72 hours every 30 days or something - before he can come back in. Guess you folks are getting too many economic refugees from the US these days.....anywho here in California we're lucky; the wait is never more than a few weeks unless you just have to have ABS. I'd have waited longer; there really are no comparable bikes at this time. Most of the other 250's are carburated 18 hp jobs.
 

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The more I ride the more I wish I had gone with a KLR650 (dualsport). I am finding myself wanting to go to more and more places out of the way and wanting more and more gas to make those trips.

I am happy with the bike for the fuel efficiency, and it is very comfortable to ride longer distances. I will be riding it all the way through the winter (mid teens low twenties).

I say forget waiting. It is a bike, not a stellar bike, just a bike. Pick up a similar bike if you want, but don't waste time not riding when you could be riding because you want a particular cheap 250.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Thanks for all the opinions and advice. Every response is in its own way dead-on correct including the fact that Aufitt's a gloater! :)

"Cheap 250" no hay. Here even the antiquated XT250 is $7,500 territory and that price is really the only bridge between the sea of Chinese crap (get tissues ready for tears of laughter and click here) selling for $2-4K, and the bikes for los ricos (anything real, Kawi Versys and up) for $17,000 to infinity. Everything car or bike is two times US price while wages are 1/3, so it's a real rich-man poor-man thing. Sportster rider means rich person. From the price I agreed to, the 250R comes in at only 1.7 times US price thanks to non-Japan manufacture.

Ideally my choice is the F800ST. Still (just) light enough to pull the needed majority of the street shenanigans you want to do here in daily commute, yet with friendlier "lets go to Samara or Nicaragua this weekend" demeanor. Cost in the US about $10,800, here the only dealer in the country quotes $20,000. So, $7K Honda or $20K BMW...

Hey Pete, the 90 days have-to-cross-the-border-for-3-days-to-renew-visa is correct. If your buddy would like a job here now even before residency established and he lives in the central valley, PM me.
 

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TEverything car or bike is two times US price while wages are 1/3, so it's a real rich-man poor-man thing. Sportster rider means rich person.
Speaking as a resident of the SF Bay Area - at least in Costa Rica you don't have to be rich to own a decent house even if you can't have that Sportser! Unless things have changed since I was there in the 90's. I think I'd take your economic headaches over ours.

Hey Pete, the 90 days have-to-cross-the-border-for-3-days-to-renew-visa is correct. If your buddy would like a job here now even before residency established and he lives in the central valley, PM me.
Actually he does OK working as a guide - he's good at it and gets some high dollar tips for getting those rarities onto people's life lists. I think part of the problem is that he comes up here part of the year to do landscaping jobs. One year he lucked into some great gigs - "stay in our guest house while you landscape our 5 acres - how does 30k for the job sound" - that sort of thing and he was out of the country for more than six months. That loused up the process some or so I understand.
 

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i live in Israel and waited almost half year to receive 2 X CBR250ABS TRI COLOR
in my country every cbr costs 10300$ + 810$ABS i got discount for buying 2 of them for 21621$.
i very happy with this bike its little machine which make every head on the street to look at me :)
and even for my wight 130KG its doing great job i even managed to push it to 150 KPH
 

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You have the option of buying a used ninja 250cc. In addition to my other bikes, I have an 07 ex250 . I paid $1300 for a bike that does not look as nice as a new CBR but has more or less the same performance -Less low end torque - more high end power- It is also much more comfortable compared to the CBR I sat on.

After many years of riding.. your perspective changes.. I find that many new riders get bored of their 250cc bikes very quickly.. While many seasoned riders will enjoy owing a 250 again because they seem them from a completely different perspective. Seasoned riders already know a 250 is not going to give them a huge kick in the pants.. That's not what they are looking for.. on the other hand many new riders are looking for a kick in the pants- hence the sale of their 250cc bikes a year after they bought them.
It depends on where you are in life. That's why I never suggest buying a brand new 250cc bike to a new rider. It often turns out to be a very poor financial decision.
 

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I bought the 250 for my first bike, and don't get me wrong I have eyes on the next class. However, I am totally fine with what I've got for 3-5 years just til I learn how to ride it VERY WELL. I don't see this as a poor financial decision at all. It's a great asset to have.

I am debating whether I'll keep this bike or not when the time comes for another bike. I doubt i'll justify keeping 2 bikes at this point, but life changes and my opinion might as well.

If/When I go to sell it I'll probably be out a little bit of $, but it'll be a nice amount towards the next bike. The cool thing with the money spent on this bike is that it provides REAL value as transportation. Its not just a toy even though it can be a lot of fun!
 

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I bought the 250 for my first bike, and don't get me wrong I have eyes on the next class. However, I am totally fine with what I've got for 3-5 years just til I learn how to ride it VERY WELL. I don't see this as a poor financial decision at all. It's a great asset to have.
OK, Read what I wrote again. I said it often (not always) ends up being a poor financial decision for new riders who sell their brand new motorcycles after a year to upgrade to a bigger bike.
 

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The more I ride the more I wish I had gone with a KLR650 (dualsport). I am finding myself wanting to go to more and more places out of the way and wanting more and more gas to make those trips.

I am happy with the bike for the fuel efficiency, and it is very comfortable to ride longer distances. I will be riding it all the way through the winter (mid teens low twenties).

I say forget waiting. It is a bike, not a stellar bike, just a bike. Pick up a similar bike if you want, but don't waste time not riding when you could be riding because you want a particular cheap 250.
I have several friends with KLR650s. The drawback to the KLR is that it is a huge pig in terms of weight (a whopping 431 lbs wet). About 70 lbs more than the CBR250R. So it really sucks for exploring tight and technical trails. It is fine for exploring fire roads, and is well suited for longer highway jaunts. It is also carburated - nothing more needs to be said there.

But everything is a compromise. I have a WR250R that is relatively lightweight (about 130 lbs lighter than the KLR650!!!!) so it is excellent for exploring tight trails and slower technical trail riding. However, it is just "O.K." for riding on the highway for most people. But I find it more than adequate for highway use. In the end - I felt the WR250R was a better highway bike than the KLR650 was a trail bike - so I went with the WR250R.

Mike
 

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Klr650

My brother has a KLR650. They have quite a bit of suspension travel. That bike sits so high! Talk about getting blown around like a parachute on the highway. We have nearly the same commute. I have ridden to work on the highway 100 times this year. He used his bike 5. The CBR250R is a dart on the highway. The KLR650, not so much.
 

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My brother has a KLR650. They have quite a bit of suspension travel. That bike sits so high! Talk about getting blown around like a parachute on the highway. We have nearly the same commute. I have ridden to work on the highway 100 times this year. He used his bike 5. The CBR250R is a dart on the highway. The KLR650, not so much.
True. The WR250R has a tall seat height too (36.5"). When I first jumped on it - I couldn't touch even with my toes extended on either side. I've since done a few mods (1" lower aftermarket seat, linkage mod, and aftermarket lowering link) that make the seat height easier to live with.

And I also purchased an aftermarket windscreen from Cee Bailey's. The WR250R definitely gets pushed around by the wind more than the CBR250R.

Mike
 
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