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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey my name is Van hailing from Barrie, Ontario. Im new to this forum, im about to purchase a 2012 Honda CBR250RA. I think this is the perfect bike for me to start with; im just hoping i can get any input before i do make the purchase; tips, what not to do, anything i should buy...may it be warranty, gear, accessories, etc. Im happy to be here and cant wait for some responses. Thank you.
 

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:)And you came here?

Everyone's tips will be a little different. Mine would be:

  • Take the MSF course.
  • Practice initially in low traffic conditions.
  • Always look 12 seconds ahead (i.e. where you will be in 12 seconds).
  • Buy some gear. Wear it.
  • Never ride when you have drugs or alcohol in your system.
  • Assume that the driver of every car you meet wants to kill you.
  • Have a ball.
Oh - and welcome to CBR250.net!
 

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always ride with ALL your gear, ALL the time.

take some lessons/MSF training and practice , practice , practice.

Welcome to the site.
 

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Coming from another new rider, your already giving yourself an advantage by starting on an appropriatly sized bike, now just continue that pattern by taking an MSF course before you try to ride. Get all your gear and use it. And make sure you get a helmet that actually fits....there are a few different head shapes they are made in so try as many different brands/models on that you can find to make sure you find the shape that fits you best. It should be nice and snug around your head and the cheekpads should squish your cheeks in somewhat. Walk around in the store with it on for around 10 minutes to make sure it doesn't start making your head hurt after wearing it a while. If it does it's either too small or it's the wrong shape for your head.
 

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From one new Ontario ( Whitby ) driver to another , welcome !

I am in the exact same boat as you , in fact I just had my 2012 CBR 250 with ABS dropped off today :D

As mentioned I to would also recommend taking the motercycle course as well , my class starts June 8 TH

When at the dealership see if you can get them to throw in the trickle charger and bike cover for free , can't hurt to try . Unfortunately I didn't think of it until after I got home , as I was to excited about the bike .

I think you will love the bike , I have been sitting here starting at mine for an hour now :)
Mix that in with practicing on the clutch I have been having a ball : P

Please keep us posted on how things develop !
 

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I was in the same position you are a couple months ago. I have a friend that lent me his crappy motorcycle and I had tons of gravel and dirt roads to practice on. I joined this forum( followed for like 2 months before I joined) and read a lot about riding and about this bike. I bought my cbr last weekend with abs and I have my safety course this weekend. The first thing I did after about 2 trips on the motorcycle to make sure I could enjoy it was buy riding gear. (since here you have to have it for the msf course anyways). Definitely wear the gear all the time. I have accepted eventually I will biff it and when I do I will depend on my gear not my skin to protect me. It took me about a week of riding before I started to enjoy and the fear wore off. Now its just a blast. I do it every day after work. After this weekend I can finally hit the pavements. If you dont have the "luxury" of lightly monitored low traffic gravel roads. Get your permit and get a friend with a bike and go ride around a parking lot. Motorcycle riding isnt for everyone. Definitely make sure its for you before you drop 4k or more on a bike. I definitely recommend the ABS model for beginners.
 

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Welcome to the group (to which I am also new) and to riding (to which I'm not new).

This bike will be a great starter and much, much more. It's quite easy to launch, light and easy to maneuver, and has plenty of power for a really good time!
Like Luke said, you'll hear lots of different things from the group; some of us might even disagree with each other about our advice/opinions.

Take a rider course if at all possible; it seems expensive, but it's WAY worth it.

Buy gear that fits you well. You want to be fairly comfortable; the last thing you want to be doing while riding is fidgeting with your clothing, helmet, etc.

Try on helmets from several different makers. They'll have different shapes. I have a Shoei-shaped head; other helmets (very nice, high-dollar jobs) don't fit my head at all. You might have an Arai-shaped head. Everyone will have their favorite, but what fits your head best is what you should get (501CBR's tips on trying them on are sound). Things like how quiet, lightweight, or ventilated it is are nice (and sometimes pricey), but fit is top priority. Don't be afraid to spend plenty of money on a helmet, as it is without doubt the most important piece of gear you will buy. Get one with more of the nicer features if it makes you happier. Get the one you like the most that you can afford and, again, that fits you best.

Wear ear protection on trips longer than 10-15 minutes at speeds above 40 (or all the time once you get plenty of experience under your belt and don't feel a need to hear every little sound around you). Howard Leight MAX-1 NRR33 are great.

Don't be afraid to rev the engine more than you think you should. Use your clutch to control takeoffs and speed in slow turns, etc. Better to rev the engine more than to bog it down, stall it, etc.

Don't look car drivers eye to eye and think that they actually see you and are going to yield to you. Sure, look at their faces to get an idea of their intentions, but watch their front wheels for rotation (especially stopped cars at intersections, etc.).

Enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Awesome advise!!

Hey guys thanks for all the advise and recommendations It helped me a lot!! I registered for the MSF course for june 8th. I also bought a black CBR250 with abs (wont be in my drive till the 11th); i asked them to throw in something with the bike and they are giving me the tank/gas pad (I tried Max :p). I bought a helmet i have a tiny narrow head with a big nose lol so my options were limited i ended up getting a scorpion exo 400. And i got my self a stinger teknic jacket. Im going to get some gloves, pants, and boots in time for my course (love some input on those especially on boots). Im really excited to start riding :D. And this forum is really great. Ill keep you updated on the progress; thanks to you guys im off to a great start!! THANKS once again!!
 

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Welcome to the group (to which I am also new) and to riding (to which I'm not new).

This bike will be a great starter and much, much more. It's quite easy to launch, light and easy to maneuver, and has plenty of power for a really good time!
Like Luke said, you'll hear lots of different things from the group; some of us might even disagree with each other about our advice/opinions.

Take a rider course if at all possible; it seems expensive, but it's WAY worth it.

Buy gear that fits you well. You want to be fairly comfortable; the last thing you want to be doing while riding is fidgeting with your clothing, helmet, etc.

Try on helmets from several different makers. They'll have different shapes. I have a Shoei-shaped head; other helmets (very nice, high-dollar jobs) don't fit my head at all. You might have an Arai-shaped head. Everyone will have their favorite, but what fits your head best is what you should get (501CBR's tips on trying them on are sound). Things like how quiet, lightweight, or ventilated it is are nice (and sometimes pricey), but fit is top priority. Don't be afraid to spend plenty of money on a helmet, as it is without doubt the most important piece of gear you will buy. Get one with more of the nicer features if it makes you happier. Get the one you like the most that you can afford and, again, that fits you best.

Wear ear protection on trips longer than 10-15 minutes at speeds above 40 (or all the time once you get plenty of experience under your belt and don't feel a need to hear every little sound around you). Howard Leight MAX-1 NRR33 are great.

Don't be afraid to rev the engine more than you think you should. Use your clutch to control takeoffs and speed in slow turns, etc. Better to rev the engine more than to bog it down, stall it, etc.

Don't look car drivers eye to eye and think that they actually see you and are going to yield to you. Sure, look at their faces to get an idea of their intentions, but watch their front wheels for rotation (especially stopped cars at intersections, etc.).

Enjoy!
+1 on ear protection.

It's something everyone seems to forget about. I usually wear earplugs on every ride. It becomes a part of your routine if you keep doing it.
 

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Glad to see things coming alone for you !

Looks like we will both be in class June 8 th , different school though .
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ya thanks for the reminder for ear plugs etiainen totally forgot :eek:...question would it be wise to transition to headphones in the future?
Im looking forward to the classes its taught at Georgian College in Barrie. Me and my buddy tried to get into an earlier class but they were all full.
 

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Most people here and elsewhere aren't ok with headphones. They may also be illegal depending on where you live.

When I go out on long rides on the interstate I tend to put some tunes in just because it gets a bit boring otherwise.
 

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There should be enough space to fit a subwoofer on the rear of the bike. That'd make for some dirty glances.
 

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Bike safely especially if you have never taken a course in motorcycle riding.
Learn all about motorcycle safety, avoid heavy traffic and never ride outside the lane, or inside since drivers lose their field of vision.
Wear all your gear even if its 100 degrees outside. Learn to operate your bike first.
If it seems dangerous do not even do it such as lane changing, and speeding.
My first actual highway run was extremely dangerous, did not know how to lane change, or be in traffic.
I am an absolute beginner who has never rode a bike, did not know how to operate, and did not have anybody to teach me, But I survived!..........so far
 

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Always wear your helmet unless you want instant black freckles or a bug collage on your face, ESPECIALLY if you ride in the evening. Buy a motorcycle leather jacket for cold days and a mesh one for the summer. Get gloves and boots too. If you get caught in the rain pull over and get covered until it stops.
 

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Always wear your helmet unless you want instant black freckles or a bug collage on your face, ESPECIALLY if you ride in the evening. Buy a motorcycle leather jacket for cold days and a mesh one for the summer. Get gloves and boots too. If you get caught in the rain pull over and get covered until it stops.

Pull over and get covered? Boy you're a real biker.
 

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Pull over and get covered? Boy you're a real biker.
Wet weather riding is awesome ... everyone else on the road slows down, I don't know why.

Before I understood the importance of proper gear I used to ride with my Vans a fair bit, and wet weather ... yeah. Bad idea with cloth shoes lol
 

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Wet weather riding is awesome ... everyone else on the road slows down, I don't know why.

Before I understood the importance of proper gear I used to ride with my Vans a fair bit, and wet weather ... yeah. Bad idea with cloth shoes lol
Most car accidents occur when it rains:

Quote:

"Rainy weather can wreak havoc on highways. When a big storm rolls in, drivers tend to either slow down too much or not enough. Drivers need to be wary of driving in any change in the weather. A new study by transportation engineers reveals that nearly one-quarter of all crashes occur in bad weather conditions. Most happen on wet pavement."

Source:Bad Weather: Bad Drivers -- Transportation Researchers Calculate Number Of Crashes Due To Bad Weather


You have to remember that there can be oil on the road and slippery debris such as leaves, rain doesn't bode well for two-wheeled vehicles when combined with these items.

I know first hand b/c I totaled my scoot coming around a corner in the heavy rain and slid on some leaves. I've heard professional bikers say they avoid riding in the rain as well. I don't care how big and tough you are, slippery conditions can put you on your arse or worst.

A car's stopping distance is affected when it rains, if they hit the brakes hard they will slide forward.

Take my advice and stay away from the rain, don't even ride if there is rain in the forecast.
 
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